You’ll be phobia-free about welcoming these spiders into your home—spider plants, that is. For this flowing composition that can create color throughout your garden, Red ‘Freida Hemple’ caladiums, a spider plant, and a ‘Little Gem’ Southern magnolia decorate a large pot in the corner. This helps hide a downspout, and fills the space with bright beauty. Working with the idea that repetition creates rhythm, and that builds to a harmonious container garden, smaller pots of the same caladiums tie the grouping together. The boldness of the plants is contrasted with the simple, neutral containers. Think of using natural tones in stone and off-white for these outdoor container compositions.

Pebbles are an easy way to bring different colours and textures to your backyard. You can use them to fill up empty spaces in your garden beds or as ground cover to compliment a paved or decking area. For a clean, decorative look you can use pebbles to create a border or landscape a path. There are a range of colours and styles to choose from including white, blue, orange, red, green, lime, silver and gold. By using the same colour pebble you can keep it simple or mix the colours to create a more vibrant look.


We are gardeners by heart, we love organic home-grown vegetables and herbs and we can browse for hours through landscaping ideas or how-tos on how to grow the perfect plants at home. We know how dirt feels between our fingers and how thrilling it can be to see your first seed blossom. We know how important it is that people learn and know the right facts on what the grow and put in their body. Planted Well stands for organic & home-grown and want to help you and the world to blossom into a better place.

Succulents equal low-maintenance. For this simple-means-surprising container a vintage sorghum pot is filled with cold-hardy succulents that bloom in the fall. They are paired with flowers that attract masses of bees and need also need little water. What this means is that you’re helping the natural ecosystem while putting few additional strains on its resources—by encouraging bees you’ll be helping nature’s pollinators, but the choice of plants with few water requirements you may also allow nature to meet their needs. That’s smart container gardening. Since the container itself—a vintage sorghum pot—is also repurposed, this is a wonderful way to approach your rustic backyard back yard container garden.

Combine several English ivy topiaries and a clipped lemon cypress to accent a garden table. You’ll be able to sit down, yet feel as if you are strolling through a classic parterre garden. Mix spirals, globes, columns, and lollipop shapes of varying heights—you’ll love how simple it is to help these topiaries maintain their beautiful shapes. Unify the look by planting everything in terra-cotta pots. We love the flared sides of these clean and simple pots by Campo de' Fiori (campodefiori.com). The topiaries are by Schubert Nursery (schubertnursery.com), and should be readily available at your local garden center.
By carefully sculpting the landscape and choosing the right plants and materials, you can hide an unattractive driveway. With only a few steps, that less-than-picture perfect portion of your home can be transformed into a gardener’s paradise. Start by creating a slightly raised island of lawn in the center of the drive. Then, add a low boxwood hedge toward the back of the island with roses, annuals, and perennials rising above the hedge in the front. Blend a variety of colors, textures, and heights for a great look. Try 'Crystal Fairy' rose for height, lamb's ears for texture, and 'Butterfly Deep Rose' pentas for color.
Use the same thoughtful approach to hardscaping as you would with plants: Evaluate your choices based on budget to buy, install, and upkeep as well as time you have to maintain it yourself. "People don't do the research and spend time learning about how to do projects successfully," says Miller. "Do your prep and be patient, but if you really want it and are not patient, hire somebody to do it right." Check out our landscaping materials guide.
Don’t confuse Plectranthus, or ‘Mona Lavender,’ for the lavender you think of when you imagine the beautiful-smelling plant that fills the fields of Provence. This gorgeous tropical nature shares its beautiful color, but is not the same thing. Use a pot of ‘Mona Lavender’ plectranthus as your container garden to add an unexpected pop of color to any outdoor space. It will brighten the shorter days of fall and add wow to your yard.
The real difference between a project that you do yourself and one that is professionally done is performance, speed and repair. If you are looking only at how much money you can save, what does that matter if what you’ve done isn’t right? A landscaping project is one place where this thought is made clear. The act of sodding, planting trees, and creating flower beds, among other things, is back breaking, but doable. The knowledge can be learned by reading several books and studying up on different schools of thought, but you don’t need to know codes, understand how to calculate soil compaction, or cubic water pressure.
Get out the wire patterns and get ready to make some amazing shapes because once you have boxwood in your container garden you will want to give them their own unique identities. Boxwood’s willingness to be clipped, shaped, and trained makes it the perfect candidate for a classic topiary. There are guides for learning tips and tricks to achieve the perfect topiary design. We’ve got images of the amazing topiary skills of Pearl Fryar—and you may one day wish to emulate his creative skills—so get clipping, and with skill and patience you’ll soon have your boxwood topiaries in tip-top shape.
Often, a critical component of achieving an effective design is maximizing the amount of usable space available. You may have a huge lot in back of your house, but if it's all on a slope, the space may be unusable (at least for some of the activities you'd like to use the area for). In such a case, building a deck may be the solution, whether it be attached to the house or a floating deck. View these deck pictures for some ideas.
Using stone or concrete slabs like the ones depicted are great when creating outdoor paths. Stone or concrete slabs shouldn’t cost you that much to purchase, but if you have a larger outdoor landscaped area, odds are you might already have some extras on hand. If not, you can easily find materials to create walking paths throughout your outdoor space at garden centers or home improvement stores. You may even have some friends or relatives that are getting rid of older garden materials. You can use virtually anything when it comes to constructing garden paths.
Certain ornamental grasses, like maiden grass, are resistant to dog traffic without having sharp blades that will cut or otherwise injure your pup. This greenery holds its shape throughout the year, and will give your dog plenty of space to play. That being said, what’s more important than planting dog-resistant plants is planting species that are not harmful to dogs. Some flowers, like azaleas and daffodils, can be toxic to dogs and should not be planted in a place where they might accidentally be ingested.
Once a boring courtyard, this renovation in Naples, Florida became an outdoor space that reflects the color of flair of its location. Designed by Malibu West Interiors, the patio is surfaced in a non-skid textured porcelain tile. The pool coping was custom-cast in concrete to mimic the shape of the swimming pool. A colorful wall piece was made of teak with pops of glass tile.
Add a water feature: Water features add ambience to your yard. They vary in degrees of difficulty, but you can install a water feature yourself without worry if you follow the directions on the packaging. First, decide if you would like to add a freestanding feature that simply needs to be assembled and plugged in or if you’re creating a water feature area in your yard in which you will need to install a reservoir basin and bubbling water kit. Consult with your local garden center to determine which kit will work best for your project, then get creative! Once you dig the trench and install the reservoir, you can enhance its surroundings with natural rocks, flat stones, tiles, bricks or concrete and short groundcover plants. You can add aquatic plants such as lily pads for full effect!
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I once moved to a house that was infested with both bindweed and thistle. Imagine my yard as a big rectangle. I started pulling weeds on the left and stopped about ten percent of the way across. A few days later, I started at the left again and picked out anything that cropped up in the last few days and then made a little progresss into the rest of the rectangle. Each brief weeding trip gets me another 5% of new territory. The important thing is to always weed the area you already weeded first. If I didn't do it this way, then the weed would recover in the first section while I was attacking another section.
Using white to lighten your garden is a great way to let the tone of plants themselves be the neutral foundation for the design you build upon. Here several large pots of white impatiens filled to bursting brighten this shady corner with hundreds of blooms. Apart from being filled with one type of plant, these white impatiens are planted in a single style of container—this can help to tie your outdoor space together. If you are planning on planting several different container garden features, consider choosing separate planters for each, or choose a single planter to create a sense of harmony.
There is nothing more natural in a landscape than grass. If you’re wanting to save some money on a landscaping idea, try incorporating this natural element into the scene as heavily as possible. Grass doesn’t get enough credit. It’s a gorgeous color, it grows easily and odds are, it’s already existent in your landscape. In this funky scene, stepping stones are used to create an interesting pattern in the grass. The brilliant green just cuts between the stones creating a fun shape that is definitely an eye-catcher.
Have some broken down furniture you don’t know what to do with? Use them in the garden to create a rustic landscape! You already have the stuff – so you might as well put them to good use. Anything from broken wooden benches, stools or wagon wheels (like the ones depicted) can easily create some character in any sort of garden setting. I can imagine a steer or longhorn skull somewhere in this scene – so if you by chance have one lying around, that could also be used! Don’t go and kill a steer, though. That would defeat the purpose of “refurbishing!”
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A month after we received our plans, a local nursery had a 40%-off “going out of business” sale.  With the designer's list in hand, we were able to purchase about a third of our total plant materials at a substantial discount. We were worried because we weren't anywhere near ready to put them into the ground yet. Fortunately, we live in a mild climate, and the plants survived several months in pots. 
Kris and I have done a lot of work on this house and yard. We’ve done some of this ourselves, but we’ve also opted to pay others to do certain tasks. As I mentioned earlier this summer, we just paid to have work done on our electrical system. I’m okay wiring an outlet or a switch, but I didn’t feel comfortable replacing the old knob-and-tube wiring.
A backyard landscaping design is more informal than its front-yard counterpart, where elaborate walkways are common. But regardless of whether it's to wend your way between flower beds or vegetable gardens, or to traverse your green grass, you'll probably want to have some sort of informal path cutting through the area. A path of garden stepping stones may be just the right solution.
The historical term for a classically designed French garden is a 'parterre garden.' Some of its most famous examples are actually in England, including the fabulous—and recently recreated—geometric garden at Hanbury Hall. This container garden, with its formal structure and arrangement, takes both its inspiration and its design from the parterre garden design concept—but the container gardening part of the process is still incredibly simple. Regardless of your overall garden design plan, you can add some height to the center of any flowerbed by placing a very vertical potted plant in its middle. Here, a potted rosemary topiary rises above the other edibles in this bed. What is so sensational about this approach is that it uses a traditional language, but with new, timesaving gardening innovations.
A backyard landscaping design is more informal than its front-yard counterpart, where elaborate walkways are common. But regardless of whether it's to wend your way between flower beds or vegetable gardens, or to traverse your green grass, you'll probably want to have some sort of informal path cutting through the area. A path of garden stepping stones may be just the right solution.
Beautiful and inspiring pictures, great principles, it gave me what I needed for my project. For people new to the details involved in plants, there's not a lot of information in this book, but that's not what it set out to achieve. It's a great 'one of many' you should have in your collection if directing your landscaping, or wanting to be part of the decision-making process.
Incorporating pots into landscaping not only makes a yard more low-maintenance, but also more versatile. "We love to use pots, especially for clients who want color in different parts of the yard," says Peyton. "Plus, pots are easy to move around. If you're having a party on your patio, you can move them to that area." For an added pop of color, coordinate the flowers to the season — try whites and pinks in the spring and summer, and switch to yellows and reds in the fall.
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