Hanging baskets follow the same recipe as containers as far as plant care goes. But instead of an upright thriller plant, you want more spillers and fillers—an upright thriller obviously won’t work as well. Calibrachoa in red, purple, and yellow can fill out fast with blooms that look like miniature petunias, so it makes a container overflow with interest quickly. It also covers the container, making the flowers, rather than the container itself, the center of attention. Consider planting calibrachoas by color, or mix them together, depending on your design plan and personal preference. Either way, your hanging baskets with be eye-grabbers.
Revamping your landscape can be a daunting proposition, especially when you want to go about it in DIY fashion. There’s one helpful thing to know before you begin, though, and it will make every piece of landscaping work that follows so much easier. The one thing that everyone wishes they knew before tackling a DIY landscape design project is also the one thing you need to remember: Planning makes perfect.
Landscape petunias—new hybrid petunias that are well suited to growing conditions in the South—are a great choice if you would like to include these wonderful flowers in your container garden plans. All petunias need good drainage, which growing in a pot (with at least one hole in the bottom) provides. Be sure to use a cascading variety for a luxurious planting. Whether your petunias are mounding or trailing, you’ll have flowers that are dense and full and, in most places, in the South, they’ll bloom from early in the spring until late in the fall.
Being a homeowner is a big responsibility, and while there's plenty to take care of inside you home, don't forget about the outside, either. If you've ever looked into the cost of hiring a professional landscaper, you know they're not cheap. Fortunately, there are a slew of inexpensive and affordable DIY landscaping ideas at your disposal, so long as you're willing to get your hands a little dirty. From the front yard to the back, barbeque pits to bistro lights, here are 59 ways you can affordably improve your outdoor space.              

Using sturdy materials like 2 x 4’s and hardware cloth, you can fashion trellises for all of your climbing and vining edibles. Not only will doing this make the plants easier to harvest, but it also allows more room in the ground for vegetables and herbs that tend to bush or clump. Small pumpkins, summer squash, cucumbers, peas, and green beans will love scrambling up the trellis, and they’ll be easier to maintain and harvest when their long vines are elevated.
This is a super cute idea that can be manifested in any sized yard. Even if you have a smaller fence, you can easily create tiny wooden flower boxes out of spare wood or particle board. If you plan on making these garden boxes, you can prevent the wood from becoming soggy from water by lining them or place individual flower pots into the wooden box. You can make these any color you’d like and even mix and match colors and shapes for an even more interesting approach.
Strawberries can be grown in a window box, a pot, or on a balcony. They don’t need more than 12″ soil depth but do need to get at least 6 hours of direct sunlight. Make sure to water them enough to keep the soil moist but not wet. Harvesting strawberries is a little like a treasure hunt, with many at leaf-level but much more hiding down by the soil line. Don’t overlook any!
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Having fresh herbs at home can be much simpler than making a trip to the store. Transplants of cilantro, parsley, and chives are at their best in late winter months, both in containers and in the ground. Plant them in a shallow box, as pictured, and use them as an outdoor centerpiece. They will grow wonderfully well together, and you’ll have as much or as little as you need on-hand for topping a wide range of delectable dishes fresh from oven to table. Label your herbs to be sure which is which, then grab a handful whenever you need one. These raised-bed container gardens should produce plenty to share with family, friends, and neighbors.
Take glorious fall color right up to your door by mixing the blazing tones of orange and yellow with cool shades of purple and blue. First, encircle a copper container with a bittersweet wreath (fresh or faux). To contrast with the orange berries, add ‘Lemon Ball’ sedum and the regal hues of purple cabbage. Spice up the center with ‘Calypso Orange’ ornamental peppers and ‘Cosmic Yellow’ cosmos. Crown the look with a halo of Mexican bush sage. Stack pumpkins on the steps for additional color. Provide full sun and moderate water and the display will flourish through the fall. When it's done, just plant the sedum in your yard to continue the show.
If you're not ready to nix grass completely, consider which grasses naturally grow in your region. "If you plant a grass that is accustomed to your climate, that makes it low maintenance," says Chris. "You can research which grass grows best in your area, and in turn save money on watering, fertilizing, and other maintenance." For instance: In the Northeast — where the couple lives in their Cape Cod home — fescue and ryegrass grow well. Alternatively, in the Southeast, Bermuda grass is a better option.
Planting in layers is an integral part of putting together this stunning container. Though the handmade bowl that makes up the centerpiece of this gorgeous arrangement may look delicate, it’s made of concrete and recycled materials. Its wide shape accommodates many of the same flowers and plants used in the other two 'Romantic Containers,' just in a more whimsical container display that looks like a flourishing flower arrangement. If you select flowers like dianthus, you will certainly be starting this Romantic Tabletop Container with the right colors, tones, and shapes. Its impact will be elegant, and entirely beautiful. Settle in at the table for an evening drink, or a casual conversation, and let the romance blossom.
There is nothing more natural in a landscape than grass. If you’re wanting to save some money on a landscaping idea, try incorporating this natural element into the scene as heavily as possible. Grass doesn’t get enough credit. It’s a gorgeous color, it grows easily and odds are, it’s already existent in your landscape. In this funky scene, stepping stones are used to create an interesting pattern in the grass. The brilliant green just cuts between the stones creating a fun shape that is definitely an eye-catcher.
I never even thought about having a pro do a consultation and design. I always figured if you consulted a pro it was to have them do all the work too which was obviously out of our budget. We designed our own yard plan and I do like it but I could see how a pro would have a more critical eye for details than we did. I will have to keep this in mind when we purchase a larger place someday.

Replacing lawn with a ground cover of rocks or large boulder accents cuts down on upkeep and the need for irrigation. In addition to adding a rugged look to your backyard, sand- or stone-based ground cover can double as a weed suppressor and foundation for stepping stones. Moreover, choose low-maintenance plants, like sedum or succulents, to plant in the rock garden for beautiful contrast.
Consider a Hybrid Approach It's a newer approach but one that Miller finds more and more landscape designers and homeowners using: a combination of professional installation and do-it-yourself landscaping. "Most homeowners either can conquer much more or much less than they think they can," Miller says. "They'll begin a project and get overwhelmed. So you really need to think if you want to spend your next ten weekends breaking your back, or have someone help you."
An easy way to add color in your garden is to integrate potted plantings of annuals. These containers of petunias surround a trellis of climbing vines. Some petunias are grown from seed, and some from cuttings, but all petunias have become move treasured by gardeners in the South. If you choose white petunia, its fragrance will be intoxicating, while if surfinias enhance your garden you’ll be amazed when they bloom all along their stems. Whatever your preference, petunias will beautify your back yard spaces as part of your favorite container gardens.
Mix gravel with rocks of varying sizes to add interest in large areas. This technique also solved a drainage problem. The gravel path, edged on the right with 'Libelle' hydrangea and a bank of maidenhair ferns, straddles a cluster of large, flat stones that creates a bridge over a seasonal runoff channel. Water runs through a pipe hidden beneath the channel's river rocks to a catchment pond at the far end.
Sometimes repetition can be a better approach than difference. Finding a simple planting scheme, then sticking with it until you’ve found the perfect amount of containers to make it beautiful, can lead to simply incredible results. So don’t think that your container garden has to be filled with every type of plant imaginable. Instead, repeat your favorite plants in containers and flowerbeds. You’ll appreciate the simplicity of these simple containers set against the natural stone stairs. Pots of bright purple and yellow violas climb the front steps, seeming to spill over and out into the flowerbeds creating a lush, fluid, yet consistent look.
Tough-as-nails perennials are great when you want plants that can endure difficult back yard conditions. Yellow acorus, lime green euphorbia, purple viola, variegated ivy, and pink Lenten rose make this container pop. If you want to be you’re your containers look their best for the longest, you will want to try a tried-and-true approach. Combine Lenten roses with these three great plants and you will achieve maximum curb appeal, with fantastic durability:
As mentioned previously, using natural elements such as wood and stone are great ways to make an outdoor space feel more close to nature. Since you’d be utilizing elements you’d typically find in nature anyways, these are usually cheaper items you can easily incorporate to any outdoor area. These wooden stumps in the picture make great outdoor patio tables or even side tables, depending on your preference. You could easily find stumps like these in wooded areas or in neighborhoods with a lot of trees if you don’t have them on hand already.

Based on the above, grass that grows on sandy soil must be watered more often than the same grass growing on clay or loam soils. Even after a thorough watering, sandy soils hold little plant-available moisture. They require more frequent irrigation with smaller amounts of water. Conversely, turf growing on a loamy-clay soil can be irrigated less frequently, with larger quantities of water. Watering less often means more efficient water use because of less loss to evaporation. It can also reduce the number of weeds that appear in the lawn.
This deck-top container garden is a study in variation in similarity, proving just how beautiful the simple repetition of a shape or color can be in creating a relaxing outdoor space. Here, three ceramic containers in a subtle shade of turquoise hold a variety of beautiful plants. In the largest pot, working from back to front and tallest to shortest, densely plant 'Liberty Classic Yellow' snapdragon, 'Bouquet Rose Magic' dianthus, and 'Tickled Pink' veronica. Place 'New Look' dusty miller and 'Lemon Ball' sedum in the front to trail over the edge. Pack a powerful, single-note punch in the two smaller pots by planting 'Supertunia Vista Bubblegum' petunia in the midsize container and more sedum in the smallest.
A hardened or toughened lawn, attained through less frequent, deep irrigation, often withstands minor drought and generally has fewer disease problems. It is important, however, that the turf not be allowed to become overly drought-stressed between waterings. This weakens the turf and makes it more susceptible to insect and disease damage and to weed invasion.
Let's hear it for elephant's ear! Its oversize leaves—the secret to this stately combination—create drama through scale. And they allow you to fill in the blanks with tiny, colorful flowers. This arrangement is set in a concrete urn with an aggregate texture to give it a weathered, antiqued finish.  You’ll love how the delicate flowers soften the feel of the urn itself. One of the beautiful wonders of elephant’s ear is that it flowers first, and then fruits. The fruit has been described as making the stem look like corn on the cob. Whatever you think, it looks gorgeous in your summertime container.
If you are looking for a simple but fantastic summer gathering decorating idea, one of the best is to add color to your outdoor party with potted plants. In the heat of the season in the South, there’s no need for a patterned tablecloth here. Potted petunias will add all the beautiful color you need under the glass-top dining table, and make a show stopping, sensational and unexpected addition to your outdoor party décor. These planters have a simple curved wrought-iron base that works well with the simple glass top of the table, but you can match the container to your own personal design and decorating style.
By carefully sculpting the landscape and choosing the right plants and materials, you can hide an unattractive driveway. With only a few steps, that less-than-picture perfect portion of your home can be transformed into a gardener’s paradise. Start by creating a slightly raised island of lawn in the center of the drive. Then, add a low boxwood hedge toward the back of the island with roses, annuals, and perennials rising above the hedge in the front. Blend a variety of colors, textures, and heights for a great look. Try 'Crystal Fairy' rose for height, lamb's ears for texture, and 'Butterfly Deep Rose' pentas for color.
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