If you are aware of the type of grass you have in your yard and are content with its health and the way it looks, simply learn more about how to treat it well. If you are starting fresh, make sure you select a grass that thrives in your geographic area. One good tip is to locate the best-looking lawn in your neighborhood and initiate a conversation with the owner. They can give you a good idea of what types of seed, fertilizer and watering schedules might also work well in your yard.
Revamping your landscape can be a daunting proposition, especially when you want to go about it in DIY fashion. There’s one helpful thing to know before you begin, though, and it will make every piece of landscaping work that follows so much easier. The one thing that everyone wishes they knew before tackling a DIY landscape design project is also the one thing you need to remember: Planning makes perfect.

Through the myriad of inexpensive landscape ideas, we found a super cute way to refurbish an old bathtub by turning it into a planter! Not only is this an adorable idea, but really, how great is a bathtub as a planter? Bathtubs are sturdy, spacious and a sure way to keep your plants protected from pests like rabbits or rats. This would be especially cute for a mini vegetable garden. The circle lining in this photo is also great because it features tiny shrubs. A really great concept for turning old furniture or appliances into something new and fabulous!
For big impact, use big pots. They’ll accommodate more and larger plants, and the added soil means they won’t need watering as often. This simple, straightforward, and direct advice is great to remember if you want to create large-scale drama in your container garden. Trailing Algerian Ivy is the perfect choice in this case, with its large, wide leaves. It is also an aggressive grower. The other perfect plant selection here is the Needle Palm, which may well be the hardiest plant in the world—so tough Southern summers won’t prove any challenge for this powerful palm. Add in some colorful annuals, and your perfect containers are full, fun, and fit for anything.
Add this idea to your cheap garden landscaping ideas bank! Not only are stepping stone paths adorable, but they can actually prove to be quite useful. Stepping stones really don’t cost much at all to buy, but if you have stones on hand, you can easily create your own stepping path. Creating these types of paths look great in any garden setting, even in front yards. You don’t necessarily have to have a garden in order to create a great stepping stone path, but if you do incorporate them into an already existing garden, you can easily create interesting shapes, sizes and styles.
To keep your flowers from being gobbled up by deer—one of the most heartbreaking of all garden misfortunes—choose flowers that people find glorious and deer find disgusting. It’s not as hard a chore as you might imagine. We recommend that you choose deer-averse perennials like butterfly weed, globe thistle, 'Royal Red' butterfly bush, or even purple cornflower. Deer won’t touch them, and, at the end of the day, you’ll still have a flowerbed full of gorgeous leaves and blooms. You can find any of these varieties at garden centers, but be sure that you plant them in well-drained soil.
You can grow your very own mini-orchard on the balcony of your apartment. There are a number of fruits that are well-suited to apartment gardening and grow beautifully outdoors in a pot or window box. For most of these, you’ll need a pot that’s at least 30″ in diameter and has holes for drainage. You’ll need at least 1 foot in depth, plus room for good drainage material, like pebbles or stones. And don’t forget something like a pan underneath to catch any water, especially if there’s another balcony below yours. Apartment gardening means being a good neighbor, as well. Here are some fruits that you can grow:

Daffodils are container-friendly options for spring plantings, and they are quite literally they are some of the most-prized bulbs in the South. They naturally increase from year to year, so they can fill a container naturally. They also require minimal care. But most of all, they’re simply gorgeous—they’re available in colors including white, salmon, pink, orange, apricot, and red. Pair them with other spring bloomers with similar condition requirements such as grape hyacinth. The grape hyacinth will grow to between six inches and a foot tall, leaving the daffodils to soar above.


This one is especially fun if you have kids that like to spend time wandering around outdoors with your four-legged friend. Consider using plants and other hardscaping features, like tunnels, balance beams, and pipes, to create a fun obstacle course for your dog. This will help him burn off some of his excess energy, even if you don’t have a ton of backyard space.
This window box design is concerned less with the box as a container, and more with the box as a foundation for an incredible approach to beauty. Layered, loud, and filled with color and excitement, coleus, begonias, and purple fountain grass spill from this spectacular window box, completely hiding the container. The purple fountain grass blooms in summer, and can continue blooming into fall, giving this container wonder from season to season. Coleus comes in every color of the rainbow, and remains bright from spring through fall. This sets up a container full of wonder. Put it together and let its radiance glow.
Thatch is a tight, brown, spongy, organic layer of both living and dead grass roots and stems that accumulates above the soil surface. The interactions among environmental conditions, soil conditions and management practices (irrigation, mowing, fertilization) influence the rate and extent of thatch accumulation. Thatch tends to be a problem on Kentucky bluegrass, bentgrass and fine fescue lawns. It is rarely a problem with tall fescue, wheatgrass, bromegrass or buffalograss. Grass clippings do not contribute to thatch accumulation and should be returned to the lawn during mowing to recycle the nutrients they contain.

In the horticultural world "rot" almost always mean "composting". To properly compost, you need a certain mixture of carbon heavy organic matter (wood, dried leaves, straw, etc.) and nitrogen heavy organic matter (manure, grass clippings, table scraps, weeds, etc.). If you get just the right mix, you get hot composting happening. Too much nitrogen and it gets a little stinky. Too much carbon and the composting takes a very long time.


Mary McCoy, LMSW is a licensed social worker who works closely with individuals, families, and organizations in crisis. She knows first-hand how financial choices can prevent and mitigate crises, and she's therefore passionate about equipping people with the information they need to make solid financial decisions for themselves and their loved ones. When Mary isn't on her soap box, you can find her hiking, jogging, yoga-ing, or frolicking with her family.
The natural hues of the sweet potato vine and pennisetum make the trio of pink geraniums, petunias, and angelonias pop. Petunias look incredible in containers because they come in an amazing array of colors. They’ve also been adapted to grow well in our humid Southern climate, and often bloom continuously from spring until fall. Take advantage of all the eye-stopping excitement that will bring to your front porch. Here we’ve used three different sizes of pressed-metal planters with decorative embossing and a copper-toned finish to hold these incredible container fancies.
BLACK MEDIC is a sign of low nitrogen soil. Refer to fertilizing above. The above methods will keep black medic in check. You will occassionally see a little once in a while, but it is kinda pretty when it isn't taking over your lawn. This stuff is sometimes called "yellow clover". When it's taking over, it will choke out grass and make flat mats about a foot in diameter. I found a litte in my current lawn and it was a single tiny strand with little yellow flowers.
One of the most exciting ways to create a boxwood garden is to make subtle changes to varieties of the same plant. For this design, English boxwoods growing in the ground surround a terra-cotta pot planted with an American boxwood. When planning your boxwood garden, particularly if you plan to use containers, be sure that they will be well drained, and that they can be kept fungus-free. Also, Southern gardeners face specific challenges: Choose boxwoods that are best suited for hot and humid climates; be aware of insects that may wreak havoc on boxwoods; and check your site’s exposure before planting. Follow these simple steps and you will reap the rewards of a beautiful boxwood container garden.
We saved thousands going this same route where we hired a landscape architect to create a design. Ours was more like $700 for a 1/4 acre with a lot if detail. We have installed the plan ourselves. The front yard alone would have cost at least $6000 but we were able to create beds, borders, and put in the plantings for only $800 and this took three days of work. So happy we went this route.

We’ve just built a small guest house behind our home in Southwest Mississippi. Red clay surrounds the house! I’ve sprinkled rye grass seed and covered it with hay, but I realize (now) that I need some top soil. What should be my next steps? The rest of the yard is covered with a mixture of Bermuda and who-knows-what. It’s pretty patchy too! (I can’t afford to re-sod the whole 2 acres…)
This woven wicker basket is a natural way to decorate a bare wall in an outdoor space, and it will look just as beautiful whether you set it against brick, timber, or concrete. Pink zinnias and yellow tuberous begonias are the focal points or 'thrillers'. You’ll love the variation between the tighter, round zinnias and the softer, open petals of the begonias. Blue Cape plumbago and golden lantana add an extra hint of drama—think of these as the 'fillers'. Finally, English ivy, with its delicate, well-known shape, cascades over the side—that is the 'spiller', which gives this beautiful hanging container a sense of movement.
One of the best ways to keep your garden looking fresh is to take advantage of seasonal sales at your local nursery, and to stock up on popular plants. And, since you want them to look beautiful until it is time to make them permanent additions to the landscape, keep them in their nursery pots. Then, display them in galvanized buckets on the porch until you are ready to plant them in your garden. You can easily recreate this look with gerbera daisies, salvias, shasta daisies, daylilies, and sweet potato vines. Look for similar pots at gardening or home-supply stores.
The real difference between a project that you do yourself and one that is professionally done is performance, speed and repair. If you are looking only at how much money you can save, what does that matter if what you’ve done isn’t right? A landscaping project is one place where this thought is made clear. The act of sodding, planting trees, and creating flower beds, among other things, is back breaking, but doable. The knowledge can be learned by reading several books and studying up on different schools of thought, but you don’t need to know codes, understand how to calculate soil compaction, or cubic water pressure.
When creating areas of defined space in your landscape, it’s important to establish and maintain borders. This is key because edging can draw the eye to different areas, keep things looking tidy and organized, and allow you to add some style with your materials of choice. Be sure to check out the Southern Living Plant Collection for border planting ideas.
Hi Cathy! I myself was having same problem as you are. Just bought my home in February and when spring came I noticed my lawn was brown and dead in places but it is improving as green sprouts are coming in. To answer your question have a soil test done. I did and it showed me what my soil lacked and what fertilizer i needed to apply. You can find out your self if your grass is diseased by insects by grabbing your grass near the soil if it pulls out with no problem this is an indication of insect disease to your grass. You can get a soil test kit at lowes or home depot. it will let you know what your soil needs to green up your lawn. Some people just by any fertilizer but you need to be careful if you dont know what your lawn soil is lacking you could burn your lawn with applying the wrong fertilizer.
Lawn Care Plus is always there when we need them. My husband and I love to DIY, but there are some things we can't do alone. Craig and Branden are very knowledgeable about irrigation systems, and they make quick repairs at a reasonable price. The office manager is also very helpful when we call. We would (and do) recommend Lawn Care Plus to our friends!

Choosing and placing plants is half the fun, though during this process, it's easy to become overwhelmed with choice. This step is guaranteed to be so much smoother if you do the research and planning in advance as you sketch your landscape map. (Bonus points for organizing your planting plan with a color-coded key!) If you're not sure where to begin, read through our picks for the 8 Best Plants to Grow and 10 Best Landscaping Ideas.
A lush front lawn is as American as apple pie, but it’s not the most financially savvy choice you can make – particularly if you live in an arid climate or struggle to keep your grass green and weed-free. Many homeowners deal with patchy and weeded lawns simply by re-sodding the yard, but this can cost several thousand dollars. In fact, The National Gardening Association notes that fresh grass sod can cost 15 to 35 cents per square foot, and more than double that amount if professionally installed. Grass also requires a hefty amount of water, and may need fertilizer and weed treatments as well, all of which impact your bottom line.

Along with crevices, most gardens have narrow strips that lack soil and moisture. Rather than fighting the conditions, work with them. One of the landscaping ideas you can implement is to plant some tough, vining groundcovers and let them sprawl over the area. Use ivy in shady areas, succulents in sunny spots. A mulch of gravel is a nice low-maintenance addition that keeps plant foliage clean.

This one is especially fun if you have kids that like to spend time wandering around outdoors with your four-legged friend. Consider using plants and other hardscaping features, like tunnels, balance beams, and pipes, to create a fun obstacle course for your dog. This will help him burn off some of his excess energy, even if you don’t have a ton of backyard space.
Impatiens is one of the best options for flowers that can take heat and humidity, which makes them the perfect choice for container gardens in the South. Although they love the shade, as long as you keep impatiens well watered, they can manage some sun. Some hybrids like ‘New Guinea Hybrid’ will even tolerate bright light. In this design, large, low containers are filled with lush mounds of potted impatiens. Kept pinched back, your impatiens will remain full and bushy, and their blossoms can last until the first frost. Get your container garden going—you know these can’t wait!
When filling a show-stopping window box, don't hesitate to use small evergreen shrubs or perennials, which last throughout the seasons. These work well in window boxes and provide sustained and consistent color. In the fall, turn to mums, kales, pansies, violas, and snapdragons for color, and then add a few daffodil or tulip bulbs for a bold burst of excitement in the spring. Be sure to include something that can spill over the edge of the window box and you’re assured of a sense of movement, and a great deal of excitement. Keep the evergreens trimmed as necessary—you’ll love how restrained they look against the bold splashes of color.
Three years ago, our landscape architect estimated it would cost $25,000 to $30,000 to pay somebody else to implement his plan. By doing most of the work ourselves, we've spent a little over $3,500 on building materials, plants, shrubs, compost, soil, gravel, equipment rental, and the water system.  We haven't tracked our work hours, but our family of four has enjoyed the time outdoors and being together, even if it meant a lot of sweat equity. 

You don’t have to have an actual farmhouse to create that farmhouse, rustic feel. Bring that farmhouse feel to your space by utilizing some crowd-inducing furniture such as this really great large table. Imagine your next gathering with friends surrounding the space and enjoying each other’s company in an intimate setting such as this one? It’s easy to recreate and even easier to customize to fit your space, décor and style. Cheers to good friends and good times.


VSI The cobblestone driveway was designed and installed by Neel Reid during the period of his ownership of Mimosa Hall. The 9-acre Mimosa Hall, built circa 1840, is a landmark of neoclassical design with extensive gardens in the vibrant historic district of Roswell, Georgia, 20 miles north of Atlanta. The 6,000-square-foot temple-style home has heart-of-pine floors throughout, a black-and-white marble hall, soaring ceilings, and 10 fireplaces. Famed architect Neel Reid made Mimosa his home in the 1920s, creating a double parlor and designing a long fieldstone driveway and courtyard. The gardens include century-old trees, imposing boxwood hedges, rare specimen trees, stone walls, paths, parterres, a swimming pool, and a 19th Century grist mill refashioned into a barn. In addition, 21 acres of adjoining woods are for sale, one of the few remaining tracts of developable land of its size within walking distance of Roswell’s old town square. 

There are three classes of caladiums—fancy leaf, strap leaf, and dwarf—and all three will work in containers. Once they are established, and their basic needs for water and fertilizer are met, they should thrive. The colorful foliage of caladiums has tons of drama. Pots containing three different caladiums add color and variety to this entry in summer. From left to right: ‘June Bride,’ ‘Pink Gem,’ and ‘Aaron’. You can probably find a wide range of caladiums at your local garden center, but if you need to find a wider selection than what may be locally available, caladiums are also available online. 
Like patios and walkways, these "hardscape" elements bring structure to your landscaping. Traditionally made of wood, decks, fences and arbors are now sometimes composed of other materials. Composite wood is an option to consider for decking and deck railings, while vinyl fences and arbors have become very common. It's also important to consider the landscaping that will surround a fence or deck.
You won’t have to tiptoe around these fantastic plantings. Instead, you can create beautiful pathways through your container garden with these simple, architectural containers. When planning your flowerbeds, simply buy extra plants for accents. These containers were planted with flowers left over from the borders. Not only do the containers look great, but also they tie back into the colors of the adjacent walk.
Gravel’s earthy texture, its give underfoot, and its crunchy sound are the reasons why this oldest of hardscapes will always be perceived as the softest of paving materials. This gravel entry is a clean casual foil for plant textures and colors. Japanese silver grass billows over the basalt wall at right beside climbing hydrangea. ‘Maori Sunrise’ New Zealand flax in a container punctuates the small pond in the middle while ‘Palace Purple’ heuchera mugho pine and gunnera fill a bed near the house. Cotoneaster spills onto gravel.
The Dogington Post is proud to do for the dog world what other great online newspapers have done for the dog-eat-dog world. We will show you who's bark is worse than their bite, who is most likely to be leader of the pack and who is the next bitch headed for stardom! A parody, but paws a moment. Along with all the fun, you'll find valuable information, heartfelt inspiration and a community captivated by the love of dogs.
Transforming yards into imaginative outdoor living spaces is what Backyard Designs, Inc. does. We approach each project on an individual basis, using space, sound and color to capture the essence of your home. We use Pool Studio 3D design software to create your ideas for your backyard. This helps you envision exactly what your dreams will look like in your very own backyard.
I worry about the fact that you’ve used wood from an old deck in the garden. Wood for decks and play structures until recently was usually pressure-treated with an arsenic solution and is now regarded as toxic. I hope you’ll get the wood tested. It seriously isn’t anything to take lightly. The EPA halted sales of most wood treated this way in 2004, but it had been used for twenty years beforehand. Here’s the EPA website on pressure-treated wood:
Gardeners tend to have lots of landscaping ideas for plants and fewer for their hardscapes (nonplant materials). You can easily add a level of interest to your yard by incorporating a variety of materials. Here, the natural feel of lawn and cut flagstones makes for a delightful contrast against smooth Mexican beach pebbles and gravel. Note how the color of the flagstone mimics that of the beach pebbles and ties the two together; it's an example of using repetition.
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