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As any seasoned landscaper or gardener can tell you, a home’s landscape is more than just a few haphazardly placed trees and shrubs. It requires careful thought, planning, and research – not to mention hard work. Not only can well-designed landscaping increase the pleasure you derive from your dwelling, it can boost curb appeal if you need to sell your home.
With the challenge of working around one of the largest oak trees in the appropriately named city of Oakville in Ontario, Canada, Partridge Fine Landscapes added curbed braces and sculpted ends to an organically shaped patio. The flagstone patio was set on a concrete base, with pavers individually cut to accommodate the curves. The pergola is made of Douglas fir. Lime-green hydrangeas soften the landscape.
the bamboo is a clumping variety called Bambusa eutuldoides viridi-vittata , Asian lemon bamboo. This variety is a clumper and you do not need to contain it, however, do allow an 8'by 10' area for its ultimate growth. Bamboo does require constant maintenance and you will need to do some research for the specific variety you choose. Once planted, it will become a beautiful focal point and add a stunning tropical accent. Photo Credit: Sherwood Cox
Sometimes your container garden can focus as much on its structures as it does on its plants and flowers. With creative thinking, large pots can be repurposed around your yard. This unused pot fountain was repurposed as an accent table and stand for a cheerful container planting. In a similar vein, low columns can also form pedestals for containers. Look in antique stores, salvage yards, and related locations for unexpected finds that can ground your garden with creativity and history. Then, think outside the container and create new pieces that are uniquely yours.
Consider for a moment that if you have a lot of mushrooms in your lawn, this is most likely a sign that you have really excellent soil! Further, the mushrooms you see are the fruiting bodies of a much bigger fungus organism under the soil. Most fungus organisms help your grass be healthier - so I'm usually glad to see a few mushrooms in my lawn now and then. The mushrooms are usually gone as soon as things dry out a bit.
One way to create a sense of space in a small garden is to put some curves into your garden paths. A slightly meandering walkway is always better than a straight path because it will give visitors the sense that they are traveling through a large landscape. Just be sure to make your path wide enough for two people to walk side by side comfortably. This curved concrete path is especially appealing because a ribbon of tile separates each slab of concrete.
Red Dragon Rice grows tall, leafy spindles that can add touches of color to a simple container garden setting. Here, a chicken feeder planted with ‘Red Dragon’ rice makes a novel addition to this deck railing. Red dragon rice requires a high degree of moisture, and it does not tolerate cold at all, so consider this plant an annual. And while it is colorful and beautiful, it also should be planted judiciously. Red dragon rice is considered a serious weed in rice-growing areas. However, it is okay to plant it elsewhere.
Just like clothing retailers, nurseries try to push last season’s plants, shrubs, and trees out the door through clearance sales to make room for new merchandise. These price cuts can result in huge savings for consumers who are willing to bide their time. Look for deeply discounted plants at the end of spring and summer. Even if the leaves and flowers look scorched and unkempt, a healthy, green stem means that they are perfectly salvageable as long as you plant them quickly and water them sufficiently.
One of the challenges with container gardening can be retaining visual beauty through changing seasons. This thoughtful approach puts that problem to rest. The solution is to think of every container as having a 'keeper'—a durable plant that continues from season to season—with a plant that may require more attention. For this beautiful pair of urns we’ve partnered colorful annuals with an evergreen for an established planting that can still change from season to season. With ivy spilling over the sides, and 'Pandora’s Box' violas providing bold tones, these planters are pure excitement. In general, violas are more tolerant of temperature variation than the botanically similar pansies.
What’s better than revamping an outdoor area? Revamping it into an incredible, edible landscape! This is one of those great cheap landscape ideas for front of house that will be beneficial for months to come! Seeds really don’t cost that much, and even if you prefer to go with seedlings, you can easily transform your front yard into an edible landscape that you can utilize all year long. Depending on the season, you can plant and harvest your own produce, saving you loads of money at the grocery store in the long run. It’s a great way to make the most of your lawn and help the environment, too.
This deck-top container garden is a study in variation in similarity, proving just how beautiful the simple repetition of a shape or color can be in creating a relaxing outdoor space. Here, three ceramic containers in a subtle shade of turquoise hold a variety of beautiful plants. In the largest pot, working from back to front and tallest to shortest, densely plant 'Liberty Classic Yellow' snapdragon, 'Bouquet Rose Magic' dianthus, and 'Tickled Pink' veronica. Place 'New Look' dusty miller and 'Lemon Ball' sedum in the front to trail over the edge. Pack a powerful, single-note punch in the two smaller pots by planting 'Supertunia Vista Bubblegum' petunia in the midsize container and more sedum in the smallest.
Like patios and walkways, these "hardscape" elements bring structure to your landscaping. Traditionally made of wood, decks, fences and arbors are now sometimes composed of other materials. Composite wood is an option to consider for decking and deck railings, while vinyl fences and arbors have become very common. It's also important to consider the landscaping that will surround a fence or deck.
This entry path feel more like a nature trail than a garden walk. Thyme grows between steps; boulders, cactus, and rosemary fringe the path's edges. Even before guests get to the house, wide steps (made of concrete aggregate) encourage them to slow down and enjoy the garden. If your yard doesn't have enough sun for thyme, tuck Corsican mint or Japanese sweet flag between your steps or pavers; both have scented foliage. Stagger your pavers to slow the journey.
Perennials are an excellent way to “divide and conquer” your landscape. Any time you plant a perennial, you can count on it to grow in size for several years. Instead of buying new flowers each year, simply uproot and move new blooms that germinated from last year’s perennials. You can turn a $10 perennial into $40 worth of savings if you divide its blooms and replant them in four different portions of your garden each year.
Having fresh herbs on hand means that you can always add beautiful tastes to your home-cooked meals. You can make this simple by planting a tiny kitchen garden in a pot. Easy to create, and simple to maintain, you will love the fragrances and flavors that are contained in this one display of coriander, rosemary, and thyme. Coriander—often called cilantro—is beautiful in salads and salsas. You can choose rosemary according to your flavor preferences since there is one that is even known as ‘Chef’s Choice’. Thyme makes a delicate seasoning. Since you’ll have this all at your fingertips, plan your weekly recipes to take advantage of everything these great herbs can bring to your table.
Yes, you read that right. This does say collard greens, and they really are one of our picks for a fantastic container garden. Easy and versatile, collards have graced Southern gardens and tables for generations. A cousin to kale and cabbage, these nutritious, leafy greens thrive in the cooler weather of fall and early spring. Durable, versatile, and beautiful, they are also incredibly enticing visually, and imbued with a range of tonal variation. They work well in differently sized containers. This galvanized-metal tub is filled with collards, creating an intimate container garden. Use them in situations where you would like simplicity to come to the fore.

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Growing herbs on a balcony is an ideal way to enjoy a garden without much time commitment. And, as anyone who has bought herbs at the grocery store lately can attest, knowing how to grow your own herbs can save you a lot of money. It’s actually fairly simple to grow herbs on an apartment balcony, as long as you have the correct combination of sunlight and potting conditions.

Replacing lawn with a ground cover of rocks or large boulder accents cuts down on upkeep and the need for irrigation. In addition to adding a rugged look to your backyard, sand- or stone-based ground cover can double as a weed suppressor and foundation for stepping stones. Moreover, choose low-maintenance plants, like sedum or succulents, to plant in the rock garden for beautiful contrast.
If you travel or aren’t available to water your garden easily, the self-watering square planter is a great solution for you. The double-wall design and sub-irrigation systems (encourages root growth) are functional, and the shape and clean lines are fresh and modern so you can group all of them together to make an interesting collection. The water reservoir holds up to 6-1/2 gallons. Approximately 8-gallon soil capacity holds even larger plants!
Feeling creative? This is an amazing DIY tutorial on how to create a fantastic little hose holder garden box! Not only is it adorable, but you could easily create several of these on the cheap to spruce up a garden area. As far as small backyard landscape ideas on a budget, this is one of the easiest, most affordable ideas out there. You can choose to make larger or smaller boxes depending on the size of the outdoor area. Get the kids involved and make this an easy family fun project!

Planting a conventional turfgrass lawn is not a water-wise solution in the arid West. Nor is paving a big area always practical, since that much hardscape creates a lot of heat and glare, says Nate Downey of Santa Fe Permaculture. But if you lace paving stones with ribbons of native buffalo grass (Buchloe dactyloides), you'll achieve an eye-calming "soft patio" effect, as Downey calls it, that needs much less water than a traditional bluegrass or fescue lawn.
Sometimes, it makes good financial sense to call in a pro in order to avoid costly property damage from falling trees or from drainage or erosion problems. Or issues with a driveway or a new gate. And there are cases where calling in a pro simply allows you to avoid backbreaking work (for example, hiring a stump grinder rather than digging out a stump yourself). But calling in a pro does not mean turning over responsibility—Always do some research first, to be as informed as possible.
Bigger is not always better, and a judicious use of these tiny succulents is a case in point why. Rather than overwhelm small spaces with large plantings, here is a great lesson in how to use containers to fill bare spots in your garden. This concrete planter, tucked into a planting of dianthus, is filled with tiny textured succulents, pulling you in for a closer look. This creates a contemplative moment of intimacy and pause, a time for simple reflection, and a sense of communion with these delicate plants. These tiny plants are like a whisper in the garden, quietly asserting what it is they have to say.

Through the myriad of inexpensive landscape ideas, we found a super cute way to refurbish an old bathtub by turning it into a planter! Not only is this an adorable idea, but really, how great is a bathtub as a planter? Bathtubs are sturdy, spacious and a sure way to keep your plants protected from pests like rabbits or rats. This would be especially cute for a mini vegetable garden. The circle lining in this photo is also great because it features tiny shrubs. A really great concept for turning old furniture or appliances into something new and fabulous!
We’ve just built a small guest house behind our home in Southwest Mississippi. Red clay surrounds the house! I’ve sprinkled rye grass seed and covered it with hay, but I realize (now) that I need some top soil. What should be my next steps? The rest of the yard is covered with a mixture of Bermuda and who-knows-what. It’s pretty patchy too! (I can’t afford to re-sod the whole 2 acres…)
VSI The cobblestone driveway was designed and installed by Neel Reid during the period of his ownership of Mimosa Hall. The 9-acre Mimosa Hall, built circa 1840, is a landmark of neoclassical design with extensive gardens in the vibrant historic district of Roswell, Georgia, 20 miles north of Atlanta. The 6,000-square-foot temple-style home has heart-of-pine floors throughout, a black-and-white marble hall, soaring ceilings, and 10 fireplaces. Famed architect Neel Reid made Mimosa his home in the 1920s, creating a double parlor and designing a long fieldstone driveway and courtyard. The gardens include century-old trees, imposing boxwood hedges, rare specimen trees, stone walls, paths, parterres, a swimming pool, and a 19th Century grist mill refashioned into a barn. In addition, 21 acres of adjoining woods are for sale, one of the few remaining tracts of developable land of its size within walking distance of Roswell’s old town square. 

Choosing and placing plants is half the fun, though during this process, it's easy to become overwhelmed with choice. This step is guaranteed to be so much smoother if you do the research and planning in advance as you sketch your landscape map. (Bonus points for organizing your planting plan with a color-coded key!) If you're not sure where to begin, read through our picks for the 8 Best Plants to Grow and 10 Best Landscaping Ideas.
If you are tempted to let your container garden run just a little wild, then plantings like these may help create that perfect sense of cultured mess that you’re after. Just plan to let your plants spill out of their container. A generous planting of golden variegated sweet flag (Acorus gramineus ‘Ogon’) fills this kettle, with golden creeping Jenny (Lysimachia nummularia ‘Aurea’) trailing out and onto the gravel below. One, contained, lifts the eyes, while the other gently creates a delicate, soft carpet of green that creeps towards a comfortable seating area. This is for when the garden is not totally wild, but it is just wild enough.
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When a customer chooses Loyalty Lawn Care, we can develop a program that incorporates the needs of the turf, plants, landscape, and individual's goals. Whether this includes tree and shrub services or perimeter pest services, we are available to invest the time necessary to care for our customers and their lawns. We work to achieve the highest quality results. We can provide you with a free lawn analysis and continue from there to provide you with the personal care that you deserve. If your property is in need of tree and shrub care, we can give the landscape the professional appearance it needs. We serve customers in St. Louis, St. Charles and West County, Missouri. If you are in need of any form of lawn care for your home or office, contact us today!


Julie Moir Messervy's vision for composing landscape of beauty and meaning is furthering the evolution of landscape design and changing the way people create and enjoy their outdoor surroundings. With over three decades of experience, eight books (incuding Home Outside and Outside the Not So Big House with Sarah Susanka), and numerous high-profile lectures, Messervy is an innovative leader in landscape and garden design theory and practice. Her landscape architecture and design firm, JMMDS, is located in Saxtons River, Vermont.
In the horticultural world "rot" almost always mean "composting". To properly compost, you need a certain mixture of carbon heavy organic matter (wood, dried leaves, straw, etc.) and nitrogen heavy organic matter (manure, grass clippings, table scraps, weeds, etc.). If you get just the right mix, you get hot composting happening. Too much nitrogen and it gets a little stinky. Too much carbon and the composting takes a very long time.
In order to retain the easy upkeep of your garden, you will want to choose low maintenance landscaping plants. These types of plants can grow and prosper with little water and do not require trimming and other care. Some easy large or small yard ideas include planting bushes such as the plumbago ariculata or leocophyllum frutescens. These bushes are water conserving plants that do not require irrigation or frequent watering.

Unlike cut blooms, a living flower arrangement planted in a container will give you color and beauty for months. Combine plants that thrive in the same growing conditions and offer colors and textures that complement each other. These six plants do precisely that: Coleus id perfect for adding color to pots, and loves shade; fan flower, with all its segments on one side, brings a unique shape to any garden container; and Joseph’s Coat, which has been described as having 'wonderfully gaudy foliage,' brings color like bright fire to any arrangement it is a part of. So let these six flowers be like a sextet, and share a harmony. You’ll love the sound of their voices alone and together.
You can follow all the above do-it-yourself landscaping tips and still not be happy with your yard. For, besides giving your yard a pleasing appearance, you must also be sensible in planning for its maintenance. Beautiful or not, you'll resent your yard if it causes you too much work. Unless you don't mind spending hours each weekend on upkeep, plan your design for low maintenance.
Most inexpensive landscape ideas always seem to include little lights – and for a very good reason. You can do so much with outdoor lights these days, and since most of the outdoor lights you find today are LEDs, you can add so much “glow” without putting a huge increase in the electric bill. This is a great way to decorate your front or backyard area and add a level of class and fun. Even better, outdoor lights can remain festive no matter the time of year or approaching season. They just always look great and are party ready for any occasion!
What's right for your backyard is highly dependent on your climate. For the best low-maintenance planting results, look for native plants that thrive in your region. Not only are these plants typically easier to establish, but they also require far less water and overall maintenance to grow. As an added plus, your native plant garden will help support biodiversity by providing food and shelter to local fauna.
If you're anything like us, you know that it's not just the inside that counts—when it comes to houses, that is! Accenting your home with natural elements, from flora and fauna to stonework and water features, makes for an instantly inviting space for guests (and not to mention a restful retreat for you!). Let these outdoor design ideas for shrubbery, walkways, and more inspire you to create your own beautiful backyard garden or front lawn oasis.
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