General Disclaimer: Get Rich Slowly is an independent website managed by J.D. Roth, who is not a trained financial expert. His knowledge comes from the school of hard knocks. He does his best to provide accurate, useful info, but makes no guarantee that all readers will achieve the same level of success. If you have questions, consult a trained professional.
Replacing lawn with a ground cover of rocks or large boulder accents cuts down on upkeep and the need for irrigation. In addition to adding a rugged look to your backyard, sand- or stone-based ground cover can double as a weed suppressor and foundation for stepping stones. Moreover, choose low-maintenance plants, like sedum or succulents, to plant in the rock garden for beautiful contrast.
In days past, the best way to find a lawn care professional to service your lawn was to pull out the yellow pages and look up someone in your area or simply just choose a lawn service company that sounded good. LawnStarter has simplified the process and made it better. The process is now completely automated through our website from arranging for someone to come out and mow your yard to paying for the service. We also have friendly customer service experts on-hand to help you with every step of the process. With Lawnstarter, you can rest assured that you're only getting the top-rated lawn service professionals. We bring you the top-rated lawn care services in your area.
On the other hand, an easy-maintenance ground cover is a great and cost-effective alternative to grass. Thyme, bishop’s weed, and lamium spread quickly over room-sized sections of a front and back lawn, and remain hearty through temperature and drought swings. Simply plant around 10 creeping ground cover plants (more if you want faster coverage or you’re dealing with an area larger than a bedroom) for between $5 and $10 each. They should quickly germinate and take over portions of your yard with beautiful leaves and flowers.
A month after we received our plans, a local nursery had a 40%-off “going out of business” sale.  With the designer's list in hand, we were able to purchase about a third of our total plant materials at a substantial discount. We were worried because we weren't anywhere near ready to put them into the ground yet. Fortunately, we live in a mild climate, and the plants survived several months in pots. 

Everyone in the South understands that college sports are a fun-filled family pastime, and what better way to show and share your team spirit than to bring your favorite colors into your container garden? This beautiful design brings the Bengal Tigers—the plants in this LSU-themed container all thrive in part sun and moist potting mix. You’ll find a range of shades of purple from bright and bold, to subtle and sublime, all set in a celebratory container. You can take this idea and substitute the colors of your favorite team for a seasonal celebration that brings together nature and culture—and what could be better?


Using sturdy materials like 2 x 4’s and hardware cloth, you can fashion trellises for all of your climbing and vining edibles. Not only will doing this make the plants easier to harvest, but it also allows more room in the ground for vegetables and herbs that tend to bush or clump. Small pumpkins, summer squash, cucumbers, peas, and green beans will love scrambling up the trellis, and they’ll be easier to maintain and harvest when their long vines are elevated.
Sprinkle a little sawdust on the spot and give the spot a little attention from your hose. The sawdust will hide the poop and it will counter the excess nitrogen. Combining with the nitrogen, it will, in time, turn into compost - enriching the soil. The sawdust will also reduce any odor by about 95%. The water will wet the sawdust and dilute the nitrogen source a bit, thus helping the beginning of the composting process.
Using a variety of shades of green is a wonderful landscaping idea and a way to add depth to your plantings. Bright chartreuse greens (as seen in these 'Frisia' honey locust trees) catch the eye and stand out in the landscape, especially compared to the darker, richer tones often found in evergreens. Blue-greens add a softness and almost always harmonize well with other shades of the color.
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