The fence and bench are made of redwood—the fence features a light stain while the bench is natural—and Podocarpus were planted for privacy and greenery. A no-mow fescue on the mounds of the berm invite the boys to roll, tumble, and enjoy their backyard. Bluegrass is planted on the flat areas and recycled brick is used for a small patio. Making smart use of the space, those redwood benches also store outdoor toys when not being played with.
Have you thought about revamping your front yard but don’t want to break the bank? There are so many great ideas out there that don’t cost much money at all! Whether it’s a patio area that needs a little fixer upper or a whole outdoor concept you’d like to start, so much can be done with a little ingenuity and inventiveness. We’ve compiled a list of cheap landscaping ideas that will not only be fun to start, but will also look absolutely amazing! Get the whole family in on the fun to create a gorgeous space everyone can appreciate! Keep reading for some great front yard landscaping ideas on a budget!
Plus, we will achieve those results using lawn care products that are proven to be safe. You won’t need to worry about the safety of your children or pets after a lawn treatment, because we make every effort to reduce the amount of pesticides and other harmful chemicals used on your lawn. We’re proud to have found a way of producing healthy, hardy lawns without putting your family’s health, or the environment, at risk.
Choosing the best plants, grasses, mulches and soil blends all differ by the region you are in.  Typically, local landscapers will have amassed this knowledge over time.  If you’re doing your own landscaping work, you may find conflicting knowledge about what to do simply because different authors live in different areas, and are only familiar with the best practices for their own area.  If you do decide to DIY, be sure to check out sites like WikiLawn Lawn Care and Plant Native that provide locally relevant information, as well as your state’s turfgrass extension.

Figure Out Your Style Depending on the current condition of your yard and your desired end result, your gardening style may determine how much or how little you're able to accomplish with do-it-yourself landscaping. "A landscape is really a direct expression of a homeowner's tastes and attitudes, and it also can be a place that provides a thoughtful and deliberate spot for activities they wish to do," says Michael Miller, president of Walden Backyards.
Here's a can't-miss tip for beautifying your yard: make sure you're providing something of interest in each of the four seasons. Do-it-yourself landscaping for 4-season interest begins with a well-researched plant-selection plan. The goal is to have flowering trees and/or shrubs throughout spring and summer, fall foliage in autumn and good structure in winter. This article describes how to achieve that goal.
There is a fight for sun. If the grass doesn't shade the weed, the weed will shade the grass. Sun is food. Food is strength and life. Shade is weakness, disease and death. Grass will shade the weeds only if it is tall enough. The shade of tall, dense grass turf will prevent essential light from reaching most weeds and, will aid in the destruction of new baby weed seedlings (such as the notorius dandelion).
The most important key to this rustic aesthetic is being sure not to overplant the container. You are sure to love the look of this arrangement when you give the flowers space to breathe. This weathered, rusty metal bucket—another incredible flea market find—is studded with periwinkles, the profusely blooming Rieger begonias, coleus, and other annuals. But what it is not is overcrowded, which could keep the plants from getting adequate light. For even more rustic, Southern-inspired charm, try suspending this arrangement on a branch. This will add to the casual, easy-does-it feeling.
Many factors influence lawn water requirements, and no two lawns are exactly alike. A healthy, high-quality bluegrass or ryegrass lawn may need up to 2.25 inches of water per week under hot, dry, windy summer conditions. It may require much less when the weather is cool or cloudy. Turf-type tall fescue may perform well with less water than a bluegrass lawn, if it can grow a deep root system. In many cases, however, tall fescue requires as much water as bluegrass to look good. Buffalograss and blue grama lawns can remain green for weeks without watering, even during the hottest summer weather.
Prized for both its flavor and its aroma, mint can be an incredible herb to have growing in a garden container. What’s more, its bright green leaves can bring in a pop of color. Left uncontrolled, however, mint can have a tendency to overrun an outdoor space. With this in mind, you will want to keep more invasive herbs, like mints, contained in pots in your kitchen garden. Pick your mint based on the flavor you want and whether you’d prefer it for tea or for flavoring food—you’ll be thrilled by mint’s wondrous varieties.
For example, some people may be content with small tweaks to what they already have -- a few beds and borders surrounding a lawn, for example. Those simpler landscapes which focus on maximizing existing elements lend themselves easily to do-it-yourself landscaping. But more formal arrangements -- lots of shrubs, complicated beds, plenty of hardscaping -- may require the muscle and expertise of professionals. Learn more about garden styles.
If you are starting with a blank slate, choosing the right kind of plants for your yard can be an overwhelming experience. There are so many options and each plant has a particular kind of soil and sun exposure that they grow best in as well as different moisture requirements. Doing your own landscaping will require a lot of reading up on native plants in your area as well as the possibility of pulling plants that you think are weeds.
In days past, the best way to find a lawn care professional to service your lawn was to pull out the yellow pages and look up someone in your area or simply just choose a lawn service company that sounded good. LawnStarter has simplified the process and made it better. The process is now completely automated through our website from arranging for someone to come out and mow your yard to paying for the service. We also have friendly customer service experts on-hand to help you with every step of the process. With Lawnstarter, you can rest assured that you're only getting the top-rated lawn service professionals. We bring you the top-rated lawn care services in your area.
Nothing ruins the view in a small backyard faster than a set of garbage cans blown over in the wind. Instead of having your garbage in plain sight, build a wooden surround to keep them contained. Here, a set of stylish wooden panels camouflages the homeowners garbage with a little space left over for bags of potting soil and extra garden tools. When the gate panel is closed, everything is completely hidden.

In days past, the best way to find a lawn care professional to service your lawn was to pull out the yellow pages and look up someone in your area or simply just choose a lawn service company that sounded good. LawnStarter has simplified the process and made it better. The process is now completely automated through our website from arranging for someone to come out and mow your yard to paying for the service. We also have friendly customer service experts on-hand to help you with every step of the process. With Lawnstarter, you can rest assured that you're only getting the top-rated lawn service professionals. We bring you the top-rated lawn care services in your area.
But, JD, you have made decision to deny their existence, even though they are role models for frugality, etc. (sending many billions of dollars back to Mexico etc. even though earning very low wages). I embrace them for the cheap labor they are, and I believe we should all take advantage. I have traveled all over the world, and have specialized in Latin America, and have traveled extensively there, and I have met guys and even some girls from all over South & Central America who have swam across the Rio Grande risking literally everything they had in order to earn a couple of extra bucks in America. In my opinion they are the shit, they are bad asses who work very hard, and can earn a buck anywhere they go, they are role models for all of us aspiring to be frugal, to save money, and to get rich slowly. But, yet, you pretend they do not exist.
Three truly is the charm—flowers, that is, since the third flower brings together the two prevalent colors in this fantastic container garden arrangement. Simply adding a bicolored viola to this planter is a way to create a bold sense of visual interest while keeping all of the ease of maintaining this container garden. This fantastical planter has a cast relief of a gryphon on its side, bringing a sense of history and drama to the quiet softness of the flowers themselves. When considering this approach to your garden, look for a single planter that can form the centerpiece, and then complete your design around it.
Installing a patio or bench near the edge of your lawn, away from the house, provides an outdoor escape. Concrete will do, or you can use stones or pavers. Building it near trees or tall flowers gives the area some privacy, while chairs or benches let you sit or lie down to read or nap. Keep it 6 to 8 feet from your property line and surround it with flowers.
Out is in! In recent years, there’s been a boom in building and refurbishing outdoor rooms and spaces. More and more, homeowners, landscape designers, and builders are transforming backyards, side yards, and patios into comfortable, attractive, and usable living spaces that provide a beautiful setting and improve curb appeal. Landscaping Ideas that Work is the most comprehensive resource of inspired design ideas and practical solutions for all landscaping and outdoor living spaces. With practical design advice as well as over 350 innovative ideas and photographs, this is the only sourcebook you’ll ever need for smart design, buying, and installation decisions for your outdoor digs.

As they say, things that look like they are alike always reveal their little differences, and things that seem at first like they may be different often turn out to be quite alike. If you adopt this approach to your container gardening, you’ll find that grouping flowers by form or by color becomes a great way to rethink your approach to planting if you have a tendency to keep your flowers all the same. Instead of only one flower, use several flowers of the same color for a greater impact in a small planting. Tall yellow daffodils, medium-size pansies, and small violas are a happy mix in this terra-cotta planter.


You don't need a huge backyard to have a water garden. In fact, installing a water garden is a great way to handle low or wet spots in your garden. Just dig out the area, add a pond liner and pump, and you're on your way. Even a tiny oasis will attract a wide range of colorful butterflies and birds. In this garden, Water Snowflake, Nymphoides humboldtiana, a small relative of water lily, provides color in tight quarters.
Dog poop and dog pee are both high in nitrogen. But if you give your lawn too much nitrogen, you'll kill it. Not the whole lawn. Just the spot with too much nitrogen. Usually there will be a load of dog poop and the grass under it will be dead. And the grass immediately around it will be greener, taller, thicker and healthier than all the rest of the lawn. So the stuff immediately under the crap is "too much" and the stuff surrounding the crap is "optimal". Same thing for pee only there won't be a pile of poop in the middle.
One way to create a sense of space in a small garden is to put some curves into your garden paths. A slightly meandering walkway is always better than a straight path because it will give visitors the sense that they are traveling through a large landscape. Just be sure to make your path wide enough for two people to walk side by side comfortably. This curved concrete path is especially appealing because a ribbon of tile separates each slab of concrete.
Cluster containers in one space for high impact. Look at the group as a whole composition, and plant it as a cohesive unit with complementary and repeated colors. If you don’t feel confident with how you choose colors, think of your plants like you might think of a artist’s color wheel—or use the idea of a color chart, or the colors from the paint chips at a home improvement store, to get ideas for how you might like shades and tones to go together. Then, select your plants and your containers to create the feeling you love in the space that makes you feel comfortable.
Your garden will seem wild, and it will certainly be full of life, when you have some 'Tiger' fern (a selection of Boston fern) in your container garden. Pair it with your tulips, Lavender Blue' and 'Purple Wing' Plentifall pansies, acorus, heuchera, and variegated ivy. These simply shaped concrete pots enhance any outdoor environment. Their angled geometry pairs well with the color and movement sprouting out of their tops. Let the plants grow and flow—the containers keep them just where you want them, creating a great harmony of color, and, as they drape over the edges, you’ll see where Plentifall pansies got their name.
As they say, things that look like they are alike always reveal their little differences, and things that seem at first like they may be different often turn out to be quite alike. If you adopt this approach to your container gardening, you’ll find that grouping flowers by form or by color becomes a great way to rethink your approach to planting if you have a tendency to keep your flowers all the same. Instead of only one flower, use several flowers of the same color for a greater impact in a small planting. Tall yellow daffodils, medium-size pansies, and small violas are a happy mix in this terra-cotta planter.
If you make the perfect plant selection for your container garden, no summer will see you shedding tears over a poor selection of plants. Instead, great growers like these Mini Cascade ivy geraniums will take the South’s harsh summer heat and just keep on blooming. Geraniums work wonders as part of a hanging container garden, blossoming to a rich, full, and verdant cascade of flowers spilling over and out of their planters. You’ll be excited by the rush of color, but even more thrilled with how simple these Cascading Geraniums are to maintain.

A woodland backyard near Chicago designed by Hursthouse Landscape Architects and Contractors features pavers and shredded bark. Care was used to respect the existing trees while also creating additional privacy for the homeowners. Plants include Annabelle hydrangeas, Pachysandra 'Green Carpet' ground cover, and Mission Arborvitae evergreen shrubs. 

Beautiful and inspiring pictures, great principles, it gave me what I needed for my project. For people new to the details involved in plants, there's not a lot of information in this book, but that's not what it set out to achieve. It's a great 'one of many' you should have in your collection if directing your landscaping, or wanting to be part of the decision-making process.
Certain ornamental grasses, like maiden grass, are resistant to dog traffic without having sharp blades that will cut or otherwise injure your pup. This greenery holds its shape throughout the year, and will give your dog plenty of space to play. That being said, what’s more important than planting dog-resistant plants is planting species that are not harmful to dogs. Some flowers, like azaleas and daffodils, can be toxic to dogs and should not be planted in a place where they might accidentally be ingested.

Install new grass: aerating and reseeding doesn’t have to be handled by a pro. If your grass needs a boost every spring and fall, consider renting a small tiller (if you don’t have access to one) and church gently through your yard at a depth of about an inch. Follow tilling with pre-treated seed and straw. Water daily. Fertilizer can burn seedlings, so wait until the grass stand is about a month old before feeding it chemical fertilizers. If switching grass species, till the yard at a 3-inch depth and make sure to rake the yard well after tilling to avoid cross contamination with old clippings. Sodding a yard is slightly trickier, only because it requires that the ground beneath be cleaned and prepared to accept the sod. Consult your local garden center to see if you’re up for the task.
When you plan your garden, think about how it’s going to look in all four seasons. Many gardens look terrific in the spring and early summer, but by fall they fade. Choose perennials and annuals that offer late-season color and shrubs and trees that bear colorful berries or interesting bark in the winter. In this tiny front border, a bevy of tulips provide plenty of spring color. After they fade, they are replaced with summer beauties such as geranium and verbena. Holly shrubs, which flank the front door, develop showy red berries that keep the landscape looking good after frost.
MYTH: "If I mow short, it will be longer until I have to mow again." False! Wrong! (SLAP! SLAP! SLAP!) Your grass needs grass blades to do photosynthesis (convert sunshine into sugar) to feed the roots. When you whack the blades off, the grass has to RACE to make more blades to make sugar. It then grows amazingly fast. This fast growth uses up a lot of the grass's stored sugar, and weakens the plant. It is now vulnerable to disease and pests! Tall grass is healthier and can use the extra sugar to make rhizomes (more grass plants) thus thickening the turf. Have you ever noticed that short grass in the summer is always riddled with dead brown patches?
Divide and Conquer Just because you've come up with a plan doesn't mean it has to be implemented in a single year. In fact, most homeowners should look at an overall vision that's phased in over several years at a minimum, says Miller. To gain the most in curb appeal, start in the front yard and work your way back. Phasing in a project may also allow you to pay for some landscaping tasks in later years while doing some yourself up front.

Spaced-out pavers or stepping stones offer an affordable alternative to hardscape. The shape, material, and arrangement of the pavers will also help define the character of your backyard, whether you're going for a more playful or structured feel. To ensure long-term low maintenance, choose pavers made from sturdier, non-porous materials; set them on a sturdy foundation such as compacted sand to protect against sinking; and install pavers level to the land for easier mowing.

If you have container gardens, chances are they're on your porch, entryway, deck, patio, or balcony. Too few gardeners consider the gardening idea of mixing containers into their beds and borders. Doing so is an easy way to add flexibility to the landscape. Large, colorful glazed or plastic containers are a great landscape idea to add a bright splash, even without blooms. You can move them around to highlight different parts of your yard, plus it's easy to change out container gardens each season to get a different look.
×