Mary McCoy, LMSW is a licensed social worker who works closely with individuals, families, and organizations in crisis. She knows first-hand how financial choices can prevent and mitigate crises, and she's therefore passionate about equipping people with the information they need to make solid financial decisions for themselves and their loved ones. When Mary isn't on her soap box, you can find her hiking, jogging, yoga-ing, or frolicking with her family.
It is both beautiful and simple to use impatiens to accent porches and entryways, and as filler flowers, they subtly enhance any garden container. Here, a skirt of coral impatiens surrounds a dwarf Alberta spruce. The dwarf spruce is also well suited for container gardening— ‘Tiny Tower’, for example, grows to a full height of between only 4-6 feet tall. These beautiful, small trees also have soft, bright green needles when they are young, and color to a gorgeous silver-green as they mature. You may need to gently prune this spruce into shape, which will help to promote slow growth and a full, dense form. You’ll love the results.

Every digital document Ernie and Erica currently sell: Rocket Mass Heater plans: four different types of rocket mass heater design plans, Double-Chamber Earthen Oven plans, The Art of Fire ebook, Simple Shelter pdf, and a sneak peek at selections from our upcoming Builder's Guide: -Rocket Mass Heater Builder's Guide (RMHBuilderGuide), Chapter 4 (Operations and Maintenance).
You’ve seen those tomato planters on TV that grow tomatoes upside down, but for a few dollars you can get into vertical gardening by making your own. Start with a new, clean 5-gallon bucket and, using a utility knife, cut a circle out of the bottom that’s just large enough to feed a small determinate tomato plant through. Add a few smaller holes for drainage, then fill the bucket with potting soil and hang it wherever there’s sun.
The most important key to this rustic aesthetic is being sure not to overplant the container. You are sure to love the look of this arrangement when you give the flowers space to breathe. This weathered, rusty metal bucket—another incredible flea market find—is studded with periwinkles, the profusely blooming Rieger begonias, coleus, and other annuals. But what it is not is overcrowded, which could keep the plants from getting adequate light. For even more rustic, Southern-inspired charm, try suspending this arrangement on a branch. This will add to the casual, easy-does-it feeling.
Small or expansive, a backyard is nothing short of paradise at your backdoor. From savvy English gardens to on-trend West Coast style spreads, there is truly no limit to the possibilities that await you. A backyard can be transformed into a Zen retreat, complete with rock gardens, manicured foliage, and even a koi pond, or a chic spa escape with meditative fountains and streamlined chaise lounges; the choice–and pleasure–is yours.

If you're not ready to nix grass completely, consider which grasses naturally grow in your region. "If you plant a grass that is accustomed to your climate, that makes it low maintenance," says Chris. "You can research which grass grows best in your area, and in turn save money on watering, fertilizing, and other maintenance." For instance: In the Northeast — where the couple lives in their Cape Cod home — fescue and ryegrass grow well. Alternatively, in the Southeast, Bermuda grass is a better option.
If you're not ready to nix grass completely, consider which grasses naturally grow in your region. "If you plant a grass that is accustomed to your climate, that makes it low maintenance," says Chris. "You can research which grass grows best in your area, and in turn save money on watering, fertilizing, and other maintenance." For instance: In the Northeast — where the couple lives in their Cape Cod home — fescue and ryegrass grow well. Alternatively, in the Southeast, Bermuda grass is a better option.
Establish a solid base for stone surfaces to avoid fix-ups later. If you are planning a stone patio, lay a six- to eight-inch layer of compacted pea stones first. "It will prevent weeds and keep your patio level," says Chris. "If you have a good base, it ends up being low-maintenance for decades to come. You won't have to be weeding things, pulling up stones, and re-leveling them."
With the challenge of working around one of the largest oak trees in the appropriately named city of Oakville in Ontario, Canada, Partridge Fine Landscapes added curbed braces and sculpted ends to an organically shaped patio. The flagstone patio was set on a concrete base, with pavers individually cut to accommodate the curves. The pergola is made of Douglas fir. Lime-green hydrangeas soften the landscape.
Container gardens are perfect ways to highlight the elegance of simplicity. This succulent garden is a perfect example of having individual plantings in single containers, allowing each to reflect its unique leaf shape and form complemented by the architecture of the container. Using various decorative ground covers jazzes up your potted plantings—these are enhanced with beautiful selections of natural stone. The highlight of this design is a potted blue agave surrounded by pebbles serves as a living sculpture on this deck. The smooth stones inside the container reflect the larger stones around its base, creating a synthesis of inside and out.
Unlimited Lawn Care is a locally owned and operated lawn care company, providing a wide assortment of lawn service options designed to maximize your enjoyment of your outdoor environment. In addition to our standard year-round lawn care program, we also are proud to provide services such as pest control for fire ants, fleas, ticks, and other harmful lawn insects. We also provide lawn aeration and over-seeding for fescue lawns, core aeration for Bermuda and zoysia lawns, and even moisture management and other soil services to ensure your lawn’s growing environment is optimized.
You can contain a garden that’s simple and beautiful with a raised planter on wheels. It’s ideal for gardening in small spaces or if you have limited mobility. This raised planter is ergonomically designed and convenient to reach from all sides. It creates a waist-high garden that eliminates bending. Plus, the height prevents weed seeds from blowing in and helps keep critters out. If you’re worried about the planter moving, don’t be. The 2 non-wheeled legs are firm to the ground so it will remain stationary. The raised planter will make a great addition to your apartment’s balcony.

You don't need a huge backyard to have a water garden. In fact, installing a water garden is a great way to handle low or wet spots in your garden. Just dig out the area, add a pond liner and pump, and you're on your way. Even a tiny oasis will attract a wide range of colorful butterflies and birds. In this garden, Water Snowflake, Nymphoides humboldtiana, a small relative of water lily, provides color in tight quarters.
From the first ideas to the final plantings, planning is key. That's why you must break out the gridded graph paper and sketch a detailed plan for how you want your landscape to look. Having a map of your intended designs notated with plantings and plots will help you first imagine what should go where and then bring your vision to fruition. (It’s also a handy guide to keep nearby when you’re elbow deep in hostas and can’t remember how many rows you meant to plant.)
You can contain a garden that’s simple and beautiful with a raised planter on wheels. It’s ideal for gardening in small spaces or if you have limited mobility. This raised planter is ergonomically designed and convenient to reach from all sides. It creates a waist-high garden that eliminates bending. Plus, the height prevents weed seeds from blowing in and helps keep critters out. If you’re worried about the planter moving, don’t be. The 2 non-wheeled legs are firm to the ground so it will remain stationary. The raised planter will make a great addition to your apartment’s balcony.
If you are thinking about doing this lawn care thing as a bidness, then I would like to point you toward my buddy Patrick's lawn care business stuff. He has been helping folks make a go at lawn care income for damn near ten years. He provides all sorts of bean counting, newsletters, advertising and ... the center showpiece, lawn care software. As an added bonus, for every 100 people that click on this stuff, Patrick has agreed to give me pie. You want me to have to have pie don't you?
Although it is sometimes confused with the completed unrelated plant the Bougainvillea, mandevilla is a beautiful, bright flowering and climbing vine found throughout the South. Mandevillas can thrive in containers—as with the one pictured, which twines its way through the railing on a rooftop deck. Reveling in hot weather given its tropical origins, mandevilla can grow more than 10 feet a year, and will bloom continuously from spring until the first frost. And, although in the tropical and coastal South they may weather the winter outdoors, if you plant them in containers you may even bring them inside for the cold season.

Add this idea to your cheap garden landscaping ideas bank! Not only are stepping stone paths adorable, but they can actually prove to be quite useful. Stepping stones really don’t cost much at all to buy, but if you have stones on hand, you can easily create your own stepping path. Creating these types of paths look great in any garden setting, even in front yards. You don’t necessarily have to have a garden in order to create a great stepping stone path, but if you do incorporate them into an already existing garden, you can easily create interesting shapes, sizes and styles.
Flowers always make a home seem more welcoming. Adorn your entrance with assorted annuals and perennials to keep your home awash with color all year long. Petunia, Snapdragon, Lily-of-the-Nile, and 'Gertrude Jekyll' roses are great additions to your entry mise-en-scene. Also, if you have only a small space between your house and the street, try constructing a low fence out in front of the yard. This little trick gives the illusion that your house is farther from the street than it really is, and it also makes a great space for planting flowers and vines. Perhaps there’s something to that “white picket fence” idea after all.
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