Purple heart is a wonderful ground cover, but it can have a tendency to run, and become invasive. As the focus of a container it fills to a beautiful, bold color, and a lush fullness. Create opportunities for container gardening by building planters into your hardscaping any time you do a creative outdoor project. In this innovative design they have literally taken the edge off—a large, round planter filled with Purple Heart softens the corner of this wall. Let it become a feature, and let a plant like Purple Heart be its focal point.
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Using evergreen plants in a container means that you will always have a base that will look good for years. Once this element of your container is established, you can fill in with beautiful plants that may need more attention, but that will be easy. Choose something like a cast-iron plant, and then add in some caladiums, some impatiens, and even a creeping fig. This will give you the classics to thrill, fill, and spill. Any shade-loving combination that works well in a container can add color to an entry. If you need more structure, or balance, simply create an additional container of the same size and materials, or do a smaller one as a complement.

This abundantly rich and vibrant design puts the flowers in the spotlight. These will literally and figuratively be a beautiful sight. Perched atop a painted brick wall, the sleek container is covered by the overflowing blooms, which include sweeping pink petunias, super-delicate baby’s tears, and rounded clusters of rose-pink dianthus. For this arrangement, the focus is entirely on the flowers. In fact, the hidden pot is merely here to offer grounding support. Depending on your design, you may even wish to consider a series of these containers as a way to highlight a garden wall and bring color and emphasis to something you might have always wished to ignore. You won’t have to imagine the beauty—it will be right in front of you.


This woven wicker basket is a natural way to decorate a bare wall in an outdoor space, and it will look just as beautiful whether you set it against brick, timber, or concrete. Pink zinnias and yellow tuberous begonias are the focal points or 'thrillers'. You’ll love the variation between the tighter, round zinnias and the softer, open petals of the begonias. Blue Cape plumbago and golden lantana add an extra hint of drama—think of these as the 'fillers'. Finally, English ivy, with its delicate, well-known shape, cascades over the side—that is the 'spiller', which gives this beautiful hanging container a sense of movement.
From a simple penchant for yellow flowers as a child to becoming a full-time gardener, nature advocate, and garden designer, I am extremely happy to finally have a platform for me to successfully spread knowledge and expertise in the garden. After highschool graduation, I took many courses related to garden design to feed myself with more knowledge and expertise other than what I learned from my mom growing up. Soon as I finished courses, I gained more experience through internships and most especially, garden shows! I also tried to join as many garden design competitions locally. For any garden design inquiries, ping me!

Perennial flowers are wonderful for your planting beds, but they bloom for only so long. You may have perennials blooming in your bed in May, then nothing until July. Incorporating annuals into a do-it-yourself landscaping plan will "plug the gaps," giving you continuous color in the yard. Use my picture gallery to find ideas for your ​color schemes. The gallery is preceded by an introduction to employing color in landscape design.

The most cost effective way to fill flowerbeds with great looking plants is to buy perennials that you can divide. This may sound like advanced level gardening but really it isn't. It will work with clump forming perennials such as geums, astrantia and hardy geraniums. Simply tip the plant out of its pot and pull it apart into two or three bits, each with some stalks and root. Dig a hole and plant each part in your flowerbed. Next year when they've grown and spread, you can dig them up and pull them apart again to gain even more plants. You'll get a wonderful display in a couple of years for very little cash. Six geranium plants are usually enough to get going in an average sized garden.
Choosing to do your own landscaping will ultimately save you money in the long run. Yes, there may be some up front costs of purchasing your own tools and buying the wrong fertilizer a time or two, but you won’t be paying to have a service come and do the landscaping for you. Many homeowners who choose to do their own landscaping work have other family members that can help out with the chores like spouses or kids. Tending to your own landscaping is a budget friendly option that many homeowners choose in order to save money.
Certain ornamental grasses, like maiden grass, are resistant to dog traffic without having sharp blades that will cut or otherwise injure your pup. This greenery holds its shape throughout the year, and will give your dog plenty of space to play. That being said, what’s more important than planting dog-resistant plants is planting species that are not harmful to dogs. Some flowers, like azaleas and daffodils, can be toxic to dogs and should not be planted in a place where they might accidentally be ingested.
A month after we received our plans, a local nursery had a 40%-off “going out of business” sale.  With the designer's list in hand, we were able to purchase about a third of our total plant materials at a substantial discount. We were worried because we weren't anywhere near ready to put them into the ground yet. Fortunately, we live in a mild climate, and the plants survived several months in pots. 
Pebbles are an easy way to bring different colours and textures to your backyard. You can use them to fill up empty spaces in your garden beds or as ground cover to compliment a paved or decking area. For a clean, decorative look you can use pebbles to create a border or landscape a path. There are a range of colours and styles to choose from including white, blue, orange, red, green, lime, silver and gold. By using the same colour pebble you can keep it simple or mix the colours to create a more vibrant look.
Building large retaining walls is not considered a DIY project. If you need a tall wall, chances are you have an erosion problem just waiting to happen and need to call on a professional. By contrast, though, simple terracing jobs are excellent DIY landscaping projects for beginners. After building small stone retaining walls, you can plant behind them, as you would for a raised bed.
They say that form follows function, but in the case of nature its beautiful forms follow their own rules. The cascading form of ivy geraniums makes them ideal for hanging baskets and window boxes. This basket is filled with the ‘Sophie Cascade’ variety, which billows out over the edges, creating a rich cloud of leaves and blossoms.  Ivy geraniums are often used as a spiller plant in container gardens, giving life and movement to any arrangement. Here they are the star in their own right, bursting forth in a blaze of bright pink.

Tougher than Clint Eastwood, lantana parties in heat, chortles at drought, and blooms in a slew of sunny colors from spring to fall. Plus, its nectar-laden flowers attract pretty butterflies like moths to a flame. This beautiful plant is native to America, so if you want to focus on plants that will attract or entice wildlife, this can be a good choice. Lantana is also generally resistant to deer—they don’t find it particularly attractive, even though you will. So plant a container or two of this wonderful, durable plant, then sit back and wait for your fluttering-winged visitors to arrive.
From a simple penchant for yellow flowers as a child to becoming a full-time gardener, nature advocate, and garden designer, I am extremely happy to finally have a platform for me to successfully spread knowledge and expertise in the garden. After highschool graduation, I took many courses related to garden design to feed myself with more knowledge and expertise other than what I learned from my mom growing up. Soon as I finished courses, I gained more experience through internships and most especially, garden shows! I also tried to join as many garden design competitions locally. For any garden design inquiries, ping me!

A simple-to-follow formula is all you need to create drama in a container. Here, it takes only four plants to convey the sweeping illusion of a floor-length gown. The key to pulling this off is starting with an elevated planter so the vibrant 'Celebration' and 'Florida Sweetheart' caladiums pop at eye level. Clusters of white wishbone flower fill the empty spaces between the caladium stems and also conceal the actual container, which means you can use just about any freestanding vessel. The final attention grabber is the graceful creeping Jenny spilling over the sides. Position this planter in the shade and water regularly for a gorgeous, easy-to-maintain display.


You’ve seen those tomato planters on TV that grow tomatoes upside down, but for a few dollars you can get into vertical gardening by making your own. Start with a new, clean 5-gallon bucket and, using a utility knife, cut a circle out of the bottom that’s just large enough to feed a small determinate tomato plant through. Add a few smaller holes for drainage, then fill the bucket with potting soil and hang it wherever there’s sun.
Measure thatch buildup by removing a small piece of turf, including the underlying soil. Try to slow buildup when the thatch layer exceeds 1/2 inch in thickness. The thickness can increase quickly beyond this point, making it difficult to control later. As the thatch layer thickens, it becomes the main rooting medium for the grass. This predisposes the turf to drought stress or winter kill and increases the possibility for insect, disease and weed problems. Also, fertilizers and pesticides applied to a thatchy lawn work less effectively.
Think of this as the 'other' Lily, meaning not the one 'of the Valley.' Lily-of-the-Nile performs incredibly well in a container, and can say in the same pot for years. It doesn’t mind crowded roots in the least, meaning that this plant will require less maintenance than others might. Lily-of-the-Nile can live in full sun or light shade, so you’ll have great choices for where you can locate your containers. Given their range of incredible blue shades, these look beautiful near pools. Some named types may eventually grow to be as tall as three feet.
You can bring real definition to your backyard and create a great look with pavers. An easy project you can do yourself, pavers make a strong foundation for your outdoor entertaining area or you can run a pathway through your garden. You’ll find Bunnings has a range of different paver colours and designs to suit any backyard, from concrete textured pavers, panelstone and sandstone pavers and concrete log-style stepping stones.
Nothing ruins the view in a small backyard faster than a set of garbage cans blown over in the wind. Instead of having your garbage in plain sight, build a wooden surround to keep them contained. Here, a set of stylish wooden panels camouflages the homeowners garbage with a little space left over for bags of potting soil and extra garden tools. When the gate panel is closed, everything is completely hidden.
Shallow, frequent watering encourages "thatch" (the grass propogates with above-soil runners (like strawberry runners) rather than rhizomes under the soil - there gets to be so many runners that they weave a mat that chokes out water and air). Since the roots are in the top inch or two of soil, a hot day will quickly dry the soil and much of the grass will brown. Weeds and weed seedlings looooove a daily watering. It's just what they need for a good start.
With so many sizes, shapes and colors, it’d be impossible not to make an outdoor area look super great with string lights. There’s literally a size, shape and color for any theme or setting. These are a super easy way to add some style to an area without changing much of anything. Since most of these are now in LED form, they also would save you on energy costs in the long run. Whether you have a large, lofty area surrounded by trees you want to add some whimsical glow to, or a smaller backyard patio area you’d like to make more bohemian, these little lights go a long way in the style department!
Are you dreaming of a summer vacation, but the only thing on the horizon is more heat and humidity? This may not be a balmy getaway, but bringing the Tropics to your doorstep is a breeze with this combo: this beautiful container with a water-inspired glaze has a gorgeous array of plants that burst forth like a sunburst on a bright day. You’ll love giant-leaved, sunny ‘Maui Gold’ elephant’s ear; heavily blooming, fiery orange SunPatiens; velvety, fragrant citronella plant; purple iridescent Persian shield; and a heavenly skirt of angel vine spilling down the sides. If you listen closely you will be able to hear the ocean.

Using white to lighten your garden is a great way to let the tone of plants themselves be the neutral foundation for the design you build upon. Here several large pots of white impatiens filled to bursting brighten this shady corner with hundreds of blooms. Apart from being filled with one type of plant, these white impatiens are planted in a single style of container—this can help to tie your outdoor space together. If you are planning on planting several different container garden features, consider choosing separate planters for each, or choose a single planter to create a sense of harmony.

Plus, we will achieve those results using lawn care products that are proven to be safe. You won’t need to worry about the safety of your children or pets after a lawn treatment, because we make every effort to reduce the amount of pesticides and other harmful chemicals used on your lawn. We’re proud to have found a way of producing healthy, hardy lawns without putting your family’s health, or the environment, at risk.


Terraced stone steps in a mix-and-match pattern creates a strong focal point, while "character" plants create visual interest on both sides of the path. Rusty-hued Carex testacea softens the front path, while green kniphofia, plum Heuchera ‘Obsidian’, Libertia peregrinans ‘Bronze Sword’, and euphorbia surround the ‘Karl Foerster’ grass. Across the path, drifts of Picea sitchensis ‘Papoose’, variegated iris, and Phormium ‘Dusky Chief’ encircle a ginkgo tree.
Sheds, garages, and outdoor workspaces are not always the most attractive accents to your carefully constructed yardscape. Simultaneously hide these structures and make the most of these spaces by using them as a setting for a beautiful display of plants and flowers. Try adding brackets and a wooden plank to create a shelf on the exterior of a structure above the entrance or windows. Then, set lightweight fiberglass planters filled with flowers atop it to hide the structure and also add natural ambience to the entryway. Potted ferns are great additions for the base of the structure and they give an earthy accent to the threshold. Bringing plants both nearer and actually onto the walls of the structure will make it seem like a seamless complement to the greenspace.
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