Nothing ruins the view in a small backyard faster than a set of garbage cans blown over in the wind. Instead of having your garbage in plain sight, build a wooden surround to keep them contained. Here, a set of stylish wooden panels camouflages the homeowners garbage with a little space left over for bags of potting soil and extra garden tools. When the gate panel is closed, everything is completely hidden.

Creating furniture out of old wooden pallets has to be one of the easiest, most creative and affordable things you can do! Not only does this type of furniture look great, it creates a sort of rustic landscape that can easily be dressed up or down. You can stain or paint your pallet furniture to match whatever theme or setting you’ve incorporated into the setting. Add some fun patio cushions and you’ve got an amazing outdoor area that will look fantastic all year long!

The problem is that its very difficult to get your money back when you sell your house if you spend thousands of dollars in landscaping. It’s one of those things that a home owner has to do – it goes with owning a house. I better way to get out of the work, since you know it isn’t compensated for when purchasing a house, it you buy a house that already has the landscaping done. So – when are you selling?
Have some broken down furniture you don’t know what to do with? Use them in the garden to create a rustic landscape! You already have the stuff – so you might as well put them to good use. Anything from broken wooden benches, stools or wagon wheels (like the ones depicted) can easily create some character in any sort of garden setting. I can imagine a steer or longhorn skull somewhere in this scene – so if you by chance have one lying around, that could also be used! Don’t go and kill a steer, though. That would defeat the purpose of “refurbishing!”

Flowers are great, but don't forget the characteristics of a plant's branching pattern and foliage. In landscape design, varying form and texture is one way to spice up a yard with diversity. Evergreen conifers, while lacking flowers altogether, nonetheless have foliage that offers a myriad of different forms and textures. While browsing these do-it-yourself landscaping tips, you'll discover many ways to enhance the beauty of your yard.
You don’t have to get out the clippers, although should the mood strike, you can train and topiary these boxwoods into any shape that you like. Potted boxwoods offer the beauty of formal elegance with the simplicity of little maintenance. In general, boxwoods can be drought tolerant, and you won’t have to fertilize them too often. This large American variety creates a living wall in a line of concrete planters—a process helped by planting the boxwoods in identical planters at the same time. Use a few simple tips and tricks to make your boxwood container garden easy to maintain, but even easier and more beautiful to behold.

When it comes to paths and patios, gravel is a much more affordable surface than paving. To lay it in place; mark out the area, then scrape away loose soil or grass, pin down a permeable membrane to stop the weeds coming through and spread the gravel over it. Aim for a depth of 2.5cm. Choose a pale gravel, like Honey Stone, to contrast with your lawn and planting. A large bag will cover around 20 sq metres.
“We switched to Virginia Green this year after using another company for a few years with subpar results. We are very pleased with the thorough care that Virginia Green is giving our lawn, which looks great this year. Every time they are out they provide helpful information and take time to talk to us about any problem areas or issues. Highly recommend them!”
You’ll be phobia-free about welcoming these spiders into your home—spider plants, that is. For this flowing composition that can create color throughout your garden, Red ‘Freida Hemple’ caladiums, a spider plant, and a ‘Little Gem’ Southern magnolia decorate a large pot in the corner. This helps hide a downspout, and fills the space with bright beauty. Working with the idea that repetition creates rhythm, and that builds to a harmonious container garden, smaller pots of the same caladiums tie the grouping together. The boldness of the plants is contrasted with the simple, neutral containers. Think of using natural tones in stone and off-white for these outdoor container compositions.
Got an old utility or shoe rack lying around? Line the shelves with moss and plant herbs and vegetables to your heart’s content! Either lean the rack against an outside wall, or mount it. Watering tip: Moss drains very quickly, and many gardeners can get frustrated trying to keep their plants properly hydrated. To avoid this, add a layer of plastic with drainage holes below the moss.

One of the challenges with container gardening can be retaining visual beauty through changing seasons. This thoughtful approach puts that problem to rest. The solution is to think of every container as having a 'keeper'—a durable plant that continues from season to season—with a plant that may require more attention. For this beautiful pair of urns we’ve partnered colorful annuals with an evergreen for an established planting that can still change from season to season. With ivy spilling over the sides, and 'Pandora’s Box' violas providing bold tones, these planters are pure excitement. In general, violas are more tolerant of temperature variation than the botanically similar pansies.


Plant an attention grabber with a creative combination. This tall jar showcases Japanese roof irises and creeping strawberry begonias. Japanese roof irises—known as such because they were traditionally grown on the roofs of Japanese cottages—can thrive in those conditions. Begonias, which are native to tropical and subtropical regions, work well partnered with these irises. They propagate well. If you plan to use begonias in a hanging basket in your container garden, consider a trailing or climbing variety, like the hybrid ‘Potpourri.’ Dragon Wing begonias will also do well in your containers. Select your favorites, and enjoy their beauty.
We’ve just built a small guest house behind our home in Southwest Mississippi. Red clay surrounds the house! I’ve sprinkled rye grass seed and covered it with hay, but I realize (now) that I need some top soil. What should be my next steps? The rest of the yard is covered with a mixture of Bermuda and who-knows-what. It’s pretty patchy too! (I can’t afford to re-sod the whole 2 acres…)
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★★ Requires purchase of full mosquito plan. Special price of $39.95 is for first mosquito application only, for new EasyPay or PrePay residential customers only, and applies to properties up to 1 acre. For properties more than 1 acre, please call for estimate. Valid at participating TruGreen locations. Availability of services may vary by geography. Not to be combined with or used in conjunction with any other offer or discount. Additional restrictions may apply. Consumer responsible for all sales tax. ✧ Guarantee applies to full plan customers only.
We’ve just built a small guest house behind our home in Southwest Mississippi. Red clay surrounds the house! I’ve sprinkled rye grass seed and covered it with hay, but I realize (now) that I need some top soil. What should be my next steps? The rest of the yard is covered with a mixture of Bermuda and who-knows-what. It’s pretty patchy too! (I can’t afford to re-sod the whole 2 acres…)
As you can see, there are so many cool ways to transform a landscaping job into a fun, cheap process everyone will appreciate. Whether you have a tiny side garden that needs a fixer upper or a giant yard that needs a major renovation, surely some of these great ideas will spark some creativity within yourself to give it a try! So which ideas are your favorites? You can easily pick and choose which elements from which photos you’d like to try and use them to create your own awesome landscaping job. It’s really not that hard, it just takes a little bit of imagination and elbow grease! Good luck with creating your perfect outdoor space!
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This is my first year having a true garden, and so far I’m loving the time I get outside playing in the dirt and absorbing the sunshine. It’s certainly a nice break from my computer! As a beginner, I’m learning a lot of things that will make next year’s garden easier, and hopefully a little healthier, too. I don’t want to win the prize for the largest squash (not there yet), but I do want enough juicy tomatoes to last all summer long.
Another contemporary gardening trend of 2017 emphasizes the popular idea of sustainability and local growing.  Using the latest in simple vegetable gardening ideas, you can transform an outdoor space from not only beautiful, but functional and flourishing as well.  There are several unique options to incorporate produce into your outdoor design scheme that do not require traditional large areas of soil dedicated to fruits and vegetables. Large garden plant pots are great options for people working with small backyards or narrow areas.  Pots or specially made containers can even be placed on a deck or patio and incorporated as a cool decoration or pop of color.
If you're not ready to nix grass completely, consider which grasses naturally grow in your region. "If you plant a grass that is accustomed to your climate, that makes it low maintenance," says Chris. "You can research which grass grows best in your area, and in turn save money on watering, fertilizing, and other maintenance." For instance: In the Northeast — where the couple lives in their Cape Cod home — fescue and ryegrass grow well. Alternatively, in the Southeast, Bermuda grass is a better option.

Nothing ruins the view in a small backyard faster than a set of garbage cans blown over in the wind. Instead of having your garbage in plain sight, build a wooden surround to keep them contained. Here, a set of stylish wooden panels camouflages the homeowners garbage with a little space left over for bags of potting soil and extra garden tools. When the gate panel is closed, everything is completely hidden.
But for those who shun such a laissez-faire approach to landscaping, the resources below will provide some handy tips on pest control. Deer (and the ticks they bring) are a major pest in some regions. But you can stay organic and humane while still keeping the deer at bay, by using fencing or restricting yourself to deer-resistant plants, such as lavender
One of the most exciting ways to create a boxwood garden is to make subtle changes to varieties of the same plant. For this design, English boxwoods growing in the ground surround a terra-cotta pot planted with an American boxwood. When planning your boxwood garden, particularly if you plan to use containers, be sure that they will be well drained, and that they can be kept fungus-free. Also, Southern gardeners face specific challenges: Choose boxwoods that are best suited for hot and humid climates; be aware of insects that may wreak havoc on boxwoods; and check your site’s exposure before planting. Follow these simple steps and you will reap the rewards of a beautiful boxwood container garden.

You can contain a garden that’s simple and beautiful with a raised planter on wheels. It’s ideal for gardening in small spaces or if you have limited mobility. This raised planter is ergonomically designed and convenient to reach from all sides. It creates a waist-high garden that eliminates bending. Plus, the height prevents weed seeds from blowing in and helps keep critters out. If you’re worried about the planter moving, don’t be. The 2 non-wheeled legs are firm to the ground so it will remain stationary. The raised planter will make a great addition to your apartment’s balcony.
If you spend any time online, you’ll see planters made from items like cinderblocks, wooden pallets, and rain gutters. Available at home improvement stores, these make very unusual and creative vertical planters. One caveat: When planting edibles, use only new, clean cinderblocks lined with plastic (punch drainage holes into bottom), and wooden pallets that have not been chemically treated.
This ingenious organic look comes from contrasting the strong, stark lines of a modern container with the soft, ripple-in-the breeze movement of natural plants. A carefully curated selection of beautiful containers embody the warm, rich metal tones in this well-designed outdoor oasis. The handsome planter on the mantel has a slate-like finish and blends various succulents with the pink plumes of 'Joey' ptilotus, a bottlebrush plant that is native to Australia. Large-leaved kalanchoes and dwarf golden arborvitaes form the base of this masterpiece, which can grace this mantel just as easily as it could highlight the center of a backyard dining table.
From the first ideas to the final plantings, planning is key. That's why you must break out the gridded graph paper and sketch a detailed plan for how you want your landscape to look. Having a map of your intended designs notated with plantings and plots will help you first imagine what should go where and then bring your vision to fruition. (It’s also a handy guide to keep nearby when you’re elbow deep in hostas and can’t remember how many rows you meant to plant.)

One of the challenges with container gardening can be retaining visual beauty through changing seasons. This thoughtful approach puts that problem to rest. The solution is to think of every container as having a 'keeper'—a durable plant that continues from season to season—with a plant that may require more attention. For this beautiful pair of urns we’ve partnered colorful annuals with an evergreen for an established planting that can still change from season to season. With ivy spilling over the sides, and 'Pandora’s Box' violas providing bold tones, these planters are pure excitement. In general, violas are more tolerant of temperature variation than the botanically similar pansies.
Out is in! In recent years, there’s been a boom in building and refurbishing outdoor rooms and spaces. More and more, homeowners, landscape designers, and builders are transforming backyards, side yards, and patios into comfortable, attractive, and usable living spaces that provide a beautiful setting and improve curb appeal. Landscaping Ideas that Work is the most comprehensive resource of inspired design ideas and practical solutions for all landscaping and outdoor living spaces. With practical design advice as well as over 350 innovative ideas and photographs, this is the only sourcebook you’ll ever need for smart design, buying, and installation decisions for your outdoor digs.
More outdoor space means more chances to entertain in warm weather — and less work for you. "Creating outdoor living spaces lends itself to low-maintenance landscaping because you can extend your home while having fewer grassy areas to care for," says Peyton. The couple has a stone patio with a grilling area, dining table, and separate fire pit area in their home. Similarly, a deck is an equally low-maintenance option.
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