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Now let's look at the compost: compost is wonderful, magical stuff. But in this case, you've just added nitrogen to an excess nitrogen problem. Further, seeds don't germinate well in a high nitrogen medium like compost. The germinate better in something like pH adjusted peat moss. Or plain topsoil. The plants like nitrogen after they've gotten past the seedling stage.
Outdoor fairy lights can be bought online all year around and they're a quick, simple and cheap way to bring a pretty glow to a patio and beyond. You can arrange them through tree or shrub branches, attach them to fences and furniture, or suspend them from canes stuck into the ground. They can be run from a plug inside the house, so you don't need an electrician.
Sit back and imagine this classic cast-metal urn in a dreamy garden or on a light-filled screened porch. The urn itself is styled with classic Victorian lines, giving it a romantic element, but it is the arrangement that truly makes it magical. The key to designing this look is combining contrasting textures. Here, grassy cordyline, puffy pink dianthus, sweeping ‘Ace of Spades’ sweet potato vine, dainty blue lobelia, and spires of pink angelonia all come together in a cascade and crescendo of bright color and loud celebration. Set against the beautiful shape, but simple monochrome tone, of the vase, this creates a show-stopping container for your home garden.
Mary McCoy, LMSW is a licensed social worker who works closely with individuals, families, and organizations in crisis. She knows first-hand how financial choices can prevent and mitigate crises, and she's therefore passionate about equipping people with the information they need to make solid financial decisions for themselves and their loved ones. When Mary isn't on her soap box, you can find her hiking, jogging, yoga-ing, or frolicking with her family.
Nothing could be more relaxing than enjoying a cup of coffee in the morning surrounded by the lush greenery of your backyard refuge or taking a well-deserved break in the evening after a long days work in your own garden sanctuary.  Whether you are searching for front yard garden ideas or a lush exterior remodel, remember that creating a unique landscape is quite easy when you are given the correct tools and ideas to learn how to plan your new space.  Begin by looking for pictures of landscaping plants if you are unsure of how a particular variety will fill out your area and then review pros cons of your flower and plant options in order to choose the best varieties for your space.
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You can contain a garden that’s simple and beautiful with a raised planter on wheels. It’s ideal for gardening in small spaces or if you have limited mobility. This raised planter is ergonomically designed and convenient to reach from all sides. It creates a waist-high garden that eliminates bending. Plus, the height prevents weed seeds from blowing in and helps keep critters out. If you’re worried about the planter moving, don’t be. The 2 non-wheeled legs are firm to the ground so it will remain stationary. The raised planter will make a great addition to your apartment’s balcony.
You don’t have to get out the clippers, although should the mood strike, you can train and topiary these boxwoods into any shape that you like. Potted boxwoods offer the beauty of formal elegance with the simplicity of little maintenance. In general, boxwoods can be drought tolerant, and you won’t have to fertilize them too often. This large American variety creates a living wall in a line of concrete planters—a process helped by planting the boxwoods in identical planters at the same time. Use a few simple tips and tricks to make your boxwood container garden easy to maintain, but even easier and more beautiful to behold.

Hanging baskets follow the same recipe as containers as far as plant care goes. But instead of an upright thriller plant, you want more spillers and fillers—an upright thriller obviously won’t work as well. Calibrachoa in red, purple, and yellow can fill out fast with blooms that look like miniature petunias, so it makes a container overflow with interest quickly. It also covers the container, making the flowers, rather than the container itself, the center of attention. Consider planting calibrachoas by color, or mix them together, depending on your design plan and personal preference. Either way, your hanging baskets with be eye-grabbers.
Although they may not be the first thing that come to mind, don’t ignore edibles when selecting your planting materials. Different varieties of lettuce have beautiful color and texture, and can add both visual interest and an unexpected kitchen surprise to your container garden. Here, several leafy edibles mix with violas and mums. These leafy greens will be a surprise to people who wonder what is creating the beautiful colors in your containers—and you’ll be just as surprised if you choose to let them be the centerpiece of something on your dinner plate.
A pool area can be tricky to repurpose, so be careful not to get too tacky. Using things you have on hand is key when trying to save money. By creating raised beds around the pool area, you add an interesting conception of height and texture. Add deep green plants or your favorite flowering bushes to create this natural element that is both beautiful and relaxing. If you have extra wood on hand, you could easily create some fun garden boxes to place in the corners around the pool area. Your pool area would be barbecue ready in no time.
Use unique containers like vintage wooden boxes and buckets is a great way to bring harmony and symmetry to any container gardens. Since these are not designed with planting in mind, to make them function well be sure to drill drainage holes in each before planting. For a new take on the living and eating local approach, this variety of planters is filled with a mix of simple to grow and harvest edibles, like lettuce, and decoratives, like marigolds and geraniums. How better to bring the useful and the beautiful together in one simple, enjoyable idea—container gardening?
You may not have the space or patience to become a master gardener, but anyone can master container gardening. It’s a cinch—all you need is a container (a planter in true gardener speak), potting soil, some plants and you’re ready to go. Thinking of container gardening like this, it’s easy to see why container gardening ideas can be endless—so endless that you may need a few container garden ideas to point you and your pots in the right direction. From fall container gardening to hanging container gardening and even indoor container gardening—we’ve got tons of container garden ideas for you. With our ideas, you’ll be inspired to dirty your hands and spruce up your porch or patio with some pretty container gardens in no time. 
For a late-summer container that steals the show, make bold foliage the focal point. This easy-care, end-of-season planter uses vibrant 'Rustic Orange' coleus (Solenostemon scutellarioides), identified by its rusty-hued leaves that will last until the first frost. The filler in this space-saving pot is 'Compact Hot Coral' SunPatiens (Impatiens sp.), which has tiny tangerine blooms and dark, shiny leaves that contrast nicely with the bronze-toned coleus. Finally, 'Yellow Moon' wishbone flower (Torenia sp.) adds even more lush greenery to the arrangement and offers petite yellow petals with purple throats. This is a thirsty container, so you'll need to make sure it stays well watered. Place it in full sun or partial shade.
A backyard is an extension of what's going on inside our home, maybe more colorful, casual, fun, and without a ceiling to put a lid on our needs and desires. In a yard, trees and vines can climb to their ultimate heights, light and weather can quickly change, and the possibilities—within the confines of our property lines—are up to the terrain, our design skills, and our do-it-yourself know-how. 
By carefully sculpting the landscape and choosing the right plants and materials, you can hide an unattractive driveway. With only a few steps, that less-than-picture perfect portion of your home can be transformed into a gardener’s paradise. Start by creating a slightly raised island of lawn in the center of the drive. Then, add a low boxwood hedge toward the back of the island with roses, annuals, and perennials rising above the hedge in the front. Blend a variety of colors, textures, and heights for a great look. Try 'Crystal Fairy' rose for height, lamb's ears for texture, and 'Butterfly Deep Rose' pentas for color.
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