Sprinkle a little sawdust on the spot and give the spot a little attention from your hose. The sawdust will hide the poop and it will counter the excess nitrogen. Combining with the nitrogen, it will, in time, turn into compost - enriching the soil. The sawdust will also reduce any odor by about 95%. The water will wet the sawdust and dilute the nitrogen source a bit, thus helping the beginning of the composting process.
Get out the wire patterns and get ready to make some amazing shapes because once you have boxwood in your container garden you will want to give them their own unique identities. Boxwood’s willingness to be clipped, shaped, and trained makes it the perfect candidate for a classic topiary. There are guides for learning tips and tricks to achieve the perfect topiary design. We’ve got images of the amazing topiary skills of Pearl Fryar—and you may one day wish to emulate his creative skills—so get clipping, and with skill and patience you’ll soon have your boxwood topiaries in tip-top shape.

But we don’t stop there. As one of the area’s premier lawn care companies, we can also provide extended services to care for your whole landscape. For instance, our crew of yard service professionals can keep your landscape looking immaculate with our mowing, edging, trimming, and related services. Our tree and shrub care experts can keep your ornamental foliage looking beautiful and healthy. We even have a landscape design/build team, including licensed landscape architects, which can work with you from start to finish to create a beautiful outdoor retreat, complete with elements such as terraced gardens, comfortable sitting areas, a charming stone pathway, or any other idea you can envision.

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You’ve seen those tomato planters on TV that grow tomatoes upside down, but for a few dollars you can get into vertical gardening by making your own. Start with a new, clean 5-gallon bucket and, using a utility knife, cut a circle out of the bottom that’s just large enough to feed a small determinate tomato plant through. Add a few smaller holes for drainage, then fill the bucket with potting soil and hang it wherever there’s sun.

Caladiums are one of the most popular plants in the South for creating beauty in difficult-to-grow-in shady places. Caladiums—a tropical plant native to America—have incredibly colored foliage that can have blotches of red, rose, pink, white, and more. Some of our favorite caladiums include ‘Pink Symphony,’ ‘Iceberg,’ ‘Miss Muffet,’ and ‘Candyland.’ To bring this beautiful plant into your landscaping plan easily, integrate planters into your hardscape. This poolside scene includes a trough-like container built right into the bank. Fill it with a colorful array of caladiums and you will have created your own personal poolside tropical oasis.

My brother does all my landscaping because he enjoys it. I am lucky if I get to weed the flag flower bed. He doesn’t trust me cause he knows what he has planted. LOL. We get our mulch free from the city. It is pretty good and we have never had a problem with it especially after all the storms we have had lately. You have to load it yourself and unload it yourself but it is worth it to us. I get a lot of free plants, gravel, stones, and even mulch on freecycle. My best freecycle find for the yard was a 1920’s concrete fountain as tall as me (in four parts). It is awesome. I also got several bags of those white landscaping pebbles. I had to rebag them cause the bags were in bad shape from sitting outside for years but the rocks were fine. Working in the yard is always fun and very rewarding. I would never pay anybody to work in my yard. I did the work myself when I bought my house. I reclaimed the back pasture with a lawnmower and a limb cutter. It was hard work but I did a little every night after work and it finally got done, even cleaned out the creek so it runs again now. My brother researches everything on the internet since he is disabled and can’t talk to strangers.
Bigger is not always better, and a judicious use of these tiny succulents is a case in point why. Rather than overwhelm small spaces with large plantings, here is a great lesson in how to use containers to fill bare spots in your garden. This concrete planter, tucked into a planting of dianthus, is filled with tiny textured succulents, pulling you in for a closer look. This creates a contemplative moment of intimacy and pause, a time for simple reflection, and a sense of communion with these delicate plants. These tiny plants are like a whisper in the garden, quietly asserting what it is they have to say.
As mentioned previously, using natural elements such as wood and stone are great ways to make an outdoor space feel more close to nature. Since you’d be utilizing elements you’d typically find in nature anyways, these are usually cheaper items you can easily incorporate to any outdoor area. These wooden stumps in the picture make great outdoor patio tables or even side tables, depending on your preference. You could easily find stumps like these in wooded areas or in neighborhoods with a lot of trees if you don’t have them on hand already.
Fences are great for keeping your backyard a private space and away from the eyes of your neighbors. If you have a dog, a fence is a must-have item to keep your dog contained and safe. Choose a fencing style or material that matches your landscaping style, like a rustic post and wire style or a picket fence. Make sure it’s sturdy and has narrow slats so that your dog cant’ get stuck between rails.
Caladiums are one of the most popular plants in the South for creating beauty in difficult-to-grow-in shady places. Caladiums—a tropical plant native to America—have incredibly colored foliage that can have blotches of red, rose, pink, white, and more. Some of our favorite caladiums include ‘Pink Symphony,’ ‘Iceberg,’ ‘Miss Muffet,’ and ‘Candyland.’ To bring this beautiful plant into your landscaping plan easily, integrate planters into your hardscape. This poolside scene includes a trough-like container built right into the bank. Fill it with a colorful array of caladiums and you will have created your own personal poolside tropical oasis.
Creating furniture out of old wooden pallets has to be one of the easiest, most creative and affordable things you can do! Not only does this type of furniture look great, it creates a sort of rustic landscape that can easily be dressed up or down. You can stain or paint your pallet furniture to match whatever theme or setting you’ve incorporated into the setting. Add some fun patio cushions and you’ve got an amazing outdoor area that will look fantastic all year long!
Flowers always make a home seem more welcoming. Adorn your entrance with assorted annuals and perennials to keep your home awash with color all year long. Petunia, Snapdragon, Lily-of-the-Nile, and 'Gertrude Jekyll' roses are great additions to your entry mise-en-scene. Also, if you have only a small space between your house and the street, try constructing a low fence out in front of the yard. This little trick gives the illusion that your house is farther from the street than it really is, and it also makes a great space for planting flowers and vines. Perhaps there’s something to that “white picket fence” idea after all.
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