Replacing lawn with a ground cover of rocks or large boulder accents cuts down on upkeep and the need for irrigation. In addition to adding a rugged look to your backyard, sand- or stone-based ground cover can double as a weed suppressor and foundation for stepping stones. Moreover, choose low-maintenance plants, like sedum or succulents, to plant in the rock garden for beautiful contrast.


You don’t need to hire an architect or professional landscaper to get some interesting layout designs. With a little research and the help from photos like this one, you can easily see some ideas and recreate them to fit your own specifications. Cut out shapes in planters and sidewalk areas can offer an interesting yard focal point or even add to an already existing design. Use your imagination and cut shapes out to fit into your lawn via garden beds or even gravel and rocks.
Another thing about lawn care watering: I have discovered that if you are going to water an inch, it is better to water half an inch, wait 90 minutes and then water another half an inch. Maybe do this once a month. Sometimes when the soil gets really dry, it will repel water. This is called "superdeflocculation" (I think Mary Poppins would be impressed with this word!). If you put a little water in first, wait, and then put more, the soil is better prepared to take in more water.

Build a border: Landscape timbers, railroad ties and short retaining walls for flower beds or raised bed gardening are easy do it yourself landscaping projects that have long-lasting impact. Draw up a simple landscape design plan for the area you plan to border and make a list of materials you’ll need – the border itself, fill dirt/topsoil, plant life and tools. Building borders make take a little elbow grease, but your creation will be worth years of enjoyment!
One of the challenges with container gardening can be retaining visual beauty through changing seasons. This thoughtful approach puts that problem to rest. The solution is to think of every container as having a 'keeper'—a durable plant that continues from season to season—with a plant that may require more attention. For this beautiful pair of urns we’ve partnered colorful annuals with an evergreen for an established planting that can still change from season to season. With ivy spilling over the sides, and 'Pandora’s Box' violas providing bold tones, these planters are pure excitement. In general, violas are more tolerant of temperature variation than the botanically similar pansies.
It's easy to create a hodgepodge look when planting if you try to plant one of everything. Avoid that with this gardening idea: Reusing the same colors, shapes, or plant varieties in plantings. Here's a perfect example: To the left of the deck, golden creeping Jenny (Lysimachia nummularia 'Aurea') echoes the color of golden sweet flag (Acorus gramineus 'Ogon'). The sweet flag augments the texture of the blue fescue (Festuca 'Elijah Blue'), which plays off the silvery-blue color of a potted false cypress (Chamaecyparis pisifera 'Baby Blue'). The shape of the false cypress, in turn, is a repeat of the Japanese maple next to the deck.
×