Drainage problems can be a real drain on your time and energy. Solving drainage problems sounds easy, in theory: Find out where the excess water is coming from, then take the necessary steps to channel it away. Sometimes it's not easy and you will need to call a pro, but there are some DIY options, like installing French drains, building dry creek beds and ensuring the proper slope for the runoff. 

Using a variety of shades of green is a wonderful landscaping idea and a way to add depth to your plantings. Bright chartreuse greens (as seen in these 'Frisia' honey locust trees) catch the eye and stand out in the landscape, especially compared to the darker, richer tones often found in evergreens. Blue-greens add a softness and almost always harmonize well with other shades of the color.


Hanging baskets follow the same recipe as containers as far as plant care goes. But instead of an upright thriller plant, you want more spillers and fillers—an upright thriller obviously won’t work as well. Calibrachoa in red, purple, and yellow can fill out fast with blooms that look like miniature petunias, so it makes a container overflow with interest quickly. It also covers the container, making the flowers, rather than the container itself, the center of attention. Consider planting calibrachoas by color, or mix them together, depending on your design plan and personal preference. Either way, your hanging baskets with be eye-grabbers.
There are three classes of caladiums—fancy leaf, strap leaf, and dwarf—and all three will work in containers. Once they are established, and their basic needs for water and fertilizer are met, they should thrive. The colorful foliage of caladiums has tons of drama. Pots containing three different caladiums add color and variety to this entry in summer. From left to right: ‘June Bride,’ ‘Pink Gem,’ and ‘Aaron’. You can probably find a wide range of caladiums at your local garden center, but if you need to find a wider selection than what may be locally available, caladiums are also available online. 
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One of the challenges with container gardening can be retaining visual beauty through changing seasons. This thoughtful approach puts that problem to rest. The solution is to think of every container as having a 'keeper'—a durable plant that continues from season to season—with a plant that may require more attention. For this beautiful pair of urns we’ve partnered colorful annuals with an evergreen for an established planting that can still change from season to season. With ivy spilling over the sides, and 'Pandora’s Box' violas providing bold tones, these planters are pure excitement. In general, violas are more tolerant of temperature variation than the botanically similar pansies.
If you have container gardens, chances are they're on your porch, entryway, deck, patio, or balcony. Too few gardeners consider the gardening idea of mixing containers into their beds and borders. Doing so is an easy way to add flexibility to the landscape. Large, colorful glazed or plastic containers are a great landscape idea to add a bright splash, even without blooms. You can move them around to highlight different parts of your yard, plus it's easy to change out container gardens each season to get a different look.
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