An outdoor room, like the space created under a pergola, can be a welcoming place to mix your containers. This grouping has a lush, vibrant assortment of planters and hanging pots. Combine complimentary colors and plantings to ensure you will have the feeling of a unified, welcoming space that you can settle into on a warm, sun-filled summer afternoon. Hardscaping defines a space for seating under the pergola, which well-placed containers will soften and enhance. Then, sit back and listen to the sweet chirp of birds, watch the butterflies on wing, and enjoy the fragrances from your beautiful container garden.
These projects require not only muscle and time but construction knowledge and experience. You can learn anything from a book or watching a demo, but in real life problems occur. Parts don’t fit, something won’t cooperate, and knowing what to do when the book leaves something out or how to fix a problem when you have made a mistake, is where landscape professionals soar.
If you are looking for a simple but fantastic summer gathering decorating idea, one of the best is to add color to your outdoor party with potted plants. In the heat of the season in the South, there’s no need for a patterned tablecloth here. Potted petunias will add all the beautiful color you need under the glass-top dining table, and make a show stopping, sensational and unexpected addition to your outdoor party décor. These planters have a simple curved wrought-iron base that works well with the simple glass top of the table, but you can match the container to your own personal design and decorating style.
Fences are great for keeping your backyard a private space and away from the eyes of your neighbors. If you have a dog, a fence is a must-have item to keep your dog contained and safe. Choose a fencing style or material that matches your landscaping style, like a rustic post and wire style or a picket fence. Make sure it’s sturdy and has narrow slats so that your dog cant’ get stuck between rails.

This one is especially fun if you have kids that like to spend time wandering around outdoors with your four-legged friend. Consider using plants and other hardscaping features, like tunnels, balance beams, and pipes, to create a fun obstacle course for your dog. This will help him burn off some of his excess energy, even if you don’t have a ton of backyard space.
The above lawn care advice will eliminate 95% to 99% of your weed problem. But there are some weeds that are almost impossible to get rid of, no matter what. Some of these are even resistant to the chemical army. The two to be careful of in my area are BINDWEED (looks like white or pink morning glory) and CANADIAN THISTLE. These two have HUGE root systems that might go as deep as thirty feet into the soil. They spread with rhizomes, just like your grass. The above techniques will discourage them enough to go to your neigbor's instead. They don't like tall grass or mowing. They might try to pop up on fences or other lawn borders. Fifty outcroppings could all be part of the same plant, so you really have to get as much of them as you can. The key is to remove the green plant that provides it with sugar. It needs sun and sugar to support that massive root system. Repeated digging will weaken it to the point that bugs and bacteria can take over.
Landscaping projects suitable for DIY homeowners range from very simple projects anyone can tackle to sophisticated, complex projects that take substantial work and resources. Homeowners seeking a helping hand can follow the instructions in the resource links below, which feature many of the most popular DIY landscaping projects. Because safety should always be of paramount concern, especially when working with power equipment, make sure to refer to the article on Home Safety Tips in the section on Outdoor Living.

MYTH: "If I mow short, it will be longer until I have to mow again." False! Wrong! (SLAP! SLAP! SLAP!) Your grass needs grass blades to do photosynthesis (convert sunshine into sugar) to feed the roots. When you whack the blades off, the grass has to RACE to make more blades to make sugar. It then grows amazingly fast. This fast growth uses up a lot of the grass's stored sugar, and weakens the plant. It is now vulnerable to disease and pests! Tall grass is healthier and can use the extra sugar to make rhizomes (more grass plants) thus thickening the turf. Have you ever noticed that short grass in the summer is always riddled with dead brown patches?

Along with crevices, most gardens have narrow strips that lack soil and moisture. Rather than fighting the conditions, work with them. One of the landscaping ideas you can implement is to plant some tough, vining groundcovers and let them sprawl over the area. Use ivy in shady areas, succulents in sunny spots. A mulch of gravel is a nice low-maintenance addition that keeps plant foliage clean.
Our many beautiful pictures of backyard landscaping ideas are online to inspire you to begin designing the perfect yard layout. Looking at these photos can help you decide upon the types of trees, shrubs, or flowers you wish to plant in your front or backyard. Planting landscaping trees outside your home can add shade as well as beauty to any space. You can even browse our online design galleries to find simple landscaping designs 2017 before and after to see the types of transformations that can take place by the addition of all types of plants.

If you’re not yet color confident, choose one flower you love in a favorite shade, and stick with it. For more texture and interest, add foliage that complements the color of your flowers. In the South, pansies may bloom through the fall and winter in the proper zones, so this can be a great way to bring unexpected color to your garden in your coldest season. Just because you choose a single color, this doesn’t mean you won’t experience variety—just choose strains that will flower the same color.


Combine several English ivy topiaries and a clipped lemon cypress to accent a garden table. You’ll be able to sit down, yet feel as if you are strolling through a classic parterre garden. Mix spirals, globes, columns, and lollipop shapes of varying heights—you’ll love how simple it is to help these topiaries maintain their beautiful shapes. Unify the look by planting everything in terra-cotta pots. We love the flared sides of these clean and simple pots by Campo de' Fiori (campodefiori.com). The topiaries are by Schubert Nursery (schubertnursery.com), and should be readily available at your local garden center.

Hi Scott, although many people think the pH level is wrong when you have moss growing in a lawn. The most common reason for moss growing is a shaded damp area. Without a constantly moist soil, moss will not grow no matter how hard you try. Increasing sunlight, thinning out trees or large shrubs above the moss area and letting the area dry out between watering will help the grass grow and keep down the moss. You will almost never see moss in a sunny area of the lawn no matter what the pH is.
Along with landscape architect Victoria Pakshong of [place], (fer) studio designed a landscape plan for the now-larger property's natural upslope. A railroad-tie path traverses the entire width of the estate, while the driveway—or elongated entry experience—is made of concrete pavers and permeable Grasscrete. The pool and outdoor activity zones are built with an emphasis on the horizontal lines of the property and maintain a low profile so that nothing obstructs that fabulous view.
Divide and Conquer Just because you've come up with a plan doesn't mean it has to be implemented in a single year. In fact, most homeowners should look at an overall vision that's phased in over several years at a minimum, says Miller. To gain the most in curb appeal, start in the front yard and work your way back. Phasing in a project may also allow you to pay for some landscaping tasks in later years while doing some yourself up front.
These amazing large wood slices take the place of your customary stepping stones or stone garden embellishments. These are a funky way to make your garden the focal piece of your backyard. Whether you have a pond area or even just a wide space you need to add some interesting pieces to, using natural elements like wood and stone are great ways to incorporate more nature into the scene. Get as artsy as you please with a conception like this. Add lawn statues or even some gazing balls for added color and texture.
Sometimes your container garden can focus as much on its structures as it does on its plants and flowers. With creative thinking, large pots can be repurposed around your yard. This unused pot fountain was repurposed as an accent table and stand for a cheerful container planting. In a similar vein, low columns can also form pedestals for containers. Look in antique stores, salvage yards, and related locations for unexpected finds that can ground your garden with creativity and history. Then, think outside the container and create new pieces that are uniquely yours.

Go-to grasses and can't-fail lantanas mark the advent of a bright new season. And the coming of fall doesn’t mean the end of container garden beauty. It simply means you have to pay new attention to what needs to be planted—and where. Consider moving your planters indoors; consider plants like fountain grass, which is sun-loving and forgiving; and add in some lantanas, or some sweet potato vines, for color, thrill, and excitement. Focus on your fall containers too. Use bright pops of color, particularly if you plan to bring your containers inside. Or, use a clean neutral, like black, or white, and let the flowers and foliage truly shine. 
Choosing the best plants, grasses, mulches and soil blends all differ by the region you are in.  Typically, local landscapers will have amassed this knowledge over time.  If you’re doing your own landscaping work, you may find conflicting knowledge about what to do simply because different authors live in different areas, and are only familiar with the best practices for their own area.  If you do decide to DIY, be sure to check out sites like WikiLawn Lawn Care and Plant Native that provide locally relevant information, as well as your state’s turfgrass extension.

Thatch is a tight, brown, spongy, organic layer of both living and dead grass roots and stems that accumulates above the soil surface. The interactions among environmental conditions, soil conditions and management practices (irrigation, mowing, fertilization) influence the rate and extent of thatch accumulation. Thatch tends to be a problem on Kentucky bluegrass, bentgrass and fine fescue lawns. It is rarely a problem with tall fescue, wheatgrass, bromegrass or buffalograss. Grass clippings do not contribute to thatch accumulation and should be returned to the lawn during mowing to recycle the nutrients they contain.
A beautiful backyard doesn't have to cost a fortune. With a little effort and a lot of creativity, you can create a professional-level outdoor space at an attainable price point. Think retaining walls for flower beds, pretty garden paths, and bubbling water features. These landscaping ideas for your yard are cheap, easy, and guaranteed to turn heads!
Think of this as the 'other' Lily, meaning not the one 'of the Valley.' Lily-of-the-Nile performs incredibly well in a container, and can say in the same pot for years. It doesn’t mind crowded roots in the least, meaning that this plant will require less maintenance than others might. Lily-of-the-Nile can live in full sun or light shade, so you’ll have great choices for where you can locate your containers. Given their range of incredible blue shades, these look beautiful near pools. Some named types may eventually grow to be as tall as three feet.
42. Nothing beats the backyard privacy of your own fence. Before you begin the building process, you'll need to be sure of a few things: Verify your property line, check with your city or township about the limitations and height-restrictions of your fence, have someone from the city come and check for gas lines, and have a neighborly chat with anyone you'll be sharing the fence line with.
Use unique containers like vintage wooden boxes and buckets is a great way to bring harmony and symmetry to any container gardens. Since these are not designed with planting in mind, to make them function well be sure to drill drainage holes in each before planting. For a new take on the living and eating local approach, this variety of planters is filled with a mix of simple to grow and harvest edibles, like lettuce, and decoratives, like marigolds and geraniums. How better to bring the useful and the beautiful together in one simple, enjoyable idea—container gardening?

Heat-tolerant geraniums, calibrachoas, and mecardonias in bright red, yellow, and purple shout a welcome in a cheerful way. For the most part, we’ve filled these whitewashed pots to bursting with a single color of each, showing how to create harmony from the variations between each element. This approach works well, creating a single environment for each container, making the task of watering and fertilizing, and sun simple. Whatever plants you choose, make sure they thrive in similar conditions. All three of these plants are heat-tolerant, making them perfect for grouping together.

Red Dragon Rice grows tall, leafy spindles that can add touches of color to a simple container garden setting. Here, a chicken feeder planted with ‘Red Dragon’ rice makes a novel addition to this deck railing. Red dragon rice requires a high degree of moisture, and it does not tolerate cold at all, so consider this plant an annual. And while it is colorful and beautiful, it also should be planted judiciously. Red dragon rice is considered a serious weed in rice-growing areas. However, it is okay to plant it elsewhere.
Have kids? Or pets? Don't be afraid to give artificial grass a shot. "People always ask how to make a yard dog-proof and kid-proof, but there's no way because they're going to run around and tear up your grass," says Chris. "But if you give them an artificial grass area to play on, they won't wreak havoc on the rest of your yard." Plus, it requires zero upkeep on the weekends.
Southerners used to have to choose between geraniums that could handle high temperatures and humidity and those that produced lots of flowers. But this sad state of either-or is no more since Calliope-series geraniums were developed to offer the best of both worlds. This one's called 'Dark Red,' and it forms the centerpiece of a container filled to bursting with bright color and subtle greenery. Here, the filler forms a backdrop to the bold geraniums, and bring height, while the weathered container gives a sense of contrast against the masonry-and-mortar design elements of the courtyard. Let these geraniums burst forth with color in your Southern garden—temperature and humidity are no problem at all!

You don’t need to hire an architect or professional landscaper to get some interesting layout designs. With a little research and the help from photos like this one, you can easily see some ideas and recreate them to fit your own specifications. Cut out shapes in planters and sidewalk areas can offer an interesting yard focal point or even add to an already existing design. Use your imagination and cut shapes out to fit into your lawn via garden beds or even gravel and rocks.
When we talk about a rough-and-tumble, resilient plant, this is what we’re thinking of. Crinums laugh at drought, don't need fertilizer, and welcome hot, humid summers with lily-like flowers that perfume the air. Because they grow into huge bulbs over time, they're practically indestructible. If you need a low-maintenance, high-impact flower, this low-fuss lily will be your go-to plant. They come in an array of rainbow hues, ensuring that your yard will be adorned in your favorite vibrant colors. These plants like sun and don’t care much about the sort of soil in which you plant them. We wish more plants were this low-maintenance.
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