Don’t confuse Plectranthus, or ‘Mona Lavender,’ for the lavender you think of when you imagine the beautiful-smelling plant that fills the fields of Provence. This gorgeous tropical nature shares its beautiful color, but is not the same thing. Use a pot of ‘Mona Lavender’ plectranthus as your container garden to add an unexpected pop of color to any outdoor space. It will brighten the shorter days of fall and add wow to your yard.
Do you live in an apartment? If you do, you may not have any space for a typical garden that you would find in the backyard of a suburban home. But don’t let your tiny space stop you from realizing your dream of having fresh fruits, herbs, and vegetables. All you need to do is create a balcony garden. Read on to learn how to do this, and you’ll be cooking meals with fresh foods in no time.

Even if you don’t necessarily have a green thumb, this is one of the best cheap easy gardening ideas out there! You can easily create bloom boxes out of old wood you have already laying around the house, or even if you have to go out and purchase some, spare wood really isn’t expensive at all. Creating bloom boxes to sit outside windows gives the area a quaint garden look without overpowering the setup, so no matter what size of landscape you’re dealing with, these boxes create just enough charm for any setting.
Bucks County, Pennsylvania landscape architects Dear Garden Associates were tasked with retrofitting existing farm buildings on a property with a new house and lots of land. Slopes that back up to the farmhouse were modified to accommodate terraces, gardens, and paths that link different components of the property. The hardscaping was softened by plants chosen for their flowers and foliage. Among the selections: Purple Smokebush, Mellow Yellow Spiraea, Russian Sage, and Smooth Viburnum.
Grasses and succulents have great textural contrast, so they make the perfect visual and textural combination for a container garden. Begin with something called 'Amazon Mist’ sedge grass—which is not in fact actually a grass at all, but from a different plant family—which then combines wonderfully with creeping sedum and purple echeveria for a container planting that varies in shape, height, texture, and color. Here, the echeveria brings in tones of red, orange, as well as the purple, all of which pick up and play off of similar tones in the sedge. The succulents, low and full, also contrast the sedge’s light, airy, and wavy texture.
Before starting on your new landscape design, survey your area and make some notes; you cannot concretely consider certain landscape decorating ideas unless you identify what kind of climate you are living in, how much you are willing to spend and how much space you have to work with. Additionally, as you browse several landscape ideas and landscape pictures and make notes about the designs and landscapes that really jump out at you, keep in mind what level of ongoing maintenance is actually feasible.
It's easy to create a hodgepodge look when planting if you try to plant one of everything. Avoid that with this gardening idea: Reusing the same colors, shapes, or plant varieties in plantings. Here's a perfect example: To the left of the deck, golden creeping Jenny (Lysimachia nummularia 'Aurea') echoes the color of golden sweet flag (Acorus gramineus 'Ogon'). The sweet flag augments the texture of the blue fescue (Festuca 'Elijah Blue'), which plays off the silvery-blue color of a potted false cypress (Chamaecyparis pisifera 'Baby Blue'). The shape of the false cypress, in turn, is a repeat of the Japanese maple next to the deck.
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