A planter in a faux-lead finish is a timeless choice, but the cylindrical shape of these tall fiberclay urns gives them a distinctly modern and clean, geometric feel. This type of styling can work well in any décor because it focuses on familiar forms. Choosing a neutral tone or texture for your container helps bring out the unique natural beauty from the color of the flowers and foliage pop. Here, string of pearls creates plenty of architectural drama through their unique shape, while purple calibrachoa and blue ageratum add just the right dose of brightness to add depth to this subtle arrangement.


Bucks County, Pennsylvania landscape architects Dear Garden Associates were tasked with retrofitting existing farm buildings on a property with a new house and lots of land. Slopes that back up to the farmhouse were modified to accommodate terraces, gardens, and paths that link different components of the property. The hardscaping was softened by plants chosen for their flowers and foliage. Among the selections: Purple Smokebush, Mellow Yellow Spiraea, Russian Sage, and Smooth Viburnum.
This pink ‘Dragon Wing’ begonia—a hybrid—is the perfect plant for a hanging outdoor container because it will grow to be about one to one-and-a-half feet tall and ten to twelve inches wide. Begonias will grow particularly well in containers in general. The ‘Dragon Wing’ begonia drips with flowers throughout the summer and into fall. For an even more exciting container, combine it with ‘Silver Falls’ dichondra for a splash of color against shimmering foliage. You will marvel at the dichondra’s heart-shaped leaves, and its silver-toned leaves will glisten.
If you’re trying to control where your dog – er – does his business, a pathway is the best way to make sure your dog’s most private moments are kept out of the way of foot traffic. Pathways will also help to ensure your dog doesn’t trample your precious flowers while looking for a place to play. Loop pathways around the flower beds so they don’t receive any canine traffic, and build a designated pathway and “bathroom area” so that it’s clear to your dog where he or she needs to go.
I can understand hiring professional help when something is not your area of expertise, but to “take advantage” of undocumented workers because they’re willing to work for pennies on the dollar is unethical at best. I’m disgusted by the idea that an American man’s day job is more exhausting or grueling than that of an undocumented worker’s. Myself and my husband work in jobs that are high-stress and require long hours, yet we still manage to do our own landscaping, home remodeling, cleaning and cooking. Not only does doing it ourselves save money, the sense of accomplishment and pride in the work we’ve done with our own hands is absolutely priceless.
You should feel encouraged to do the smaller landscaping projects around your home. If you mess something up, just pull it out of the ground and try again. The larger projects that require a little more knowledge and skill are probably best left to the pros, but what you can do is watch them do the project and learn first hand exactly what goes into building a koi pond or a brick paver patio. As you dig around more in your yard and figure some things out, sometime later you will know exactly how to go about the larger projects, and will have a good time planning and completing them.
Animal feed is often sold in very large, colorful plastic bags* that could almost double as works of art. Make a unique vertical planter by poking drainage holes in the bottom, cutting handles into the top for hanging, then adding potting soil and plants. It’s recycling at its best! (* If plastic begins to flake off over time, replace or keep away from water sources.) Photo courtesy of Chris McLaughlin.
As they say, things that look like they are alike always reveal their little differences, and things that seem at first like they may be different often turn out to be quite alike. If you adopt this approach to your container gardening, you’ll find that grouping flowers by form or by color becomes a great way to rethink your approach to planting if you have a tendency to keep your flowers all the same. Instead of only one flower, use several flowers of the same color for a greater impact in a small planting. Tall yellow daffodils, medium-size pansies, and small violas are a happy mix in this terra-cotta planter.
Many landscaping plans and plant options available for backyard gardening is head-spinning! Professional landscape designers agree that the best way to start designing your dream garden is to first determine the size and shape of your new space. Begin by browsing online photo galleries, diy magazines and even your own neighborhood for beautiful flower bed designs. Current 2017 trends in easy garden planting ideas show designs with exotic tonal color combinations that have similar rather than contrasting shades. After determining your layout, head to your online plant nursery or home improvement center with a list of region appropriate plants to ensure that your new garden beds will thrive.
Along with landscape architect Victoria Pakshong of [place], (fer) studio designed a landscape plan for the now-larger property's natural upslope. A railroad-tie path traverses the entire width of the estate, while the driveway—or elongated entry experience—is made of concrete pavers and permeable Grasscrete. The pool and outdoor activity zones are built with an emphasis on the horizontal lines of the property and maintain a low profile so that nothing obstructs that fabulous view.
Take glorious fall color right up to your door by mixing the blazing tones of orange and yellow with cool shades of purple and blue. First, encircle a copper container with a bittersweet wreath (fresh or faux). To contrast with the orange berries, add ‘Lemon Ball’ sedum and the regal hues of purple cabbage. Spice up the center with ‘Calypso Orange’ ornamental peppers and ‘Cosmic Yellow’ cosmos. Crown the look with a halo of Mexican bush sage. Stack pumpkins on the steps for additional color. Provide full sun and moderate water and the display will flourish through the fall. When it's done, just plant the sedum in your yard to continue the show.
A water feature—even a small, self-contained unit that stands alone on a patio—should look like it belongs in its surroundings. You can use natural stone to build it up, or you can use the same stone or material that you find on the house. Do not to use too many materials or the effort may backfire. A good rule is to use no more than three elements in one area, or the area can get too busy.

Add vibrant color to your yard without sweating in the garden. "I like to always have color, so I try to have plants that flower all season," says Chris. "When something's always blooming in the yard, there's a sense of added life." Black-eyed Susans are a good summer choice because they bloom throughout the season. In the autumn, consider Montauk daisies.
On the other hand, an easy-maintenance ground cover is a great and cost-effective alternative to grass. Thyme, bishop’s weed, and lamium spread quickly over room-sized sections of a front and back lawn, and remain hearty through temperature and drought swings. Simply plant around 10 creeping ground cover plants (more if you want faster coverage or you’re dealing with an area larger than a bedroom) for between $5 and $10 each. They should quickly germinate and take over portions of your yard with beautiful leaves and flowers.
Before planting a lawn, decide on the desired quality, how the lawn will be used, and how much time and money you are willing to invest. Have your soil tested. Contact your Colorado State University Extension county office for information on soil testing. Soil amendments can easily be added before planting. High quality sod or seed also helps ensure a satisfactory lawn.

Having fresh herbs at home can be much simpler than making a trip to the store. Transplants of cilantro, parsley, and chives are at their best in late winter months, both in containers and in the ground. Plant them in a shallow box, as pictured, and use them as an outdoor centerpiece. They will grow wonderfully well together, and you’ll have as much or as little as you need on-hand for topping a wide range of delectable dishes fresh from oven to table. Label your herbs to be sure which is which, then grab a handful whenever you need one. These raised-bed container gardens should produce plenty to share with family, friends, and neighbors.
Consider a Hybrid Approach It's a newer approach but one that Miller finds more and more landscape designers and homeowners using: a combination of professional installation and do-it-yourself landscaping. "Most homeowners either can conquer much more or much less than they think they can," Miller says. "They'll begin a project and get overwhelmed. So you really need to think if you want to spend your next ten weekends breaking your back, or have someone help you."
Combine several English ivy topiaries and a clipped lemon cypress to accent a garden table. You’ll be able to sit down, yet feel as if you are strolling through a classic parterre garden. Mix spirals, globes, columns, and lollipop shapes of varying heights—you’ll love how simple it is to help these topiaries maintain their beautiful shapes. Unify the look by planting everything in terra-cotta pots. We love the flared sides of these clean and simple pots by Campo de' Fiori (campodefiori.com). The topiaries are by Schubert Nursery (schubertnursery.com), and should be readily available at your local garden center.
This deck-top container garden is a study in variation in similarity, proving just how beautiful the simple repetition of a shape or color can be in creating a relaxing outdoor space. Here, three ceramic containers in a subtle shade of turquoise hold a variety of beautiful plants. In the largest pot, working from back to front and tallest to shortest, densely plant 'Liberty Classic Yellow' snapdragon, 'Bouquet Rose Magic' dianthus, and 'Tickled Pink' veronica. Place 'New Look' dusty miller and 'Lemon Ball' sedum in the front to trail over the edge. Pack a powerful, single-note punch in the two smaller pots by planting 'Supertunia Vista Bubblegum' petunia in the midsize container and more sedum in the smallest.

These amazing large wood slices take the place of your customary stepping stones or stone garden embellishments. These are a funky way to make your garden the focal piece of your backyard. Whether you have a pond area or even just a wide space you need to add some interesting pieces to, using natural elements like wood and stone are great ways to incorporate more nature into the scene. Get as artsy as you please with a conception like this. Add lawn statues or even some gazing balls for added color and texture.
Flagstone skirting a simple columnar fountain gives the impression of a path winding through a canyon. Yellow- and blue-flowering plants, such as agastache, butterfly bush, and Spanish broom, provide plenty of color near the entry and along the driveway and attract desired winged guests. The fountain in the center provides butterflies with a necessary supply of water.

The most cost effective way to fill flowerbeds with great looking plants is to buy perennials that you can divide. This may sound like advanced level gardening but really it isn't. It will work with clump forming perennials such as geums, astrantia and hardy geraniums. Simply tip the plant out of its pot and pull it apart into two or three bits, each with some stalks and root. Dig a hole and plant each part in your flowerbed. Next year when they've grown and spread, you can dig them up and pull them apart again to gain even more plants. You'll get a wonderful display in a couple of years for very little cash. Six geranium plants are usually enough to get going in an average sized garden.
Certain ornamental grasses, like maiden grass, are resistant to dog traffic without having sharp blades that will cut or otherwise injure your pup. This greenery holds its shape throughout the year, and will give your dog plenty of space to play. That being said, what’s more important than planting dog-resistant plants is planting species that are not harmful to dogs. Some flowers, like azaleas and daffodils, can be toxic to dogs and should not be planted in a place where they might accidentally be ingested.
Make your outdoor space your dining room by adding some great chairs and a table. Who says picnics are meant for summer? With an outdoor dining area, every meal could be eaten outside! Even if you have a smaller patio area, you could easily incorporate a pretty great dining set which could be made absolutely adorable by way of table settings, funky plants and even some hanging string lights. Add some comfy outdoor pillows for the chairs and you’ve got a ready-made party place just for you and your friends!
Using evergreen plants in a container means that you will always have a base that will look good for years. Once this element of your container is established, you can fill in with beautiful plants that may need more attention, but that will be easy. Choose something like a cast-iron plant, and then add in some caladiums, some impatiens, and even a creeping fig. This will give you the classics to thrill, fill, and spill. Any shade-loving combination that works well in a container can add color to an entry. If you need more structure, or balance, simply create an additional container of the same size and materials, or do a smaller one as a complement.
You don’t have to get out the clippers, although should the mood strike, you can train and topiary these boxwoods into any shape that you like. Potted boxwoods offer the beauty of formal elegance with the simplicity of little maintenance. In general, boxwoods can be drought tolerant, and you won’t have to fertilize them too often. This large American variety creates a living wall in a line of concrete planters—a process helped by planting the boxwoods in identical planters at the same time. Use a few simple tips and tricks to make your boxwood container garden easy to maintain, but even easier and more beautiful to behold.
You don’t want a one-dimensional home, so why would you want one-dimensional landscape design? Add lovely, eye-catching layers to your yard with elevated planters and hanging baskets. This strategy creates visual interest with minimal effort. Adding elevated planters and hanging baskets also creates a sea of beautiful color from high to low, and the visual effect gives the impression of waves of blossoms rising and falling all across your yard. If you want to create an immersive escape, this is a foolproof way to get started. As an added bonus, plants love the good drainage and aeration that raised planters provide.
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