Most inexpensive landscape ideas always seem to include little lights – and for a very good reason. You can do so much with outdoor lights these days, and since most of the outdoor lights you find today are LEDs, you can add so much “glow” without putting a huge increase in the electric bill. This is a great way to decorate your front or backyard area and add a level of class and fun. Even better, outdoor lights can remain festive no matter the time of year or approaching season. They just always look great and are party ready for any occasion!

Having fresh herbs on hand means that you can always add beautiful tastes to your home-cooked meals. You can make this simple by planting a tiny kitchen garden in a pot. Easy to create, and simple to maintain, you will love the fragrances and flavors that are contained in this one display of coriander, rosemary, and thyme. Coriander—often called cilantro—is beautiful in salads and salsas. You can choose rosemary according to your flavor preferences since there is one that is even known as ‘Chef’s Choice’. Thyme makes a delicate seasoning. Since you’ll have this all at your fingertips, plan your weekly recipes to take advantage of everything these great herbs can bring to your table.
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Sitting in a natural environment, on a table of weathered wood, this container is a perfect lesson in how to best frame colorful plants with a textured background. These vibrant ‘Molten Orange’ coleuses provide a pop of color among textural grass plantings. Plants with bold but often or predominantly monochrome foliage, such as coleus, can work well in a classically shaped planter such as this one with Roman and Rococo influences. Filling in below the coleus is ivy, its green-and-white leaves spilling over the planter’s natural patina of aged cast iron. Resist the urge to sand or sandblast containers such as these if they are structurally sound—simply brush off any loose debris and leave their history and finish to shine through.
If you need proof that a plain and simple planter has the power to brighten up what could be a dull backyard side table then look right here. This container’s copper sheen complements, rather than competes with, the fuchsia zinnias. Yellow calibrachoas—which look like little petunias—spill over the container’s edge. Then, subtle splashes from purple verbenas create another unexpected yet robust focal point in this outdoor garden conversation space. If you would like your planter to have this beautiful feeling of flow, be sure to select a 'trailing' calibrachoa for this container because it grows lower than the mounding version.

I am trying to discourage cats from leaving “gifts” on my front lawn. Coffee grounds seemed to work, but I need more grounds that we generate daily. I got too aggressive and tried straight vinegar which worked great to discourage the cats, but has killed the beautiful green that we had growing. It has interesting designs where I have used the vinegar. How do I get rid of both the designs and the cat visits?
Mulch is a great addition to a landscape because it adds a finishing touch to gardens and flowerbeds while also locking in moisture and nutrients for the plants. Call your city’s parks department to determine if you have a mulch program in your area. It can give you information on pickup locations and whether there are any caveats, such as residency or limits on the amount of mulch you can take.

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Three years ago, our landscape architect estimated it would cost $25,000 to $30,000 to pay somebody else to implement his plan. By doing most of the work ourselves, we've spent a little over $3,500 on building materials, plants, shrubs, compost, soil, gravel, equipment rental, and the water system.  We haven't tracked our work hours, but our family of four has enjoyed the time outdoors and being together, even if it meant a lot of sweat equity. 

I have never had to personally deal with grubs. And I have yet to encounter an organic grower that has had to deal with them. But I have had many people write to me and ask how to deal with grubs organically. Nearly all of them have mentioned "Last year I sprayed toxic goo to get rid of the grubs and now they're back". While I did not see what happened, my guess is that birds and other natural grub control ate the dead grubs and died. No more natural grub control.
Try planting ground cover in a pot. 'Purple Pixie' loropetalum shrub combines showy pink flowers in spring with deep burgundy evergreen foliage and a pronounced weeping form. As a ground cover, it reaches 1 to 2 feet high and 4 to 5 feet wide. Placed in a container, a 1-gallon plant in a 24-inch-tall pot will completely hide the vessel in just a couple of years. This is a great way to give visual structure to your garden without having to make decisions regarding more formal architectural elements when you prefer to focus on softer, more natural forms.
Your garden will seem wild, and it will certainly be full of life, when you have some 'Tiger' fern (a selection of Boston fern) in your container garden. Pair it with your tulips, Lavender Blue' and 'Purple Wing' Plentifall pansies, acorus, heuchera, and variegated ivy. These simply shaped concrete pots enhance any outdoor environment. Their angled geometry pairs well with the color and movement sprouting out of their tops. Let the plants grow and flow—the containers keep them just where you want them, creating a great harmony of color, and, as they drape over the edges, you’ll see where Plentifall pansies got their name.

Gravel’s earthy texture, its give underfoot, and its crunchy sound are the reasons why this oldest of hardscapes will always be perceived as the softest of paving materials. This gravel entry is a clean casual foil for plant textures and colors. Japanese silver grass billows over the basalt wall at right beside climbing hydrangea. ‘Maori Sunrise’ New Zealand flax in a container punctuates the small pond in the middle while ‘Palace Purple’ heuchera mugho pine and gunnera fill a bed near the house. Cotoneaster spills onto gravel.

Let's hear it for elephant's ear! Its oversize leaves—the secret to this stately combination—create drama through scale. And they allow you to fill in the blanks with tiny, colorful flowers. This arrangement is set in a concrete urn with an aggregate texture to give it a weathered, antiqued finish.  You’ll love how the delicate flowers soften the feel of the urn itself. One of the beautiful wonders of elephant’s ear is that it flowers first, and then fruits. The fruit has been described as making the stem look like corn on the cob. Whatever you think, it looks gorgeous in your summertime container.

My name is J.D. Roth. I started Get Rich Slowly in 2006 to document my personal journey as I dug out of debt. Then I shared while I learned to save and invest. Twelve years later, I've managed to reach early retirement! I'm here to help you master your money — and your life. No scams. No gimmicks. Just smart money advice to help you get rich slowly. Read more.
Attractive landscaping deserves to be seen after hours, which is where landscape lights come into play. The lights play many roles, from adding to the home's attractiveness to illuminating steps and sidewalks for safety to showcasing points of interest in the landscape. Placing lights alongside paths and walkways is one of their most common uses, although that doesn't mean they have to be set in straight lines at prescribed intervals. You can place them on alternate sides of a sidewalk to break up a line.

One way to create a sense of space in a small garden is to put some curves into your garden paths. A slightly meandering walkway is always better than a straight path because it will give visitors the sense that they are traveling through a large landscape. Just be sure to make your path wide enough for two people to walk side by side comfortably. This curved concrete path is especially appealing because a ribbon of tile separates each slab of concrete.

Attractive landscaping deserves to be seen after hours, which is where landscape lights come into play. The lights play many roles, from adding to the home's attractiveness to illuminating steps and sidewalks for safety to showcasing points of interest in the landscape. Placing lights alongside paths and walkways is one of their most common uses, although that doesn't mean they have to be set in straight lines at prescribed intervals. You can place them on alternate sides of a sidewalk to break up a line.
There is nothing more natural in a landscape than grass. If you’re wanting to save some money on a landscaping idea, try incorporating this natural element into the scene as heavily as possible. Grass doesn’t get enough credit. It’s a gorgeous color, it grows easily and odds are, it’s already existent in your landscape. In this funky scene, stepping stones are used to create an interesting pattern in the grass. The brilliant green just cuts between the stones creating a fun shape that is definitely an eye-catcher.
Three truly is the charm—flowers, that is, since the third flower brings together the two prevalent colors in this fantastic container garden arrangement. Simply adding a bicolored viola to this planter is a way to create a bold sense of visual interest while keeping all of the ease of maintaining this container garden. This fantastical planter has a cast relief of a gryphon on its side, bringing a sense of history and drama to the quiet softness of the flowers themselves. When considering this approach to your garden, look for a single planter that can form the centerpiece, and then complete your design around it.

This abundantly rich and vibrant design puts the flowers in the spotlight. These will literally and figuratively be a beautiful sight. Perched atop a painted brick wall, the sleek container is covered by the overflowing blooms, which include sweeping pink petunias, super-delicate baby’s tears, and rounded clusters of rose-pink dianthus. For this arrangement, the focus is entirely on the flowers. In fact, the hidden pot is merely here to offer grounding support. Depending on your design, you may even wish to consider a series of these containers as a way to highlight a garden wall and bring color and emphasis to something you might have always wished to ignore. You won’t have to imagine the beauty—it will be right in front of you.
Three years ago, our landscape architect estimated it would cost $25,000 to $30,000 to pay somebody else to implement his plan. By doing most of the work ourselves, we've spent a little over $3,500 on building materials, plants, shrubs, compost, soil, gravel, equipment rental, and the water system.  We haven't tracked our work hours, but our family of four has enjoyed the time outdoors and being together, even if it meant a lot of sweat equity. 
Don't restrict your do-it-yourself landscaping to plants. Include hardscape features, too. Like evergreens, they provide structure in winter and much more than that. Walls and ​fences make an essential design statement, as they frame your property. When I’m driving around the countryside, I’m constantly struck by how much more “finished” the properties with fences look. Decks and arbors are other important hardscape features. Patios and decks provide transitions from indoors to outdoors.

If you spend any time online, you’ll see planters made from items like cinderblocks, wooden pallets, and rain gutters. Available at home improvement stores, these make very unusual and creative vertical planters. One caveat: When planting edibles, use only new, clean cinderblocks lined with plastic (punch drainage holes into bottom), and wooden pallets that have not been chemically treated.


Whether it's a manicured front lawn, stone-paved pathway or intricate landscape design, landscapes benefit from the same attention to detail that the interior of your home does. Well-executed landscaping ideas can upgrade your home's entire aesthetic, and the right plants, flowers and shrubbery can greatly enhance your curb appeal by adding color, texture and even fragrance to your yard.
Building large retaining walls is not considered a DIY project. If you need a tall wall, chances are you have an erosion problem just waiting to happen and need to call on a professional. By contrast, though, simple terracing jobs are excellent DIY landscaping projects for beginners. After building small stone retaining walls, you can plant behind them, as you would for a raised bed.
My name is J.D. Roth. I started Get Rich Slowly in 2006 to document my personal journey as I dug out of debt. Then I shared while I learned to save and invest. Twelve years later, I've managed to reach early retirement! I'm here to help you master your money — and your life. No scams. No gimmicks. Just smart money advice to help you get rich slowly. Read more.
Very informative article I’m sure that many do-it-yourselfers have gained alot of knowledge from visiting your site. I like that you’ve mentioned about the soil testing that you can have done or do yourself, I’ve found that to be extremely helpful with my lawn care clients that I service. AffordaLawn is the name of my Lawn Service, we service customers in both Missouri and Kansas and doing a soil test along with the first service for new clients have made us alot of happy customers later in the year. Many tell us they’ve never seen their lawns look so good. Kinda makes it easy though when you know what their lawns in need of.
Heat-tolerant geraniums, calibrachoas, and mecardonias in bright red, yellow, and purple shout a welcome in a cheerful way. For the most part, we’ve filled these whitewashed pots to bursting with a single color of each, showing how to create harmony from the variations between each element. This approach works well, creating a single environment for each container, making the task of watering and fertilizing, and sun simple. Whatever plants you choose, make sure they thrive in similar conditions. All three of these plants are heat-tolerant, making them perfect for grouping together.
Using white to lighten your garden is a great way to let the tone of plants themselves be the neutral foundation for the design you build upon. Here several large pots of white impatiens filled to bursting brighten this shady corner with hundreds of blooms. Apart from being filled with one type of plant, these white impatiens are planted in a single style of container—this can help to tie your outdoor space together. If you are planning on planting several different container garden features, consider choosing separate planters for each, or choose a single planter to create a sense of harmony.
Im a student at Reading Memorial High School and I am taking an Entrepreneurship class. For our final project we have to interview an owner of a company and get know how they keep there comapany succesful. I was hoping I could ask you questions about you and your company. It would be greatly appreciated if you respond within the next for days. Thank you for your time
You’ll be phobia-free about welcoming these spiders into your home—spider plants, that is. For this flowing composition that can create color throughout your garden, Red ‘Freida Hemple’ caladiums, a spider plant, and a ‘Little Gem’ Southern magnolia decorate a large pot in the corner. This helps hide a downspout, and fills the space with bright beauty. Working with the idea that repetition creates rhythm, and that builds to a harmonious container garden, smaller pots of the same caladiums tie the grouping together. The boldness of the plants is contrasted with the simple, neutral containers. Think of using natural tones in stone and off-white for these outdoor container compositions.
A woodland backyard near Chicago designed by Hursthouse Landscape Architects and Contractors features pavers and shredded bark. Care was used to respect the existing trees while also creating additional privacy for the homeowners. Plants include Annabelle hydrangeas, Pachysandra 'Green Carpet' ground cover, and Mission Arborvitae evergreen shrubs. 
When creating areas of defined space in your landscape, it’s important to establish and maintain borders. This is key because edging can draw the eye to different areas, keep things looking tidy and organized, and allow you to add some style with your materials of choice. Be sure to check out the Southern Living Plant Collection for border planting ideas.
Tough-as-nails perennials are great when you want plants that can endure difficult back yard conditions. Yellow acorus, lime green euphorbia, purple viola, variegated ivy, and pink Lenten rose make this container pop. If you want to be you’re your containers look their best for the longest, you will want to try a tried-and-true approach. Combine Lenten roses with these three great plants and you will achieve maximum curb appeal, with fantastic durability:
With so much refurbishing and repurposing going on these days, you can pretty much make a cute little garden planter out of anything. Take this wheelbarrow for example, you can use it to fill with actual dirt and seeds, or just use it as a holder for other pots or planters. Not only is it adorable, but it’s a great way to find new life in something either old or just worn down. Again, a little paint or wood stain goes a long way and you can easily recreate this to look fantastic in any landscape.
Using a color palette based on the tones of a tree in the center of the garden, O Plus L blended the interior with the exterior of this California Modernist home in Pacific Palisades known as the Ravoli Estate. This was achieved by using the same surface and flooring materials inside and out and echoing the home's horizontal lines in the backyard.  
Got an old utility or shoe rack lying around? Line the shelves with moss and plant herbs and vegetables to your heart’s content! Either lean the rack against an outside wall, or mount it. Watering tip: Moss drains very quickly, and many gardeners can get frustrated trying to keep their plants properly hydrated. To avoid this, add a layer of plastic with drainage holes below the moss.
When we talk about a rough-and-tumble, resilient plant, this is what we’re thinking of. Crinums laugh at drought, don't need fertilizer, and welcome hot, humid summers with lily-like flowers that perfume the air. Because they grow into huge bulbs over time, they're practically indestructible. If you need a low-maintenance, high-impact flower, this low-fuss lily will be your go-to plant. They come in an array of rainbow hues, ensuring that your yard will be adorned in your favorite vibrant colors. These plants like sun and don’t care much about the sort of soil in which you plant them. We wish more plants were this low-maintenance.
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