Gardeners tend to have lots of landscaping ideas for plants and fewer for their hardscapes (nonplant materials). You can easily add a level of interest to your yard by incorporating a variety of materials. Here, the natural feel of lawn and cut flagstones makes for a delightful contrast against smooth Mexican beach pebbles and gravel. Note how the color of the flagstone mimics that of the beach pebbles and ties the two together; it's an example of using repetition.
By carefully sculpting the landscape and choosing the right plants and materials, you can hide an unattractive driveway. With only a few steps, that less-than-picture perfect portion of your home can be transformed into a gardener’s paradise. Start by creating a slightly raised island of lawn in the center of the drive. Then, add a low boxwood hedge toward the back of the island with roses, annuals, and perennials rising above the hedge in the front. Blend a variety of colors, textures, and heights for a great look. Try 'Crystal Fairy' rose for height, lamb's ears for texture, and 'Butterfly Deep Rose' pentas for color.

Your garden is a palette for your creativity, and garden design is your paintbrush. One of the best ways to create a beautiful composition is to hang your baskets in unexpected places. This container is a medley of plants that grow in various shapes and to various heights, creating their own unique array of delights. A hook installed in a tree branch holds this basket featuring a sensational combination of plants that will work wonderfully in the shade. You’ll love the way many of them spill over the basket and drape in the wind.

These professionals have seen all the problems that can occur and know not only how to fix them but how to prevent them from happening altogether. This fact is not to discourage you from trying your own hand at certain projects, but more to acquaint you with the real difference between DIY projects and professional projects. If you can live with mistakes, then charge ahead. Plus, with landscaping, much like a bad haircut, it will soon grow out.


Building large retaining walls is not considered a DIY project. If you need a tall wall, chances are you have an erosion problem just waiting to happen and need to call on a professional. By contrast, though, simple terracing jobs are excellent DIY landscaping projects for beginners. After building small stone retaining walls, you can plant behind them, as you would for a raised bed.
Building large retaining walls is not considered a DIY project. If you need a tall wall, chances are you have an erosion problem just waiting to happen and need to call on a professional. By contrast, though, simple terracing jobs are excellent DIY landscaping projects for beginners. After building small stone retaining walls, you can plant behind them, as you would for a raised bed.
If the soil is mainly clay, apply 1 to 1 1/2 inches of water to moisten the root zone to a 6-inch depth. A sandy soil can be moistened to 6 inches by as little as 1/2 inch. It is important to know not only how deep the turf roots grow, but also how deep your irrigation water penetrates. Watering too deeply, especially on sandy soils, wastes water and allows it to percolate past the root zone.

Flagstone skirting a simple columnar fountain gives the impression of a path winding through a canyon. Yellow- and blue-flowering plants, such as agastache, butterfly bush, and Spanish broom, provide plenty of color near the entry and along the driveway and attract desired winged guests. The fountain in the center provides butterflies with a necessary supply of water.
This ingenious organic look comes from contrasting the strong, stark lines of a modern container with the soft, ripple-in-the breeze movement of natural plants. A carefully curated selection of beautiful containers embody the warm, rich metal tones in this well-designed outdoor oasis. The handsome planter on the mantel has a slate-like finish and blends various succulents with the pink plumes of 'Joey' ptilotus, a bottlebrush plant that is native to Australia. Large-leaved kalanchoes and dwarf golden arborvitaes form the base of this masterpiece, which can grace this mantel just as easily as it could highlight the center of a backyard dining table.
From the first ideas to the final plantings, planning is key. That's why you must break out the gridded graph paper and sketch a detailed plan for how you want your landscape to look. Having a map of your intended designs notated with plantings and plots will help you first imagine what should go where and then bring your vision to fruition. (It’s also a handy guide to keep nearby when you’re elbow deep in hostas and can’t remember how many rows you meant to plant.)
BLACK MEDIC is a sign of low nitrogen soil. Refer to fertilizing above. The above methods will keep black medic in check. You will occassionally see a little once in a while, but it is kinda pretty when it isn't taking over your lawn. This stuff is sometimes called "yellow clover". When it's taking over, it will choke out grass and make flat mats about a foot in diameter. I found a litte in my current lawn and it was a single tiny strand with little yellow flowers.
We saved thousands going this same route where we hired a landscape architect to create a design. Ours was more like $700 for a 1/4 acre with a lot if detail. We have installed the plan ourselves. The front yard alone would have cost at least $6000 but we were able to create beds, borders, and put in the plantings for only $800 and this took three days of work. So happy we went this route.

You can shape any size backyard and give it a natural, earthy look with treated pine sleepers. Treated pine sleepers are resistant to decay, fungi and termites, making them one of the most versatile, easy-to-use and hard-wearing landscaping materials on the market. They can be used to build a retaining wall, a raised vegie garden, flowerbed or as a border along your garden beds.

If the view from your backyard faces an ugly shed or garage, think about incorporating it into your garden design. On this narrow lot, the only view was of the homeowner's ugly garage. But with a can of paint and an inexpensive French door, they turned an ugly duckling into a swan. In fact, they were so happy with the transformation, they added a Mediterranean style patio right up against the new garage doors.


Sometimes repetition can be a better approach than difference. Finding a simple planting scheme, then sticking with it until you’ve found the perfect amount of containers to make it beautiful, can lead to simply incredible results. So don’t think that your container garden has to be filled with every type of plant imaginable. Instead, repeat your favorite plants in containers and flowerbeds. You’ll appreciate the simplicity of these simple containers set against the natural stone stairs. Pots of bright purple and yellow violas climb the front steps, seeming to spill over and out into the flowerbeds creating a lush, fluid, yet consistent look.
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If you are aware of the type of grass you have in your yard and are content with its health and the way it looks, simply learn more about how to treat it well. If you are starting fresh, make sure you select a grass that thrives in your geographic area. One good tip is to locate the best-looking lawn in your neighborhood and initiate a conversation with the owner. They can give you a good idea of what types of seed, fertilizer and watering schedules might also work well in your yard.

HDX Weed and Grass Killer Ready-to-Use kills unwanted HDX Weed and Grass Killer Ready-to-Use kills unwanted plants by inhibiting the production of a substance found only in plants. It enters through the sprayed foliage and moves down to the roots. Avoid direct spray or drift onto desirable plants lawn grasses shrubs and trees. Protect desirable plants and vegetation ...  More + Product Details Close


I once moved to a house that was infested with both bindweed and thistle. Imagine my yard as a big rectangle. I started pulling weeds on the left and stopped about ten percent of the way across. A few days later, I started at the left again and picked out anything that cropped up in the last few days and then made a little progresss into the rest of the rectangle. Each brief weeding trip gets me another 5% of new territory. The important thing is to always weed the area you already weeded first. If I didn't do it this way, then the weed would recover in the first section while I was attacking another section.
"In a nutshell, what is the best way to go about beautifying my yard?" I am sometimes asked this rather broad question, and it's a tough one to answer. There are so many variables in do-it-yourself landscaping, such as budget, skills, the climate of your region, your personal design tastes, how you'll be using your yard, etc. But there are certain steps you can take that are so sound that they readily suggest themselves as answers to this question.
Consider for a moment that if you have a lot of mushrooms in your lawn, this is most likely a sign that you have really excellent soil! Further, the mushrooms you see are the fruiting bodies of a much bigger fungus organism under the soil. Most fungus organisms help your grass be healthier - so I'm usually glad to see a few mushrooms in my lawn now and then. The mushrooms are usually gone as soon as things dry out a bit.
Drainage problems can be a real drain on your time and energy. Solving drainage problems sounds easy, in theory: Find out where the excess water is coming from, then take the necessary steps to channel it away. Sometimes it's not easy and you will need to call a pro, but there are some DIY options, like installing French drains, building dry creek beds and ensuring the proper slope for the runoff. 
One way to create a sense of space in a small garden is to put some curves into your garden paths. A slightly meandering walkway is always better than a straight path because it will give visitors the sense that they are traveling through a large landscape. Just be sure to make your path wide enough for two people to walk side by side comfortably. This curved concrete path is especially appealing because a ribbon of tile separates each slab of concrete.

Like patios and walkways, these "hardscape" elements bring structure to your landscaping. Traditionally made of wood, decks, fences and arbors are now sometimes composed of other materials. Composite wood is an option to consider for decking and deck railings, while vinyl fences and arbors have become very common. It's also important to consider the landscaping that will surround a fence or deck.
Very informative article I’m sure that many do-it-yourselfers have gained alot of knowledge from visiting your site. I like that you’ve mentioned about the soil testing that you can have done or do yourself, I’ve found that to be extremely helpful with my lawn care clients that I service. AffordaLawn is the name of my Lawn Service, we service customers in both Missouri and Kansas and doing a soil test along with the first service for new clients have made us alot of happy customers later in the year. Many tell us they’ve never seen their lawns look so good. Kinda makes it easy though when you know what their lawns in need of.

As you saw earlier, a small lawn can be helpful to a small-space garden because it opens up the area and makes it feel less claustrophobic. Well, if you’re not going to be walking on the lawn all the time, you might consider substituting a groundcover. You not only avoid mowing, you also integrate the area into the landscape. With a groundcover, your lawn becomes the garden.


I have never had to personally deal with grubs. And I have yet to encounter an organic grower that has had to deal with them. But I have had many people write to me and ask how to deal with grubs organically. Nearly all of them have mentioned "Last year I sprayed toxic goo to get rid of the grubs and now they're back". While I did not see what happened, my guess is that birds and other natural grub control ate the dead grubs and died. No more natural grub control.
Thatch is a tight, brown, spongy, organic layer of both living and dead grass roots and stems that accumulates above the soil surface. The interactions among environmental conditions, soil conditions and management practices (irrigation, mowing, fertilization) influence the rate and extent of thatch accumulation. Thatch tends to be a problem on Kentucky bluegrass, bentgrass and fine fescue lawns. It is rarely a problem with tall fescue, wheatgrass, bromegrass or buffalograss. Grass clippings do not contribute to thatch accumulation and should be returned to the lawn during mowing to recycle the nutrients they contain.

If you are aware of the type of grass you have in your yard and are content with its health and the way it looks, simply learn more about how to treat it well. If you are starting fresh, make sure you select a grass that thrives in your geographic area. One good tip is to locate the best-looking lawn in your neighborhood and initiate a conversation with the owner. They can give you a good idea of what types of seed, fertilizer and watering schedules might also work well in your yard.


My soil was only half an inch deep. Even weeds had a tough time growing. Below my half inch of soil was huge river rocks seperated by smaller rocks, sperated by sand. It bore no resemblance to soil. I added four inches of topsoil. This was done with two dumptruck loads at $100 a pop. It covered all of the weeds with enough soil that they could not work through - I could start from scratch with my grass seed of choice!
A superior backyard makes for superior living, period. It is a reminder that you needn’t invest large sums of money and time to fly to the far ends of the earth for a little R&R, but need only step outside. The best backyards combine all the simplicity of time-honored joys with the eye-appeal of modern design. No more mismatched lawn chairs and unsightly patches of neglected turf; it’s time to take your backyard to the next level. And with warmer seasons just a month away, now is your moment to seize these cool backyard ideas and unique possibilities.
As much as we love pansies and violas, they’re vertically challenged. This means that if you want to give them a sense of height or elevation you will have to do this yourself with your choice of container or through the design of your container garden. Give them a lift by perching pots on benches and tables or placing them on your steps. Then leave your pansies and violas to do their true duty, which is to be beautiful and brighten their space through bold color and soft blossoms. Grouping them will create even more interest, so don’t let a single container be left on its own. Go big, go bold, and go colorful.

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What's right for your backyard is highly dependent on your climate. For the best low-maintenance planting results, look for native plants that thrive in your region. Not only are these plants typically easier to establish, but they also require far less water and overall maintenance to grow. As an added plus, your native plant garden will help support biodiversity by providing food and shelter to local fauna.
HDX Weed and Grass Killer Ready-to-Use kills unwanted HDX Weed and Grass Killer Ready-to-Use kills unwanted plants by inhibiting the production of a substance found only in plants. It enters through the sprayed foliage and moves down to the roots. Avoid direct spray or drift onto desirable plants lawn grasses shrubs and trees. Protect desirable plants and vegetation ...  More + Product Details Close

A terrace like this grass terrace depicted is super great if you have a strange pool side are you’d like to fill. There are plenty of cheap pool landscaping ideas out there, but this one is extra interesting because it adds so much texture to the scene. You don’t have to just use different kinds of shrubs or grass in a terrace like this. You could easily make it a tropical paradise with gorgeous flowers, interesting lawn statues and tropical plants. The sky’s the limit with a stacked terrace like this!
As any seasoned landscaper or gardener can tell you, a home’s landscape is more than just a few haphazardly placed trees and shrubs. It requires careful thought, planning, and research – not to mention hard work. Not only can well-designed landscaping increase the pleasure you derive from your dwelling, it can boost curb appeal if you need to sell your home.
Add vibrant color to your yard without sweating in the garden. "I like to always have color, so I try to have plants that flower all season," says Chris. "When something's always blooming in the yard, there's a sense of added life." Black-eyed Susans are a good summer choice because they bloom throughout the season. In the autumn, consider Montauk daisies.
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