Mary McCoy, LMSW is a licensed social worker who works closely with individuals, families, and organizations in crisis. She knows first-hand how financial choices can prevent and mitigate crises, and she's therefore passionate about equipping people with the information they need to make solid financial decisions for themselves and their loved ones. When Mary isn't on her soap box, you can find her hiking, jogging, yoga-ing, or frolicking with her family.
A month after we received our plans, a local nursery had a 40%-off “going out of business” sale.  With the designer's list in hand, we were able to purchase about a third of our total plant materials at a substantial discount. We were worried because we weren't anywhere near ready to put them into the ground yet. Fortunately, we live in a mild climate, and the plants survived several months in pots. 
You’ve seen those tomato planters on TV that grow tomatoes upside down, but for a few dollars you can get into vertical gardening by making your own. Start with a new, clean 5-gallon bucket and, using a utility knife, cut a circle out of the bottom that’s just large enough to feed a small determinate tomato plant through. Add a few smaller holes for drainage, then fill the bucket with potting soil and hang it wherever there’s sun.

While many of you know something about gardening, the subject of lawn care may be another thing altogether. Let us help with that. Our lawn care section can help answer questions about various types of grass and how to grow them, common lawn issues, alternative solutions and general lawn care. Don’t let questions become a burden to your piece of mind. Instead, get the answers and use the lawn care tips and information provided as a guide to growing a healthy, lush carpet of grass that will make others green with envy.

Go-to grasses and can't-fail lantanas mark the advent of a bright new season. And the coming of fall doesn’t mean the end of container garden beauty. It simply means you have to pay new attention to what needs to be planted—and where. Consider moving your planters indoors; consider plants like fountain grass, which is sun-loving and forgiving; and add in some lantanas, or some sweet potato vines, for color, thrill, and excitement. Focus on your fall containers too. Use bright pops of color, particularly if you plan to bring your containers inside. Or, use a clean neutral, like black, or white, and let the flowers and foliage truly shine. 

By carefully sculpting the landscape and choosing the right plants and materials, you can hide an unattractive driveway. With only a few steps, that less-than-picture perfect portion of your home can be transformed into a gardener’s paradise. Start by creating a slightly raised island of lawn in the center of the drive. Then, add a low boxwood hedge toward the back of the island with roses, annuals, and perennials rising above the hedge in the front. Blend a variety of colors, textures, and heights for a great look. Try 'Crystal Fairy' rose for height, lamb's ears for texture, and 'Butterfly Deep Rose' pentas for color.

If it's evident that your backyard remodel or update can't be a DIY project, hire a landscape designer or architect to help your outdoor space realize its potential. A skilled professional can guide you through the process of figuring out a style, deciding who will be using the yard, creating zones of activity, choosing materials and plants, and recommending builders and contractors for everything from swimming pools to outdoor structures to installing irrigation.


Fences are great for keeping your backyard a private space and away from the eyes of your neighbors. If you have a dog, a fence is a must-have item to keep your dog contained and safe. Choose a fencing style or material that matches your landscaping style, like a rustic post and wire style or a picket fence. Make sure it’s sturdy and has narrow slats so that your dog cant’ get stuck between rails.
You may not have the space or patience to become a master gardener, but anyone can master container gardening. It’s a cinch—all you need is a container (a planter in true gardener speak), potting soil, some plants and you’re ready to go. Thinking of container gardening like this, it’s easy to see why container gardening ideas can be endless—so endless that you may need a few container garden ideas to point you and your pots in the right direction. From fall container gardening to hanging container gardening and even indoor container gardening—we’ve got tons of container garden ideas for you. With our ideas, you’ll be inspired to dirty your hands and spruce up your porch or patio with some pretty container gardens in no time. 
I just had my yard aerated two days ago and the temperatures went from 70 to 45 degrees. Before I had the lawn aerated I raked up the leaves. Now since the lawn was aerated my neighbors leaves have blown over in my lawn. Is it two late in the season to plant grass seeds? If so, can I just spread the seeds directly on the leaves? Or would it be in my best interest to wait until early spring 2012?
If you don’t necessarily want to use old tires as planters, why not try creating your very own fish pond? Well, the fish could be completely optional, but turning a tire into a pond is super simple and a really great way to add some interesting elements into a garden scape. Even better, they are so cheap! If you don’t have any used tires on hand, you can easily find tires at junk yards or garage sales. Creating your own tire pond could be a fun, quick and cheap way to liven up your landscape.
[…] 20 Insanely Clever Gardening Tips And Ideas – 5. Rubbermaid Container Garden – Just because you don’t have much of a yard doesn’t mean you can’t have a nice little garden going. Rubbermaid storage containers are lightweight and just the right size to get you started. Fill the bottom with packing peanuts and a layer of garden fabric to keep them easy to move. This could even work on a small apartment balcony http://www.listotic.com/…… […]

Container gardens are perfect ways to highlight the elegance of simplicity. This succulent garden is a perfect example of having individual plantings in single containers, allowing each to reflect its unique leaf shape and form complemented by the architecture of the container. Using various decorative ground covers jazzes up your potted plantings—these are enhanced with beautiful selections of natural stone. The highlight of this design is a potted blue agave surrounded by pebbles serves as a living sculpture on this deck. The smooth stones inside the container reflect the larger stones around its base, creating a synthesis of inside and out.

Developer Joseph Eichler's name has become associated with the Midcentury Modern California housing tracts that he built in the 1950s and 1960s. While most were in the suburbs, the 1962-built Diamond Heights Eichlers are in the city of San Francisco's Visitacion Valley neighborhood. The Garden Route Co. remodeled the landscape of a two-story Diamond Heights Eichler with a steep hillside garden. The challenge: creating flat, usable outdoor living spaces by building terraces and stairs that connect the different levels. With an emphasis on texture, plants with bold forms, and colors, the garden softens the angular landscape architecture and gives the backyard a modern update.

If you make the perfect plant selection for your container garden, no summer will see you shedding tears over a poor selection of plants. Instead, great growers like these Mini Cascade ivy geraniums will take the South’s harsh summer heat and just keep on blooming. Geraniums work wonders as part of a hanging container garden, blossoming to a rich, full, and verdant cascade of flowers spilling over and out of their planters. You’ll be excited by the rush of color, but even more thrilled with how simple these Cascading Geraniums are to maintain.
I live in Northern New Jersey and here is my issue….My lawn tends to get CRABGRASS come summer time. I would like to put down pre-emergent fertilizer/crabgrass preventer right now in the early Spring. I also have patches in my lawn that requires seeding. The issue is that all fertilizers/weed preventers read on the bag “do not seed for at least 8 weeks from fertilizing” My question is, should I seed now (early April) or put down the fertilizer and deal with the bare spots???
Im a student at Reading Memorial High School and I am taking an Entrepreneurship class. For our final project we have to interview an owner of a company and get know how they keep there comapany succesful. I was hoping I could ask you questions about you and your company. It would be greatly appreciated if you respond within the next for days. Thank you for your time
Sometimes design is actually all about the form rather than the function—like when plants with distinctive visual features create amazing sights in a gorgeous garden setting. For such an approach to work, you’ll have to pay special attention to how the forms work together. For this design, textural plants construct a beautiful sense of high drama. This homeowner helped to create this sensation by adding spiky and vertical plants, such as ornamental grasses and caladiums, to her pots. Against the vast, multileveled, linear expanse of her back garden, with its beautiful pool, she created a sense of lightness and height simply by using plants that were always reaching towards the sky. Let your container gardens aim high!
Using sturdy materials like 2 x 4’s and hardware cloth, you can fashion trellises for all of your climbing and vining edibles. Not only will doing this make the plants easier to harvest, but it also allows more room in the ground for vegetables and herbs that tend to bush or clump. Small pumpkins, summer squash, cucumbers, peas, and green beans will love scrambling up the trellis, and they’ll be easier to maintain and harvest when their long vines are elevated.
If you ask anyone what the easiest way to transform the look of your home landscape is, they’ll definitely tell you: blooms. Blossoming flowers, shrubs, and trees make an incredible impact across a yard, and you can add color in just one lasting step. For major impact, we recommend Chinese snowball, which we think is one of spring's showiest shrubs. White flower clusters—that grow 6 to 8 inches across—festoon its branches in late spring. It’s a thrill to behold. The plant gets big; we’ve seen them grow from 12 to 20 feet tall and wide. And by the way, though it looks like a hydrangea, it's actually a viburnum.
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