Beautiful and inspiring pictures, great principles, it gave me what I needed for my project. For people new to the details involved in plants, there's not a lot of information in this book, but that's not what it set out to achieve. It's a great 'one of many' you should have in your collection if directing your landscaping, or wanting to be part of the decision-making process.

Beautiful and inspiring pictures, great principles, it gave me what I needed for my project. For people new to the details involved in plants, there's not a lot of information in this book, but that's not what it set out to achieve. It's a great 'one of many' you should have in your collection if directing your landscaping, or wanting to be part of the decision-making process.


Plant trees for a good cause, and you can quickly transform your yard into a shaded paradise. By joining the Arbor Day Foundation for just $10 – or more, if you’re able – you will automatically qualify for 10 free trees. You can pick any trees you want for your yard, including oaks, flowering trees, and other beautiful varieties that are hand-selected for your region.

You’ve seen those tomato planters on TV that grow tomatoes upside down, but for a few dollars you can get into vertical gardening by making your own. Start with a new, clean 5-gallon bucket and, using a utility knife, cut a circle out of the bottom that’s just large enough to feed a small determinate tomato plant through. Add a few smaller holes for drainage, then fill the bucket with potting soil and hang it wherever there’s sun.
While many of you know something about gardening, the subject of lawn care may be another thing altogether. Let us help with that. Our lawn care section can help answer questions about various types of grass and how to grow them, common lawn issues, alternative solutions and general lawn care. Don’t let questions become a burden to your piece of mind. Instead, get the answers and use the lawn care tips and information provided as a guide to growing a healthy, lush carpet of grass that will make others green with envy.
A tip for lawn care experts: If you have a good feel for how often your lawn needs watering and it is almost that time and there is a rain shower - maybe a quarter of an inch - that is the BEST time to water your lawn and give it that other 3/4 of an inch. Remember, the grass roots are down deep and most weed roots are near the surface. The idea is to keep the top three inches of soil as dry as you can for as long as you can. That quarter of an inch might make it so that your top three inches is well watered but the lower 9 to 20 inches is on the edge of being pretty dry. This gives the weeds some advantage over your grass!

Landscaping and gardening are also ideal outlets for your creativity. Nature gives you an expansive palette of colors, textures, scents, and structural compositions to choose from. In a home garden, you can take these gifts from nature and combine them in any style you desire. But with so many landscaping options at your disposal, where do you begin?
Transforming yards into imaginative outdoor living spaces is what Backyard Designs, Inc. does. We approach each project on an individual basis, using space, sound and color to capture the essence of your home. We use Pool Studio 3D design software to create your ideas for your backyard. This helps you envision exactly what your dreams will look like in your very own backyard.
Im a student at Reading Memorial High School and I am taking an Entrepreneurship class. For our final project we have to interview an owner of a company and get know how they keep there comapany succesful. I was hoping I could ask you questions about you and your company. It would be greatly appreciated if you respond within the next for days. Thank you for your time
Your garden is a palette for your creativity, and garden design is your paintbrush. One of the best ways to create a beautiful composition is to hang your baskets in unexpected places. This container is a medley of plants that grow in various shapes and to various heights, creating their own unique array of delights. A hook installed in a tree branch holds this basket featuring a sensational combination of plants that will work wonderfully in the shade. You’ll love the way many of them spill over the basket and drape in the wind.

Purple fountain grass looks great in containers. Its vertical shape creates an exclamation point in the border. Then, its purplish-red leaves and fall plumes combine well with the red coleus below. This grass and the coleus are not winter hardy in most areas, but new plants bought in spring are inexpensive and grow quickly, so you can enjoy this pairing from early spring until late in the fall. You’ll have its beautiful memories to get you through any harsh winters, and the anticipation of it growing again will have you excited to be back in your garden at the first opportunity in the spring.

Dog poop and dog pee are both high in nitrogen. But if you give your lawn too much nitrogen, you'll kill it. Not the whole lawn. Just the spot with too much nitrogen. Usually there will be a load of dog poop and the grass under it will be dead. And the grass immediately around it will be greener, taller, thicker and healthier than all the rest of the lawn. So the stuff immediately under the crap is "too much" and the stuff surrounding the crap is "optimal". Same thing for pee only there won't be a pile of poop in the middle.
Bigger is not always better, and a judicious use of these tiny succulents is a case in point why. Rather than overwhelm small spaces with large plantings, here is a great lesson in how to use containers to fill bare spots in your garden. This concrete planter, tucked into a planting of dianthus, is filled with tiny textured succulents, pulling you in for a closer look. This creates a contemplative moment of intimacy and pause, a time for simple reflection, and a sense of communion with these delicate plants. These tiny plants are like a whisper in the garden, quietly asserting what it is they have to say.
Yes, you read that right. This does say collard greens, and they really are one of our picks for a fantastic container garden. Easy and versatile, collards have graced Southern gardens and tables for generations. A cousin to kale and cabbage, these nutritious, leafy greens thrive in the cooler weather of fall and early spring. Durable, versatile, and beautiful, they are also incredibly enticing visually, and imbued with a range of tonal variation. They work well in differently sized containers. This galvanized-metal tub is filled with collards, creating an intimate container garden. Use them in situations where you would like simplicity to come to the fore.

Sometimes your container garden can focus as much on its structures as it does on its plants and flowers. With creative thinking, large pots can be repurposed around your yard. This unused pot fountain was repurposed as an accent table and stand for a cheerful container planting. In a similar vein, low columns can also form pedestals for containers. Look in antique stores, salvage yards, and related locations for unexpected finds that can ground your garden with creativity and history. Then, think outside the container and create new pieces that are uniquely yours.
If you are aware of the type of grass you have in your yard and are content with its health and the way it looks, simply learn more about how to treat it well. If you are starting fresh, make sure you select a grass that thrives in your geographic area. One good tip is to locate the best-looking lawn in your neighborhood and initiate a conversation with the owner. They can give you a good idea of what types of seed, fertilizer and watering schedules might also work well in your yard.
A tip for lawn care experts: If you have a good feel for how often your lawn needs watering and it is almost that time and there is a rain shower - maybe a quarter of an inch - that is the BEST time to water your lawn and give it that other 3/4 of an inch. Remember, the grass roots are down deep and most weed roots are near the surface. The idea is to keep the top three inches of soil as dry as you can for as long as you can. That quarter of an inch might make it so that your top three inches is well watered but the lower 9 to 20 inches is on the edge of being pretty dry. This gives the weeds some advantage over your grass!
Make easy hanging wall planters by using wooden pallets. Since wooden pallets are typically already sectioned out, you can easily just hang a half of a wooden pallet up on a brick or sturdy wall to create your own hanging green house! You can put all sorts of tiny plants or herbs into the boxes and create a live growing space you and your friends will surely enjoy. If you’d rather use the wooden pallet for something other than a growing spot, like maybe a garden shelf, you can just as easily do that too!
Second of all, some community colleges have excellent horticulture programs (some don’t, so investigate) and have students with a gift for design. Many times, they will design a yard for free to fulfill a class project or to add to their portfolio. Just call the instructor. They will know the best students and I haven’t met a hort teacher yet that didn’t like to talk about their program.

You don’t have to have an actual farmhouse to create that farmhouse, rustic feel. Bring that farmhouse feel to your space by utilizing some crowd-inducing furniture such as this really great large table. Imagine your next gathering with friends surrounding the space and enjoying each other’s company in an intimate setting such as this one? It’s easy to recreate and even easier to customize to fit your space, décor and style. Cheers to good friends and good times.

Developer Joseph Eichler's name has become associated with the Midcentury Modern California housing tracts that he built in the 1950s and 1960s. While most were in the suburbs, the 1962-built Diamond Heights Eichlers are in the city of San Francisco's Visitacion Valley neighborhood. The Garden Route Co. remodeled the landscape of a two-story Diamond Heights Eichler with a steep hillside garden. The challenge: creating flat, usable outdoor living spaces by building terraces and stairs that connect the different levels. With an emphasis on texture, plants with bold forms, and colors, the garden softens the angular landscape architecture and gives the backyard a modern update.
Sometimes repetition can be a better approach than difference. Finding a simple planting scheme, then sticking with it until you’ve found the perfect amount of containers to make it beautiful, can lead to simply incredible results. So don’t think that your container garden has to be filled with every type of plant imaginable. Instead, repeat your favorite plants in containers and flowerbeds. You’ll appreciate the simplicity of these simple containers set against the natural stone stairs. Pots of bright purple and yellow violas climb the front steps, seeming to spill over and out into the flowerbeds creating a lush, fluid, yet consistent look.
Using a variety of shades of green is a wonderful landscaping idea and a way to add depth to your plantings. Bright chartreuse greens (as seen in these 'Frisia' honey locust trees) catch the eye and stand out in the landscape, especially compared to the darker, richer tones often found in evergreens. Blue-greens add a softness and almost always harmonize well with other shades of the color.
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