Weed and feed. lightly water lawn before applying, so fertilizer sticks to the leaves of the clover. Dandelion, clover, plantain are broadleaf weeds. The best time to apply a general-purpose broadleaf herbicide for the control of perennial broadleaf weeds such as dandelion, plantain, and clover is early September to early November. As winter approaches, perennial broadleaf weeds are storing energy reserves in stems and roots; a fall-applied herbicide will enter the plant and travel to these plant parts with the food reserves. The second best time is in the late spring or early summer period after the weeds have flowered. If applying in the late spring, be extremely cautious with these herbicides near ornamentals, trees, flowers, and vegetable gardens because these plants can be damaged by these herbicides through direct application, drift, and/or volatilization (the herbicide turns into a vapor). This is another reason why we prefer to apply these herbicides in the fall.
If you are looking for a simple but fantastic summer gathering decorating idea, one of the best is to add color to your outdoor party with potted plants. In the heat of the season in the South, there’s no need for a patterned tablecloth here. Potted petunias will add all the beautiful color you need under the glass-top dining table, and make a show stopping, sensational and unexpected addition to your outdoor party décor. These planters have a simple curved wrought-iron base that works well with the simple glass top of the table, but you can match the container to your own personal design and decorating style.

To finish last year's backyard work, we put in the lawn.  The ground was level and the soil was adequate, so all we had to do was rent a roller ($7), add minimal nutrients, and it was ready to go.  We chose to lay sod because we have children and a dog, and it would have been very difficult to keep them out of seed-sown grass for an extended time.  The small area lent itself to sod, and provided instant green for minimal cash outlay. 
If you use stone in landscaping beds, consider how much wind your region gets and how the stone will match the aesthetic of your home. "Pea stone comes in different sizes, so you can get a three-quarter inch stone if you're worried about wind," says Chris. "Crushed stone also comes in a variety of colors, so you can change it depending on your style, house color, or area of the country."
Refurbishing old lawn furniture is super cost effective and looks absolutely stunning with a little work! The benches in this photo, for example, look as if they’ve been used before and just need a little TLC to get back to stunning! Maybe you have some old lawn furniture you weren’t sure what to do with or know of a neighbor who is getting rid of some old stuff. With a little paint or some wood stain, the furniture could easily be reworked into something truly beautiful!
You won’t have to tiptoe around these fantastic plantings. Instead, you can create beautiful pathways through your container garden with these simple, architectural containers. When planning your flowerbeds, simply buy extra plants for accents. These containers were planted with flowers left over from the borders. Not only do the containers look great, but also they tie back into the colors of the adjacent walk.
Although vertical gardening has been a trend in recent years, it’s becoming a permanent shift in how we think about gardening. Using vertical planes obviously makes sense for those who have limited horizontal space — apartment dwellers and condo owners, for example. But even those who have large properties can benefit from new and creative ideas for taking their gardens to lofty heights. Because many people think of vegetables and herbs as belonging in perfectly straight garden rows, it can be difficult to envision more creative approaches to planting them. Here are some fresh vertical gardening ideas to consider trying for yourself.
Contrary to popular belief, not all boxwoods are dark green—nor are they shaped into topiary, or complex geometrical forms, even though the easily can be. A popular choice for container gardens, known as variegated American boxwood (‘Elegantissima’), has green leaves accented with a white color. White violas, highlighting and reinforcing the color of the boxwoods, illuminate this garden corner, and in the larger planters are even mixed in with the boxwoods. Everything is tied together with the consistency of the terra cotta pots. These are simple and natural, and reflect the brick pavers.
Gardeners tend to have lots of landscaping ideas for plants and fewer for their hardscapes (nonplant materials). You can easily add a level of interest to your yard by incorporating a variety of materials. Here, the natural feel of lawn and cut flagstones makes for a delightful contrast against smooth Mexican beach pebbles and gravel. Note how the color of the flagstone mimics that of the beach pebbles and ties the two together; it's an example of using repetition.
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