You should feel encouraged to do the smaller landscaping projects around your home. If you mess something up, just pull it out of the ground and try again. The larger projects that require a little more knowledge and skill are probably best left to the pros, but what you can do is watch them do the project and learn first hand exactly what goes into building a koi pond or a brick paver patio. As you dig around more in your yard and figure some things out, sometime later you will know exactly how to go about the larger projects, and will have a good time planning and completing them.


Consult an Expert Even if you're convinced that you have what it takes for do-it-yourself landscaping, it may be worthwhile to budget a small fee to have a landscape professional help evaluate your ideas and come up with a concrete plan. "People have a fear of getting ripped off," Miller says. "But a designer can sit down with you and help you think about activities and goals and pull together a realistic budget. It's a shame when folks do a small area and later think, 'Oops, I put that in the wrong place.' They really need to think through all the pieces they might want, even if they won't put it in for years." Get tips to work with landscape professionals.
Have some broken down furniture you don’t know what to do with? Use them in the garden to create a rustic landscape! You already have the stuff – so you might as well put them to good use. Anything from broken wooden benches, stools or wagon wheels (like the ones depicted) can easily create some character in any sort of garden setting. I can imagine a steer or longhorn skull somewhere in this scene – so if you by chance have one lying around, that could also be used! Don’t go and kill a steer, though. That would defeat the purpose of “refurbishing!”

Sodding: If there is no grass in your yard, then sodding is something any homeowner can handle. Do a good deal of stretching first, both upper and lower body, because this is grueling work, and you will be sore after. Read up on how much water is needed once the sod has been rolled out and how to maintain it after. The trick is to find someone who has the yard you want and ask them what they did to get it.

Assuming you are in the right zone for this type of planting, if you don't want to spend all of your time watering, stick with easy-care options in some of your containers. Succulents and bougainvilleas need little care in containers. You can choose succulents that will grow to create senses of scale and drama, such as agave, or aloe. Depending on your choice of succulent, some of these may grow as tall as ten feet high, so be are of their potential when planning your container garden. Then, prepare for a beautiful sight.
When creating areas of defined space in your landscape, it’s important to establish and maintain borders. This is key because edging can draw the eye to different areas, keep things looking tidy and organized, and allow you to add some style with your materials of choice. Be sure to check out the Southern Living Plant Collection for border planting ideas.

Planting in layers is an integral part of putting together this stunning container. Though the handmade bowl that makes up the centerpiece of this gorgeous arrangement may look delicate, it’s made of concrete and recycled materials. Its wide shape accommodates many of the same flowers and plants used in the other two 'Romantic Containers,' just in a more whimsical container display that looks like a flourishing flower arrangement. If you select flowers like dianthus, you will certainly be starting this Romantic Tabletop Container with the right colors, tones, and shapes. Its impact will be elegant, and entirely beautiful. Settle in at the table for an evening drink, or a casual conversation, and let the romance blossom.
Once a boring courtyard, this renovation in Naples, Florida became an outdoor space that reflects the color of flair of its location. Designed by Malibu West Interiors, the patio is surfaced in a non-skid textured porcelain tile. The pool coping was custom-cast in concrete to mimic the shape of the swimming pool. A colorful wall piece was made of teak with pops of glass tile.
Our eyes are attracted to color and many gardeners stop there. But it's easier than you think to add a layer of interest to your garden by incorporating texture. This landscaping idea features tidy mounds of blue fescue, punctuated by an upright pyramid of Colorado blue spruce and dwarf black pine. A potted variegated yucca repeats the texture of the grass and adds in a new color.
×