Go-to grasses and can't-fail lantanas mark the advent of a bright new season. And the coming of fall doesn’t mean the end of container garden beauty. It simply means you have to pay new attention to what needs to be planted—and where. Consider moving your planters indoors; consider plants like fountain grass, which is sun-loving and forgiving; and add in some lantanas, or some sweet potato vines, for color, thrill, and excitement. Focus on your fall containers too. Use bright pops of color, particularly if you plan to bring your containers inside. Or, use a clean neutral, like black, or white, and let the flowers and foliage truly shine. 
Bucks County, Pennsylvania landscape architects Dear Garden Associates were tasked with retrofitting existing farm buildings on a property with a new house and lots of land. Slopes that back up to the farmhouse were modified to accommodate terraces, gardens, and paths that link different components of the property. The hardscaping was softened by plants chosen for their flowers and foliage. Among the selections: Purple Smokebush, Mellow Yellow Spiraea, Russian Sage, and Smooth Viburnum.

Prized for both its flavor and its aroma, mint can be an incredible herb to have growing in a garden container. What’s more, its bright green leaves can bring in a pop of color. Left uncontrolled, however, mint can have a tendency to overrun an outdoor space. With this in mind, you will want to keep more invasive herbs, like mints, contained in pots in your kitchen garden. Pick your mint based on the flavor you want and whether you’d prefer it for tea or for flavoring food—you’ll be thrilled by mint’s wondrous varieties.


Take glorious fall color right up to your door by mixing the blazing tones of orange and yellow with cool shades of purple and blue. First, encircle a copper container with a bittersweet wreath (fresh or faux). To contrast with the orange berries, add ‘Lemon Ball’ sedum and the regal hues of purple cabbage. Spice up the center with ‘Calypso Orange’ ornamental peppers and ‘Cosmic Yellow’ cosmos. Crown the look with a halo of Mexican bush sage. Stack pumpkins on the steps for additional color. Provide full sun and moderate water and the display will flourish through the fall. When it's done, just plant the sedum in your yard to continue the show.
With a raised garden bed or table, you can enjoy comfortable gardening nearly anywhere. And the best part is, it won’t take up a lot of space. The sturdy raised planter’s V-Shaped design allows you to grow deep-rooted vegetables like tomatoes in the center, with shallow-rooted plants around the edges. The comfortable waist-high working height allows you to tend your garden without bending or kneeling. Having an elevated gardening table can also help to reduce the number of weeds and ground pests that afflict standard gardens. The wood raised garden table is crafted of plantation-grown fir so it’s built to last!
Have some broken down furniture you don’t know what to do with? Use them in the garden to create a rustic landscape! You already have the stuff – so you might as well put them to good use. Anything from broken wooden benches, stools or wagon wheels (like the ones depicted) can easily create some character in any sort of garden setting. I can imagine a steer or longhorn skull somewhere in this scene – so if you by chance have one lying around, that could also be used! Don’t go and kill a steer, though. That would defeat the purpose of “refurbishing!”
One of the most exciting ways to create a boxwood garden is to make subtle changes to varieties of the same plant. For this design, English boxwoods growing in the ground surround a terra-cotta pot planted with an American boxwood. When planning your boxwood garden, particularly if you plan to use containers, be sure that they will be well drained, and that they can be kept fungus-free. Also, Southern gardeners face specific challenges: Choose boxwoods that are best suited for hot and humid climates; be aware of insects that may wreak havoc on boxwoods; and check your site’s exposure before planting. Follow these simple steps and you will reap the rewards of a beautiful boxwood container garden.

American men spend their days and much of their evenings in office and retail jobs that can be grinding and exhausting, even though they don’t entail physical labor. To say that they do not want to (and sometimes cannot) do the heavy work that Mexican immigrants hire out to do is not racist; it states a fact. Not because they’re lazy, but because one job is generally enough for a man.
Tough-as-nails perennials are great when you want plants that can endure difficult back yard conditions. Yellow acorus, lime green euphorbia, purple viola, variegated ivy, and pink Lenten rose make this container pop. If you want to be you’re your containers look their best for the longest, you will want to try a tried-and-true approach. Combine Lenten roses with these three great plants and you will achieve maximum curb appeal, with fantastic durability:
Here in AZ, we hire Mexican immigrants when we can, although a…well, let’s use the word: racist program to push them out of the country is in full swing. I’ve found them to be hard workers, sometimes amazingly skilled, and usually honest. I try not to pay them slave wages, even though they sometimes offer to work for that. A man (or a woman!) should be paid an honest wage for honest labor.
DANDELIONS are a sign of alkaline soil. Refer to the pH stuff above. They can also indicate compacted or poor soil. The above methods will prevent dandelions from propogating. Since dandelions live about five years, the mature dandelions will struggle with the tall, thick turf and die off in two to three years. I now think that a few dandelions poking up once in a while are kinda nice and I leave them alone.

Go-to grasses and can't-fail lantanas mark the advent of a bright new season. And the coming of fall doesn’t mean the end of container garden beauty. It simply means you have to pay new attention to what needs to be planted—and where. Consider moving your planters indoors; consider plants like fountain grass, which is sun-loving and forgiving; and add in some lantanas, or some sweet potato vines, for color, thrill, and excitement. Focus on your fall containers too. Use bright pops of color, particularly if you plan to bring your containers inside. Or, use a clean neutral, like black, or white, and let the flowers and foliage truly shine. 
Container gardening is an easy and fantastic way to add a bit of pizzazz to your backyard, especially if it's on the smaller side. While container gardening may sound like a lot of work, you can minimize upkeep and the frequency of re-potting with the right plant and pot choices. Low-maintenance cacti and succulents are obvious options, but perennials, herbs, and shrubs can also thrive in a container. As for pots, choose something larger (colorful or sculptural pots also add personality) and a good potting soil mix specifically made for container plants. Overwintering your pots is also a possibility provided the pot is frost-resistant.
Hanging baskets follow the same recipe as containers as far as plant care goes. But instead of an upright thriller plant, you want more spillers and fillers—an upright thriller obviously won’t work as well. Calibrachoa in red, purple, and yellow can fill out fast with blooms that look like miniature petunias, so it makes a container overflow with interest quickly. It also covers the container, making the flowers, rather than the container itself, the center of attention. Consider planting calibrachoas by color, or mix them together, depending on your design plan and personal preference. Either way, your hanging baskets with be eye-grabbers.
If you make the perfect plant selection for your container garden, no summer will see you shedding tears over a poor selection of plants. Instead, great growers like these Mini Cascade ivy geraniums will take the South’s harsh summer heat and just keep on blooming. Geraniums work wonders as part of a hanging container garden, blossoming to a rich, full, and verdant cascade of flowers spilling over and out of their planters. You’ll be excited by the rush of color, but even more thrilled with how simple these Cascading Geraniums are to maintain.

When it comes to paths and patios, gravel is a much more affordable surface than paving. To lay it in place; mark out the area, then scrape away loose soil or grass, pin down a permeable membrane to stop the weeds coming through and spread the gravel over it. Aim for a depth of 2.5cm. Choose a pale gravel, like Honey Stone, to contrast with your lawn and planting. A large bag will cover around 20 sq metres.


Flowers don’t have to grow at ground level. Get face-to-face with your containers by literally putting them up on a pedestal! These columned containers consist of coco-fiber baskets atop steel posts. Eventually the plantings will grow over the containers and obscure them completely, leaving the plants to float over the steel pedestals. For this garden, sleek geometric poles provide an elegant contrast to the wild excitement of the plants, but you may choose a style of pedestal that complements whatever design aesthetic you prefer for your personal style. Simply top it with a suitable container, and enjoy the visual variation your container garden creates.
The most important key to this rustic aesthetic is being sure not to overplant the container. You are sure to love the look of this arrangement when you give the flowers space to breathe. This weathered, rusty metal bucket—another incredible flea market find—is studded with periwinkles, the profusely blooming Rieger begonias, coleus, and other annuals. But what it is not is overcrowded, which could keep the plants from getting adequate light. For even more rustic, Southern-inspired charm, try suspending this arrangement on a branch. This will add to the casual, easy-does-it feeling.
Caladiums are one of the most popular plants in the South for creating beauty in difficult-to-grow-in shady places. Caladiums—a tropical plant native to America—have incredibly colored foliage that can have blotches of red, rose, pink, white, and more. Some of our favorite caladiums include ‘Pink Symphony,’ ‘Iceberg,’ ‘Miss Muffet,’ and ‘Candyland.’ To bring this beautiful plant into your landscaping plan easily, integrate planters into your hardscape. This poolside scene includes a trough-like container built right into the bank. Fill it with a colorful array of caladiums and you will have created your own personal poolside tropical oasis.
A terrace like this grass terrace depicted is super great if you have a strange pool side are you’d like to fill. There are plenty of cheap pool landscaping ideas out there, but this one is extra interesting because it adds so much texture to the scene. You don’t have to just use different kinds of shrubs or grass in a terrace like this. You could easily make it a tropical paradise with gorgeous flowers, interesting lawn statues and tropical plants. The sky’s the limit with a stacked terrace like this!
Outdoor fairy lights can be bought online all year around and they're a quick, simple and cheap way to bring a pretty glow to a patio and beyond. You can arrange them through tree or shrub branches, attach them to fences and furniture, or suspend them from canes stuck into the ground. They can be run from a plug inside the house, so you don't need an electrician.
On the other hand, an easy-maintenance ground cover is a great and cost-effective alternative to grass. Thyme, bishop’s weed, and lamium spread quickly over room-sized sections of a front and back lawn, and remain hearty through temperature and drought swings. Simply plant around 10 creeping ground cover plants (more if you want faster coverage or you’re dealing with an area larger than a bedroom) for between $5 and $10 each. They should quickly germinate and take over portions of your yard with beautiful leaves and flowers.
Wooden pallets can easily be turned into super great compost bins! Instead of trying to create some sort of landscape design or layout, compost bins may be the best use of the land for the garden centric person. Wooden pallets can also be made into garden boxes, so really, having wooden pallets on-hand for any gardener would be the best situation. This just goes to show how versatile wooden pallets are and how handy they are when it comes to gardening.
There are do-it-yourself kits available from some lawn care services or lawn and garden shops. The cooperative extension offices in many states will also test soil for free or for a low fee. Private companies also provide kits and testing for a fee. Once you get the results returned, you will see what you may need to add to the soil in order to get the lawn of your dreams.
I once moved to a house that was infested with both bindweed and thistle. Imagine my yard as a big rectangle. I started pulling weeds on the left and stopped about ten percent of the way across. A few days later, I started at the left again and picked out anything that cropped up in the last few days and then made a little progresss into the rest of the rectangle. Each brief weeding trip gets me another 5% of new territory. The important thing is to always weed the area you already weeded first. If I didn't do it this way, then the weed would recover in the first section while I was attacking another section.
If you're anything like us, you know that it's not just the inside that counts—when it comes to houses, that is! Accenting your home with natural elements, from flora and fauna to stonework and water features, makes for an instantly inviting space for guests (and not to mention a restful retreat for you!). Let these outdoor design ideas for shrubbery, walkways, and more inspire you to create your own beautiful backyard garden or front lawn oasis.
×