Your garden is a palette for your creativity, and garden design is your paintbrush. One of the best ways to create a beautiful composition is to hang your baskets in unexpected places. This container is a medley of plants that grow in various shapes and to various heights, creating their own unique array of delights. A hook installed in a tree branch holds this basket featuring a sensational combination of plants that will work wonderfully in the shade. You’ll love the way many of them spill over the basket and drape in the wind.
My soil was only half an inch deep. Even weeds had a tough time growing. Below my half inch of soil was huge river rocks seperated by smaller rocks, sperated by sand. It bore no resemblance to soil. I added four inches of topsoil. This was done with two dumptruck loads at $100 a pop. It covered all of the weeds with enough soil that they could not work through - I could start from scratch with my grass seed of choice!

You’ll definitely feel the power of gold when you combine the beauty of these three containers in your garden. These bright blooms of 'Ogon' golden sweet flag, 'Matrix Yellow Blotch' pansies, and 'Penny Clear Yellow' violas will make your pots and flowerbeds glow. Choose containers of similar materials but varying heights to create visual interest, and then tie everything together through the use of the shared tones of your plants. You will love how bright and bold these flowers are. You can add in height by including a grass in one of the plants if you like, or mix in some filler should you wish.
Gravel’s earthy texture, its give underfoot, and its crunchy sound are the reasons why this oldest of hardscapes will always be perceived as the softest of paving materials. This gravel entry is a clean casual foil for plant textures and colors. Japanese silver grass billows over the basalt wall at right beside climbing hydrangea. ‘Maori Sunrise’ New Zealand flax in a container punctuates the small pond in the middle while ‘Palace Purple’ heuchera mugho pine and gunnera fill a bed near the house. Cotoneaster spills onto gravel.
Along with landscape architect Victoria Pakshong of [place], (fer) studio designed a landscape plan for the now-larger property's natural upslope. A railroad-tie path traverses the entire width of the estate, while the driveway—or elongated entry experience—is made of concrete pavers and permeable Grasscrete. The pool and outdoor activity zones are built with an emphasis on the horizontal lines of the property and maintain a low profile so that nothing obstructs that fabulous view.

Weed and feed. lightly water lawn before applying, so fertilizer sticks to the leaves of the clover. Dandelion, clover, plantain are broadleaf weeds. The best time to apply a general-purpose broadleaf herbicide for the control of perennial broadleaf weeds such as dandelion, plantain, and clover is early September to early November. As winter approaches, perennial broadleaf weeds are storing energy reserves in stems and roots; a fall-applied herbicide will enter the plant and travel to these plant parts with the food reserves. The second best time is in the late spring or early summer period after the weeds have flowered. If applying in the late spring, be extremely cautious with these herbicides near ornamentals, trees, flowers, and vegetable gardens because these plants can be damaged by these herbicides through direct application, drift, and/or volatilization (the herbicide turns into a vapor). This is another reason why we prefer to apply these herbicides in the fall.


There’s just something about pools and rock gardens that sync so well together. Pool areas can be a bit expensive to maintain, so in order to add some creative flair without having to spend a lot of money, use items you have on hand. If you have a pre-existing garden, odds are you have some garden rocks or stones that could easily be transformed and used in a funky rock garden like this one depicted. Since this is a pool area, you’d want to steer clear from using tiny stones or pebbles since these could make their way into the pool easier.
Kris and I have done a lot of work on this house and yard. We’ve done some of this ourselves, but we’ve also opted to pay others to do certain tasks. As I mentioned earlier this summer, we just paid to have work done on our electrical system. I’m okay wiring an outlet or a switch, but I didn’t feel comfortable replacing the old knob-and-tube wiring.
Owner, architect, and site merged a design from their mutual association with the river. Located on the edge of Goose Creek, the owner was drawn to the site, reminiscent of a river from his youth that he used to tube down with friends and a 6-pack of beer. The architect, although growing up a country way, had similar memories along the water. Design gains momentum from conversations of built forms they recall floating along: mills and industrial compounds lining waterways that once acted as their lifeline. The common memories of floating past stone abutments and looking up at timber trussed bridges from below inform the interior. The concept extends into the hardscape in piers, and terraces that recall those partial elements remaining in and around the river.

Strawberries can be grown in a window box, a pot, or on a balcony. They don’t need more than 12″ soil depth but do need to get at least 6 hours of direct sunlight. Make sure to water them enough to keep the soil moist but not wet. Harvesting strawberries is a little like a treasure hunt, with many at leaf-level but much more hiding down by the soil line. Don’t overlook any!
If you're anything like us, you know that it's not just the inside that counts—when it comes to houses, that is! Accenting your home with natural elements, from flora and fauna to stonework and water features, makes for an instantly inviting space for guests (and not to mention a restful retreat for you!). Let these outdoor design ideas for shrubbery, walkways, and more inspire you to create your own beautiful backyard garden or front lawn oasis.
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