I once moved to a house that was infested with both bindweed and thistle. Imagine my yard as a big rectangle. I started pulling weeds on the left and stopped about ten percent of the way across. A few days later, I started at the left again and picked out anything that cropped up in the last few days and then made a little progresss into the rest of the rectangle. Each brief weeding trip gets me another 5% of new territory. The important thing is to always weed the area you already weeded first. If I didn't do it this way, then the weed would recover in the first section while I was attacking another section.

I worry about the fact that you’ve used wood from an old deck in the garden. Wood for decks and play structures until recently was usually pressure-treated with an arsenic solution and is now regarded as toxic. I hope you’ll get the wood tested. It seriously isn’t anything to take lightly. The EPA halted sales of most wood treated this way in 2004, but it had been used for twenty years beforehand. Here’s the EPA website on pressure-treated wood:


Sometimes, it makes good financial sense to call in a pro in order to avoid costly property damage from falling trees or from drainage or erosion problems. Or issues with a driveway or a new gate. And there are cases where calling in a pro simply allows you to avoid backbreaking work (for example, hiring a stump grinder rather than digging out a stump yourself). But calling in a pro does not mean turning over responsibility—Always do some research first, to be as informed as possible.


A backyard landscaping design is more informal than its front-yard counterpart, where elaborate walkways are common. But regardless of whether it's to wend your way between flower beds or vegetable gardens, or to traverse your green grass, you'll probably want to have some sort of informal path cutting through the area. A path of garden stepping stones may be just the right solution.

Consumers are often drawn to mature plants and flowers at the nursery because they’re visually appealing. However, the only difference between a mature plant and a young plant of the same species is the price (tiny seedlings are an exception to this rule, as they can be easily scorched or killed). For instance, you can expect to pay $70 for a 10.25-gallon crape myrtle, but only $20 for a 3.25-gallon crape myrtle. Choose the smaller item for a big cost savings – you may be surprised by how quickly they grow once you’ve planted them.
This sturdy galvanized-metal washtub—a flea market gem—is filled to an overflowing beauty with a hearty mix of lantanas and impatiens. Arranged with maroon Joseph’s coat, green coleus, and yellow creeping Jenny, this dense container was designed to highlight a back porch, or greet guests with its sense of joy and happiness on the front porch just as easily. Coleus varieties were first introduced into Europe in the 1700s, and their popularity remains high today. Given their tropical history, they are not particularly cold hardy, so don’t plan to make them a part of this container too early in the spring.
You’ve seen those tomato planters on TV that grow tomatoes upside down, but for a few dollars you can get into vertical gardening by making your own. Start with a new, clean 5-gallon bucket and, using a utility knife, cut a circle out of the bottom that’s just large enough to feed a small determinate tomato plant through. Add a few smaller holes for drainage, then fill the bucket with potting soil and hang it wherever there’s sun.
A month after we received our plans, a local nursery had a 40%-off “going out of business” sale.  With the designer's list in hand, we were able to purchase about a third of our total plant materials at a substantial discount. We were worried because we weren't anywhere near ready to put them into the ground yet. Fortunately, we live in a mild climate, and the plants survived several months in pots. 
A simple galvanized-metal toolbox is an unexpected container-gardening vessel that fits into an all-natural springtime setup. Here, it showcases a classic arrangement of bright green spearmint, red geraniums, and white sweet alyssums, for a container that feels both light and fresh. You’ll also love how easy it is to move this around the garden thanks to the built-in handle. What you’ll love the most, though, is the rustic charm of the weathered metal contrasting with the soft and subtle colors of the flowers. This is a beautiful study in hard and soft elements in container garden design.

✢ Special price is for first tree and shrub application only and for new tree and shrub residential customers only. The special price applies to installed plant material and shrubs and excludes mature, native and specialty trees such as fruit or certain ornamentals. Application includes up to 5 trees, no more than 25 ft. in height. For the regular tree and shrub application price, please call for an estimate. Not to be combined with or used in conjunction with any other offer or discount for the same service. Consumer responsible for all sales tax.


To create a poinsettia tree, follow these instructions: First, cut the larger blooms, leaving about 6 inches of stem. Sear them quickly to stop sap from dripping out. Sap should bubble under the candle flame, and the ends of the stems will turn black. You may also need to sear the points where larger leaves were removed along the stems. Insert each seared stem into a water-filled florist tube. Stems are hollow and will absorb water after being seared. Place the stems into the base of the ivy topiary. Then repeat this process with the medium-size and smaller poinsettia blooms, cutting the stems so they're about 4 inches long. Insert blossoms into the topiary, working your way toward the top. Once it's complete, care is simple—just add water to the tubes every few days, as needed.
The most important key to this rustic aesthetic is being sure not to overplant the container. You are sure to love the look of this arrangement when you give the flowers space to breathe. This weathered, rusty metal bucket—another incredible flea market find—is studded with periwinkles, the profusely blooming Rieger begonias, coleus, and other annuals. But what it is not is overcrowded, which could keep the plants from getting adequate light. For even more rustic, Southern-inspired charm, try suspending this arrangement on a branch. This will add to the casual, easy-does-it feeling.
Tougher than Clint Eastwood, lantana parties in heat, chortles at drought, and blooms in a slew of sunny colors from spring to fall. Plus, its nectar-laden flowers attract pretty butterflies like moths to a flame. This beautiful plant is native to America, so if you want to focus on plants that will attract or entice wildlife, this can be a good choice. Lantana is also generally resistant to deer—they don’t find it particularly attractive, even though you will. So plant a container or two of this wonderful, durable plant, then sit back and wait for your fluttering-winged visitors to arrive.
A tip for lawn care experts: If you have a good feel for how often your lawn needs watering and it is almost that time and there is a rain shower - maybe a quarter of an inch - that is the BEST time to water your lawn and give it that other 3/4 of an inch. Remember, the grass roots are down deep and most weed roots are near the surface. The idea is to keep the top three inches of soil as dry as you can for as long as you can. That quarter of an inch might make it so that your top three inches is well watered but the lower 9 to 20 inches is on the edge of being pretty dry. This gives the weeds some advantage over your grass!
Dog poop and dog pee are both high in nitrogen. But if you give your lawn too much nitrogen, you'll kill it. Not the whole lawn. Just the spot with too much nitrogen. Usually there will be a load of dog poop and the grass under it will be dead. And the grass immediately around it will be greener, taller, thicker and healthier than all the rest of the lawn. So the stuff immediately under the crap is "too much" and the stuff surrounding the crap is "optimal". Same thing for pee only there won't be a pile of poop in the middle.
We saved thousands going this same route where we hired a landscape architect to create a design. Ours was more like $700 for a 1/4 acre with a lot if detail. We have installed the plan ourselves. The front yard alone would have cost at least $6000 but we were able to create beds, borders, and put in the plantings for only $800 and this took three days of work. So happy we went this route.
Can anyone recommend the necessary amount of time that I should be watering my lawn in Utah? Also, I have small “Bumps” all over my lawn. Could these be caused by some kind of animal? If so, how can I get rid of them. Also, I have some spots in my lawn that WILL NOT grow no matter how much I water or plant seeds etc. Any recommendations would be greatly appreciated.

You should feel encouraged to do the smaller landscaping projects around your home. If you mess something up, just pull it out of the ground and try again. The larger projects that require a little more knowledge and skill are probably best left to the pros, but what you can do is watch them do the project and learn first hand exactly what goes into building a koi pond or a brick paver patio. As you dig around more in your yard and figure some things out, sometime later you will know exactly how to go about the larger projects, and will have a good time planning and completing them.
42. Nothing beats the backyard privacy of your own fence. Before you begin the building process, you'll need to be sure of a few things: Verify your property line, check with your city or township about the limitations and height-restrictions of your fence, have someone from the city come and check for gas lines, and have a neighborly chat with anyone you'll be sharing the fence line with.
If you travel or aren’t available to water your garden easily, the self-watering square planter is a great solution for you. The double-wall design and sub-irrigation systems (encourages root growth) are functional, and the shape and clean lines are fresh and modern so you can group all of them together to make an interesting collection. The water reservoir holds up to 6-1/2 gallons. Approximately 8-gallon soil capacity holds even larger plants!
These porch-step containers begin with bright pink and yellow zinnias—think 'Zowie! Yellow Flame' or 'Magellan Salmon'—which are one of our favorite flowers for their beautiful, round shape. Cooler 'filler' flowers, such as purple verbenas and blue calibrachoas are added to create contrast with texture and color. To make this container garden even simpler, opt for inexpensive plastic planters that are weatherproof and easy to move around. Grouping your containers in a tight space can help to create a homey, mini-garden vibe. Plus, when placed side by side, all of these incredible colors intensify. You’ll love to walk up to these bright wonders.
Don’t forget that your landscape is more than just a way to increase the curb appeal of your home. Indeed, a welcoming landscape is the perfect way to turn it into an inviting outdoor space for family and friends. Incorporate small elements of your personal aesthetic into your design to increase comfort and warmth. It’s perfectly okay to splurge on a couple of items that you absolutely love, especially if the building blocks of your landscape design are both frugal and beautiful.
Adding in a garden structure such as this steel arbor is a great way to incorporate focal pieces into the landscape without having to purchase something really expensive. You could even create your own arbor like this one by using any kinds of scrap metal or piping. Of course, please use caution before deciding to just construct something out of metal. If you have a friend or relative that does metalwork, you could either have them help you create something like this or just buy something handmade. Buying local is always better!

[…] 20 Insanely Clever Gardening Tips And Ideas – 5. Rubbermaid Container Garden – Just because you don’t have much of a yard doesn’t mean you can’t have a nice little garden going. Rubbermaid storage containers are lightweight and just the right size to get you started. Fill the bottom with packing peanuts and a layer of garden fabric to keep them easy to move. This could even work on a small apartment balcony http://www.listotic.com/…… […]

Transforming yards into imaginative outdoor living spaces is what Backyard Designs, Inc does. We approach each project on an individual basis, using space, sound and color to capture the essence of your home. We use Pool Studio 3D design software to make your ideas come to life. This helps you envision exactly what your dreams will loom like in your very own backyard.
There are a lot of vegetable plants that will grow in containers outdoors, making them good choices for apartment gardening. Yes, you can grow veggies on your balcony! Most vegetables will need to be grown in a pot that’s at least 30″ in diameter and has holes for drainage. You’ll need at least 1 foot in depth, plus room for good drainage material, like pebbles or stones. And don’t forget to put something underneath to catch any water. Be a good neighbor as well as a good apartment gardener. Here are a few vegetables that grow well in pots:
Have some broken down furniture you don’t know what to do with? Use them in the garden to create a rustic landscape! You already have the stuff – so you might as well put them to good use. Anything from broken wooden benches, stools or wagon wheels (like the ones depicted) can easily create some character in any sort of garden setting. I can imagine a steer or longhorn skull somewhere in this scene – so if you by chance have one lying around, that could also be used! Don’t go and kill a steer, though. That would defeat the purpose of “refurbishing!”
Here it comes—a beautiful container in the sun, that is. This high-drama, low-maintenance container spotlights 'Variegated Spreading Salmon' SunPatiens, but leaves room for a foxtail asparagus fern and a 6-inch pot of 'Neon' pothos. Everything is set in a glazed-ceramic container, its bright green finish complementing the natural colors of the plantings. This is a beautiful example of the keeping it simple container-garden aesthetic. Let the SunPatiens—a strain that resulted from a cross between a New Guinea hybrids and a wild species—be the bright, central focus of this arrangement. Then, let everything else simply help them shine.  
The moment when flowers burst forth with their vibrant blooms is one of the most exciting times for gardeners…or anyone with a yard, or anyone passing by said yard. A great thing about gardening in the South is that we get treated to colorful flowers, leaves, or berries in every season. We cultivate plants that love our hot summers, our mild winters, and that look great all year. They are fantastic additions to our flowerbeds, and we love the accent that they offer to our front porches, our mailboxes, our flowerbeds, and our backyards. Look for these plants each season:
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