Wooden pallets can easily be turned into super great compost bins! Instead of trying to create some sort of landscape design or layout, compost bins may be the best use of the land for the garden centric person. Wooden pallets can also be made into garden boxes, so really, having wooden pallets on-hand for any gardener would be the best situation. This just goes to show how versatile wooden pallets are and how handy they are when it comes to gardening.

Gardening season is upon us. Gardening is relaxing, gets you in touch with nature and is a way to make your living space more beautiful. Don’t miss out this perfect time for planting vegetables, herbs, flowers and other more plants. Making a perfect garden is something that takes knowledge and a degree of experience to achieve, so how do you get it? Right now we have compiled tons of tips and ideas that will solve common issues faced by gardeners, whether you are brand new to gardening or you have a veteran green thumb.
This container is as sensual as it is beautiful, creating a multisensory sensation. It combines a burst of daffodils with bold hues and fragrant seasonal blooms for colorful containers that keep on giving. This trio combines floriferous 'Superbells Dreamsicle' calibrachoa, the delicately fragrant and easy-to-grow 'Snow Princess' sweet alyssum, and cool-weather 'Sunsatia Lemon' nemesia. Tonally, these bolt towards the warm end of the color spectrum, and are rich with deep oranges and yellows, tempered by touches of white throughout. Even separately, every one of these would be a visual delight. Together, the interplay of each with the other is intoxicating.
The historical term for a classically designed French garden is a 'parterre garden.' Some of its most famous examples are actually in England, including the fabulous—and recently recreated—geometric garden at Hanbury Hall. This container garden, with its formal structure and arrangement, takes both its inspiration and its design from the parterre garden design concept—but the container gardening part of the process is still incredibly simple. Regardless of your overall garden design plan, you can add some height to the center of any flowerbed by placing a very vertical potted plant in its middle. Here, a potted rosemary topiary rises above the other edibles in this bed. What is so sensational about this approach is that it uses a traditional language, but with new, timesaving gardening innovations.

In an organic yard, Fernando takes a decaying blade of grass down in his burrow and munches on it "These things are my favorite!" says Fernando. "I need some more!" Back at the surface, Fernando finds some home made compost "What is this? Oh my! This is my new favorite! (munch munch) It's so good! (munch munch) How can this be crunchy and chewy AT THE SAME TIME! Oof, I'm so full. I wanna have sex and have lots of babies so they can enjoy the crunchy chewy stuff."
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Sodding: If there is no grass in your yard, then sodding is something any homeowner can handle. Do a good deal of stretching first, both upper and lower body, because this is grueling work, and you will be sore after. Read up on how much water is needed once the sod has been rolled out and how to maintain it after. The trick is to find someone who has the yard you want and ask them what they did to get it.
Succulents equal low-maintenance. For this simple-means-surprising container a vintage sorghum pot is filled with cold-hardy succulents that bloom in the fall. They are paired with flowers that attract masses of bees and need also need little water. What this means is that you’re helping the natural ecosystem while putting few additional strains on its resources—by encouraging bees you’ll be helping nature’s pollinators, but the choice of plants with few water requirements you may also allow nature to meet their needs. That’s smart container gardening. Since the container itself—a vintage sorghum pot—is also repurposed, this is a wonderful way to approach your rustic backyard back yard container garden.
In days past, the best way to find a lawn care professional to service your lawn was to pull out the yellow pages and look up someone in your area or simply just choose a lawn service company that sounded good. LawnStarter has simplified the process and made it better. The process is now completely automated through our website from arranging for someone to come out and mow your yard to paying for the service. We also have friendly customer service experts on-hand to help you with every step of the process. With Lawnstarter, you can rest assured that you're only getting the top-rated lawn service professionals. We bring you the top-rated lawn care services in your area.
A "how to" film on raising chickens with nature from hatching to the plate! A cinematic quality production that is highly entertaining and informative! It's all you need to know for raising your own chickens. From hatching your chicks to feeding your chickens, to building your chicken housing to butchering your chickens to putting them to work in your garden, to cooking chicken and eggs.
Perennials are an excellent way to “divide and conquer” your landscape. Any time you plant a perennial, you can count on it to grow in size for several years. Instead of buying new flowers each year, simply uproot and move new blooms that germinated from last year’s perennials. You can turn a $10 perennial into $40 worth of savings if you divide its blooms and replant them in four different portions of your garden each year.
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A backyard landscaping design is more informal than its front-yard counterpart, where elaborate walkways are common. But regardless of whether it's to wend your way between flower beds or vegetable gardens, or to traverse your green grass, you'll probably want to have some sort of informal path cutting through the area. A path of garden stepping stones may be just the right solution.
Purple fountain grass looks great in containers. Its vertical shape creates an exclamation point in the border. Then, its purplish-red leaves and fall plumes combine well with the red coleus below. This grass and the coleus are not winter hardy in most areas, but new plants bought in spring are inexpensive and grow quickly, so you can enjoy this pairing from early spring until late in the fall. You’ll have its beautiful memories to get you through any harsh winters, and the anticipation of it growing again will have you excited to be back in your garden at the first opportunity in the spring.
Don’t confuse Plectranthus, or ‘Mona Lavender,’ for the lavender you think of when you imagine the beautiful-smelling plant that fills the fields of Provence. This gorgeous tropical nature shares its beautiful color, but is not the same thing. Use a pot of ‘Mona Lavender’ plectranthus as your container garden to add an unexpected pop of color to any outdoor space. It will brighten the shorter days of fall and add wow to your yard.
Planting a conventional turfgrass lawn is not a water-wise solution in the arid West. Nor is paving a big area always practical, since that much hardscape creates a lot of heat and glare, says Nate Downey of Santa Fe Permaculture. But if you lace paving stones with ribbons of native buffalo grass (Buchloe dactyloides), you'll achieve an eye-calming "soft patio" effect, as Downey calls it, that needs much less water than a traditional bluegrass or fescue lawn.
This is a super cute idea that can be manifested in any sized yard. Even if you have a smaller fence, you can easily create tiny wooden flower boxes out of spare wood or particle board. If you plan on making these garden boxes, you can prevent the wood from becoming soggy from water by lining them or place individual flower pots into the wooden box. You can make these any color you’d like and even mix and match colors and shapes for an even more interesting approach.
Revamp a small patio by adding some funky plants or interesting patio furniture. Again, you could easily scale up or down depending on the space, but this type of revamping can be super simple if you’re using things you already have on hand or using things you are refurbishing. Have a bunch of old pots? Repaint them and add some of your favorite herbs for a tiny potted herb garden. Have an old coffee table? Stain it or add some cut out tiles to create your own mosaic outdoor patio table.

A superior backyard makes for superior living, period. It is a reminder that you needn’t invest large sums of money and time to fly to the far ends of the earth for a little R&R, but need only step outside. The best backyards combine all the simplicity of time-honored joys with the eye-appeal of modern design. No more mismatched lawn chairs and unsightly patches of neglected turf; it’s time to take your backyard to the next level. And with warmer seasons just a month away, now is your moment to seize these cool backyard ideas and unique possibilities.


Building large retaining walls is not considered a DIY project. If you need a tall wall, chances are you have an erosion problem just waiting to happen and need to call on a professional. By contrast, though, simple terracing jobs are excellent DIY landscaping projects for beginners. After building small stone retaining walls, you can plant behind them, as you would for a raised bed.
This deck-top container garden is a study in variation in similarity, proving just how beautiful the simple repetition of a shape or color can be in creating a relaxing outdoor space. Here, three ceramic containers in a subtle shade of turquoise hold a variety of beautiful plants. In the largest pot, working from back to front and tallest to shortest, densely plant 'Liberty Classic Yellow' snapdragon, 'Bouquet Rose Magic' dianthus, and 'Tickled Pink' veronica. Place 'New Look' dusty miller and 'Lemon Ball' sedum in the front to trail over the edge. Pack a powerful, single-note punch in the two smaller pots by planting 'Supertunia Vista Bubblegum' petunia in the midsize container and more sedum in the smallest.
Are you dreaming of a summer vacation, but the only thing on the horizon is more heat and humidity? This may not be a balmy getaway, but bringing the Tropics to your doorstep is a breeze with this combo: this beautiful container with a water-inspired glaze has a gorgeous array of plants that burst forth like a sunburst on a bright day. You’ll love giant-leaved, sunny ‘Maui Gold’ elephant’s ear; heavily blooming, fiery orange SunPatiens; velvety, fragrant citronella plant; purple iridescent Persian shield; and a heavenly skirt of angel vine spilling down the sides. If you listen closely you will be able to hear the ocean.
I worry about the fact that you’ve used wood from an old deck in the garden. Wood for decks and play structures until recently was usually pressure-treated with an arsenic solution and is now regarded as toxic. I hope you’ll get the wood tested. It seriously isn’t anything to take lightly. The EPA halted sales of most wood treated this way in 2004, but it had been used for twenty years beforehand. Here’s the EPA website on pressure-treated wood:
We saved thousands going this same route where we hired a landscape architect to create a design. Ours was more like $700 for a 1/4 acre with a lot if detail. We have installed the plan ourselves. The front yard alone would have cost at least $6000 but we were able to create beds, borders, and put in the plantings for only $800 and this took three days of work. So happy we went this route.

General Disclaimer: Get Rich Slowly is an independent website managed by J.D. Roth, who is not a trained financial expert. His knowledge comes from the school of hard knocks. He does his best to provide accurate, useful info, but makes no guarantee that all readers will achieve the same level of success. If you have questions, consult a trained professional.

A month after we received our plans, a local nursery had a 40%-off “going out of business” sale.  With the designer's list in hand, we were able to purchase about a third of our total plant materials at a substantial discount. We were worried because we weren't anywhere near ready to put them into the ground yet. Fortunately, we live in a mild climate, and the plants survived several months in pots. 
My brother does all my landscaping because he enjoys it. I am lucky if I get to weed the flag flower bed. He doesn’t trust me cause he knows what he has planted. LOL. We get our mulch free from the city. It is pretty good and we have never had a problem with it especially after all the storms we have had lately. You have to load it yourself and unload it yourself but it is worth it to us. I get a lot of free plants, gravel, stones, and even mulch on freecycle. My best freecycle find for the yard was a 1920’s concrete fountain as tall as me (in four parts). It is awesome. I also got several bags of those white landscaping pebbles. I had to rebag them cause the bags were in bad shape from sitting outside for years but the rocks were fine. Working in the yard is always fun and very rewarding. I would never pay anybody to work in my yard. I did the work myself when I bought my house. I reclaimed the back pasture with a lawnmower and a limb cutter. It was hard work but I did a little every night after work and it finally got done, even cleaned out the creek so it runs again now. My brother researches everything on the internet since he is disabled and can’t talk to strangers.
One last point about watering deeply: If your topsoil is only two inches deep, laying down an inch of water is a bad idea. An inch of water is good for watering 12 inches of soil. Further, an inch of water will effectively carry a lot of soil nutrients down deeper. So if your soil is only two inches deep, this rinses away a lot of your soil nutrients! So deep watering should be done only in conjunction with deep soil.

If you are thinking about doing this lawn care thing as a bidness, then I would like to point you toward my buddy Patrick's lawn care business stuff. He has been helping folks make a go at lawn care income for damn near ten years. He provides all sorts of bean counting, newsletters, advertising and ... the center showpiece, lawn care software. As an added bonus, for every 100 people that click on this stuff, Patrick has agreed to give me pie. You want me to have to have pie don't you?


Kris and I have done a lot of work on this house and yard. We’ve done some of this ourselves, but we’ve also opted to pay others to do certain tasks. As I mentioned earlier this summer, we just paid to have work done on our electrical system. I’m okay wiring an outlet or a switch, but I didn’t feel comfortable replacing the old knob-and-tube wiring.

Take glorious fall color right up to your door by mixing the blazing tones of orange and yellow with cool shades of purple and blue. First, encircle a copper container with a bittersweet wreath (fresh or faux). To contrast with the orange berries, add ‘Lemon Ball’ sedum and the regal hues of purple cabbage. Spice up the center with ‘Calypso Orange’ ornamental peppers and ‘Cosmic Yellow’ cosmos. Crown the look with a halo of Mexican bush sage. Stack pumpkins on the steps for additional color. Provide full sun and moderate water and the display will flourish through the fall. When it's done, just plant the sedum in your yard to continue the show.
These beautiful containers can make every step up your stairs seem like the first step ever into your home.  If you choose similarly colored containers, you will let the flowers do all the talking. For this beautiful arrangement, the containers are in soft neutrals, while the blooms bring the heat. The 'Caliente Pink' geraniums, 'Surfinia Rose Veined' petunias, and 'Techno Heat Light Blue' lobelias create a soft and feminine color palette for this doorstep welcome. Geraniums, petunias, and lobelias will all thrive in similar conditions, so caring for this bright container garden wonder will be simple. Step up to this gorgeous arrangement today.
Add this idea to your cheap garden landscaping ideas bank! Not only are stepping stone paths adorable, but they can actually prove to be quite useful. Stepping stones really don’t cost much at all to buy, but if you have stones on hand, you can easily create your own stepping path. Creating these types of paths look great in any garden setting, even in front yards. You don’t necessarily have to have a garden in order to create a great stepping stone path, but if you do incorporate them into an already existing garden, you can easily create interesting shapes, sizes and styles.
Using a variety of shades of green is a wonderful landscaping idea and a way to add depth to your plantings. Bright chartreuse greens (as seen in these 'Frisia' honey locust trees) catch the eye and stand out in the landscape, especially compared to the darker, richer tones often found in evergreens. Blue-greens add a softness and almost always harmonize well with other shades of the color.
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