Having fresh herbs at home can be much simpler than making a trip to the store. Transplants of cilantro, parsley, and chives are at their best in late winter months, both in containers and in the ground. Plant them in a shallow box, as pictured, and use them as an outdoor centerpiece. They will grow wonderfully well together, and you’ll have as much or as little as you need on-hand for topping a wide range of delectable dishes fresh from oven to table. Label your herbs to be sure which is which, then grab a handful whenever you need one. These raised-bed container gardens should produce plenty to share with family, friends, and neighbors.
Our commitment is to each client we serve, and we are dedicated to providing them with the best products and services available. At Loyalty Lawn Care, we offer personalized service that many other lawn care providers do not deliver. If you are interested in lawn service in St. Charles or St. Louis, MO, we advise you to browse through the different sections of our site to see what we offer. If there is a specific problem with your landscaping or lawn, please visit our "Identify Your Problem" section to develop a better understanding of the situation.
While many of you know something about gardening, the subject of lawn care may be another thing altogether. Let us help with that. Our lawn care section can help answer questions about various types of grass and how to grow them, common lawn issues, alternative solutions and general lawn care. Don’t let questions become a burden to your piece of mind. Instead, get the answers and use the lawn care tips and information provided as a guide to growing a healthy, lush carpet of grass that will make others green with envy.
Purple fountain grass looks great in containers. Its vertical shape creates an exclamation point in the border. Then, its purplish-red leaves and fall plumes combine well with the red coleus below. This grass and the coleus are not winter hardy in most areas, but new plants bought in spring are inexpensive and grow quickly, so you can enjoy this pairing from early spring until late in the fall. You’ll have its beautiful memories to get you through any harsh winters, and the anticipation of it growing again will have you excited to be back in your garden at the first opportunity in the spring.
When you call Lawn Care Plus, you're calling people who care and who will treat your property with respect and integrity. We’re the most trusted name in lawn care, so you can count on us! We make reliability a priority, and that’s why we will always return your calls promptly and be there when you’re expecting us. Our equipment is constantly updated and state-of-the-art, and our knowledge and expertise extend to using the best products for your yard and the environment.
The owners of this home in Potrero Hill near San Francisco asked Seed Studio to redesign their backyard so that it could feel intimate for two, yet accommodate large gatherings. Along with an outdoor living room that offers views of nearby Bernal Hill, the space includes a seat-height deck that surrounds a Corten steel wood-burning fire pit. Plants that work with the rocky soil include succulents, bamboo, and even a vegetable garden.
I am trying to discourage cats from leaving “gifts” on my front lawn. Coffee grounds seemed to work, but I need more grounds that we generate daily. I got too aggressive and tried straight vinegar which worked great to discourage the cats, but has killed the beautiful green that we had growing. It has interesting designs where I have used the vinegar. How do I get rid of both the designs and the cat visits?
The above lawn care advice will eliminate 95% to 99% of your weed problem. But there are some weeds that are almost impossible to get rid of, no matter what. Some of these are even resistant to the chemical army. The two to be careful of in my area are BINDWEED (looks like white or pink morning glory) and CANADIAN THISTLE. These two have HUGE root systems that might go as deep as thirty feet into the soil. They spread with rhizomes, just like your grass. The above techniques will discourage them enough to go to your neigbor's instead. They don't like tall grass or mowing. They might try to pop up on fences or other lawn borders. Fifty outcroppings could all be part of the same plant, so you really have to get as much of them as you can. The key is to remove the green plant that provides it with sugar. It needs sun and sugar to support that massive root system. Repeated digging will weaken it to the point that bugs and bacteria can take over.
This romantic container garden captures the feelings of magic and mystery through its bright colors and beautiful sense of movement. To achieve these effects, you’ll want to try varying the scale of flowers and greenery to produce the wildly untamed, 'growing in a garden' feel that keeps this basket relaxed. Beginning by selecting this sphagnum moss-lined metal hanging basket, larger dianthus then blend with smaller petunias, while variegated English ivy and tiny baby’s tears dangle over the sides. The effect is the sense of beauty in bloom, bursting forth in wonder from this colorful basket.
HDX Weed and Grass Killer Ready-to-Use kills unwanted HDX Weed and Grass Killer Ready-to-Use kills unwanted plants by inhibiting the production of a substance found only in plants. It enters through the sprayed foliage and moves down to the roots. Avoid direct spray or drift onto desirable plants lawn grasses shrubs and trees. Protect desirable plants and vegetation ...  More + Product Details Close
It's easy to create a hodgepodge look when planting if you try to plant one of everything. Avoid that with this gardening idea: Reusing the same colors, shapes, or plant varieties in plantings. Here's a perfect example: To the left of the deck, golden creeping Jenny (Lysimachia nummularia 'Aurea') echoes the color of golden sweet flag (Acorus gramineus 'Ogon'). The sweet flag augments the texture of the blue fescue (Festuca 'Elijah Blue'), which plays off the silvery-blue color of a potted false cypress (Chamaecyparis pisifera 'Baby Blue'). The shape of the false cypress, in turn, is a repeat of the Japanese maple next to the deck.
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