Purple fountain grass looks great in containers. Its vertical shape creates an exclamation point in the border. Then, its purplish-red leaves and fall plumes combine well with the red coleus below. This grass and the coleus are not winter hardy in most areas, but new plants bought in spring are inexpensive and grow quickly, so you can enjoy this pairing from early spring until late in the fall. You’ll have its beautiful memories to get you through any harsh winters, and the anticipation of it growing again will have you excited to be back in your garden at the first opportunity in the spring.

Using a color palette based on the tones of a tree in the center of the garden, O Plus L blended the interior with the exterior of this California Modernist home in Pacific Palisades known as the Ravoli Estate. This was achieved by using the same surface and flooring materials inside and out and echoing the home's horizontal lines in the backyard.  
Make easy hanging wall planters by using wooden pallets. Since wooden pallets are typically already sectioned out, you can easily just hang a half of a wooden pallet up on a brick or sturdy wall to create your own hanging green house! You can put all sorts of tiny plants or herbs into the boxes and create a live growing space you and your friends will surely enjoy. If you’d rather use the wooden pallet for something other than a growing spot, like maybe a garden shelf, you can just as easily do that too!
BLACK MEDIC is a sign of low nitrogen soil. Refer to fertilizing above. The above methods will keep black medic in check. You will occassionally see a little once in a while, but it is kinda pretty when it isn't taking over your lawn. This stuff is sometimes called "yellow clover". When it's taking over, it will choke out grass and make flat mats about a foot in diameter. I found a litte in my current lawn and it was a single tiny strand with little yellow flowers.
A superior backyard makes for superior living, period. It is a reminder that you needn’t invest large sums of money and time to fly to the far ends of the earth for a little R&R, but need only step outside. The best backyards combine all the simplicity of time-honored joys with the eye-appeal of modern design. No more mismatched lawn chairs and unsightly patches of neglected turf; it’s time to take your backyard to the next level. And with warmer seasons just a month away, now is your moment to seize these cool backyard ideas and unique possibilities.
Forgiving succulents are both heat and drought tolerant, so they'll look great all summer long. There are many novel ways to plant succulent containers, particularly since they are so resilient. Terra cotta pots work particularly well since they transfer moisture well and help succulents retain water. They also share a desert color palette with succulents, making the two appear as if they were always intended to go together. You may group a variety of succulents together, or create a container for your garden filled with a single type. Whatever your choice, water carefully and selectively, and these resilient plants will reward you with a beautiful container garden.

These arrangements look best when you combine plants with three different profiles – vertical (such as upright fuchsia or fountain grass), horizontal (like impatiens or heliotrope), and cascading (like the asparagus fern or wave petunias). This striking landscape display only costs about $50 for the planters and $30 to $50 for the plants, depending on the types you purchase.
But we don’t stop there. As one of the area’s premier lawn care companies, we can also provide extended services to care for your whole landscape. For instance, our crew of yard service professionals can keep your landscape looking immaculate with our mowing, edging, trimming, and related services. Our tree and shrub care experts can keep your ornamental foliage looking beautiful and healthy. We even have a landscape design/build team, including licensed landscape architects, which can work with you from start to finish to create a beautiful outdoor retreat, complete with elements such as terraced gardens, comfortable sitting areas, a charming stone pathway, or any other idea you can envision.
Hanging baskets follow the same recipe as containers as far as plant care goes. But instead of an upright thriller plant, you want more spillers and fillers—an upright thriller obviously won’t work as well. Calibrachoa in red, purple, and yellow can fill out fast with blooms that look like miniature petunias, so it makes a container overflow with interest quickly. It also covers the container, making the flowers, rather than the container itself, the center of attention. Consider planting calibrachoas by color, or mix them together, depending on your design plan and personal preference. Either way, your hanging baskets with be eye-grabbers.
If you love working with plants, a large rose or vegetable garden is the perfect use of land; if you live in a hot or dry area, consider drought-tolerant landscape ideas. If you have younger kids, consider what they would enjoy as well, such as a large grassy area or a playground, swing set or pool. Think about what your family would use the most, as well as what would help boost your resell value in the long run. Lastly, when it comes to landscapes, be sure to consider different front and backyard ideas, as they are separate entities that serve two very different purposes.
This is not something you need a chicken hutch to have in your back garden. Instead, these beautiful low-growing Hen and Chicks plants fill this vintage metal planter. The silver undertones of the leaves mirror the copper finish of the tub. The Southern Living Garden Book describes Hen and Chicks as Mexican natives with 'rosettes of fleshy leaves,' and that is simply the perfect description for these succulent perennials. Available in a wide range of colors, you will be able to choose the Hen and Chicks that best fit the tone of your container garden. Or, mix and match to your heart’s delight and revel in their subtle variations.
Prized for both its flavor and its aroma, mint can be an incredible herb to have growing in a garden container. What’s more, its bright green leaves can bring in a pop of color. Left uncontrolled, however, mint can have a tendency to overrun an outdoor space. With this in mind, you will want to keep more invasive herbs, like mints, contained in pots in your kitchen garden. Pick your mint based on the flavor you want and whether you’d prefer it for tea or for flavoring food—you’ll be thrilled by mint’s wondrous varieties.
In order to retain the easy upkeep of your garden, you will want to choose low maintenance landscaping plants. These types of plants can grow and prosper with little water and do not require trimming and other care. Some easy large or small yard ideas include planting bushes such as the plumbago ariculata or leocophyllum frutescens. These bushes are water conserving plants that do not require irrigation or frequent watering.

We're making our list of Container Gardening Ideas great with a tip that will have you thinking outside the box—or planter. Consider using a cast-concrete pool for a miniature garden. You’ve probably already considered these for many other garden design applications, but they are far better suited to container gardening than you might have imagined. Because these pools are made to accommodate plumbing, there are already holes in the bottom that allow for drainage. Make use of what seems like a fortuitous accident, and capitalize on their often-wonderful designs. Then place plants like hostas, violas, and blue phlox straight in. They’ll grow wonderfully in their new pool that’s become a smart new planter.
Flagstone skirting a simple columnar fountain gives the impression of a path winding through a canyon. Yellow- and blue-flowering plants, such as agastache, butterfly bush, and Spanish broom, provide plenty of color near the entry and along the driveway and attract desired winged guests. The fountain in the center provides butterflies with a necessary supply of water.

Attractive landscaping deserves to be seen after hours, which is where landscape lights come into play. The lights play many roles, from adding to the home's attractiveness to illuminating steps and sidewalks for safety to showcasing points of interest in the landscape. Placing lights alongside paths and walkways is one of their most common uses, although that doesn't mean they have to be set in straight lines at prescribed intervals. You can place them on alternate sides of a sidewalk to break up a line.
But for those who shun such a laissez-faire approach to landscaping, the resources below will provide some handy tips on pest control. Deer (and the ticks they bring) are a major pest in some regions. But you can stay organic and humane while still keeping the deer at bay, by using fencing or restricting yourself to deer-resistant plants, such as lavender
From the first ideas to the final plantings, planning is key. That's why you must break out the gridded graph paper and sketch a detailed plan for how you want your landscape to look. Having a map of your intended designs notated with plantings and plots will help you first imagine what should go where and then bring your vision to fruition. (It’s also a handy guide to keep nearby when you’re elbow deep in hostas and can’t remember how many rows you meant to plant.)
Make your outdoor space your dining room by adding some great chairs and a table. Who says picnics are meant for summer? With an outdoor dining area, every meal could be eaten outside! Even if you have a smaller patio area, you could easily incorporate a pretty great dining set which could be made absolutely adorable by way of table settings, funky plants and even some hanging string lights. Add some comfy outdoor pillows for the chairs and you’ve got a ready-made party place just for you and your friends!

Assuming you are in the right zone for this type of planting, if you don't want to spend all of your time watering, stick with easy-care options in some of your containers. Succulents and bougainvilleas need little care in containers. You can choose succulents that will grow to create senses of scale and drama, such as agave, or aloe. Depending on your choice of succulent, some of these may grow as tall as ten feet high, so be are of their potential when planning your container garden. Then, prepare for a beautiful sight.


Tougher than Clint Eastwood, lantana parties in heat, chortles at drought, and blooms in a slew of sunny colors from spring to fall. Plus, its nectar-laden flowers attract pretty butterflies like moths to a flame. This beautiful plant is native to America, so if you want to focus on plants that will attract or entice wildlife, this can be a good choice. Lantana is also generally resistant to deer—they don’t find it particularly attractive, even though you will. So plant a container or two of this wonderful, durable plant, then sit back and wait for your fluttering-winged visitors to arrive.
Calibrachoa looks like a miniature petunia. Forming a trailing mound, it’s perfect for pots and hanging baskets. Be careful to ensure that your calibrachoas have good drainage, because they require it—so they are better in containers than they are in garden beds. You’ll love the names of your calibrachoas too: Million Bells, Mini Famous, Cabaret, Can-Can, and the positively powerful Superbells are just a few of your choices. So whether you want to ring a ton of bells, have a little fame, do a little dance, or see a show, these are the perfect solution for your container garden.
Unlimited Lawn Care is a locally owned and operated lawn care company, providing a wide assortment of lawn service options designed to maximize your enjoyment of your outdoor environment. In addition to our standard year-round lawn care program, we also are proud to provide services such as pest control for fire ants, fleas, ticks, and other harmful lawn insects. We also provide lawn aeration and over-seeding for fescue lawns, core aeration for Bermuda and zoysia lawns, and even moisture management and other soil services to ensure your lawn’s growing environment is optimized.
As any seasoned landscaper or gardener can tell you, a home’s landscape is more than just a few haphazardly placed trees and shrubs. It requires careful thought, planning, and research – not to mention hard work. Not only can well-designed landscaping increase the pleasure you derive from your dwelling, it can boost curb appeal if you need to sell your home.
Using stone or concrete slabs like the ones depicted are great when creating outdoor paths. Stone or concrete slabs shouldn’t cost you that much to purchase, but if you have a larger outdoor landscaped area, odds are you might already have some extras on hand. If not, you can easily find materials to create walking paths throughout your outdoor space at garden centers or home improvement stores. You may even have some friends or relatives that are getting rid of older garden materials. You can use virtually anything when it comes to constructing garden paths.
Consider a Hybrid Approach It's a newer approach but one that Miller finds more and more landscape designers and homeowners using: a combination of professional installation and do-it-yourself landscaping. "Most homeowners either can conquer much more or much less than they think they can," Miller says. "They'll begin a project and get overwhelmed. So you really need to think if you want to spend your next ten weekends breaking your back, or have someone help you."
If you are thinking about doing this lawn care thing as a bidness, then I would like to point you toward my buddy Patrick's lawn care business stuff. He has been helping folks make a go at lawn care income for damn near ten years. He provides all sorts of bean counting, newsletters, advertising and ... the center showpiece, lawn care software. As an added bonus, for every 100 people that click on this stuff, Patrick has agreed to give me pie. You want me to have to have pie don't you?
Julie Moir Messervy's vision for composing landscape of beauty and meaning is furthering the evolution of landscape design and changing the way people create and enjoy their outdoor surroundings. With over three decades of experience, eight books (incuding Home Outside and Outside the Not So Big House with Sarah Susanka), and numerous high-profile lectures, Messervy is an innovative leader in landscape and garden design theory and practice. Her landscape architecture and design firm, JMMDS, is located in Saxtons River, Vermont.
To make a terrarium, choose a glass container with an opening wide enough for your hand. Gently add an inch or two of washed, fine gravel. Top gravel with a thin layer of activated aquarium carbon. (You'll find both items at your local pet store.) Next, add moistened potting soil, and you'll be ready to plant. Create a collection of plants, or showcase just one. Good choices include ferns, succulents, mosses, miniature moth orchids, African violets, and kalanchoes. How often you need to water or fertilize your terrarium will depend upon the type of plants you choose, but this is a beautiful way to enjoy container gardening.

Bigger is not always better, and a judicious use of these tiny succulents is a case in point why. Rather than overwhelm small spaces with large plantings, here is a great lesson in how to use containers to fill bare spots in your garden. This concrete planter, tucked into a planting of dianthus, is filled with tiny textured succulents, pulling you in for a closer look. This creates a contemplative moment of intimacy and pause, a time for simple reflection, and a sense of communion with these delicate plants. These tiny plants are like a whisper in the garden, quietly asserting what it is they have to say.


Flagstone skirting a simple columnar fountain gives the impression of a path winding through a canyon. Yellow- and blue-flowering plants, such as agastache, butterfly bush, and Spanish broom, provide plenty of color near the entry and along the driveway and attract desired winged guests. The fountain in the center provides butterflies with a necessary supply of water.
A backyard landscaping design is more informal than its front-yard counterpart, where elaborate walkways are common. But regardless of whether it's to wend your way between flower beds or vegetable gardens, or to traverse your green grass, you'll probably want to have some sort of informal path cutting through the area. A path of garden stepping stones may be just the right solution.

Although they may not be the first thing that come to mind, don’t ignore edibles when selecting your planting materials. Different varieties of lettuce have beautiful color and texture, and can add both visual interest and an unexpected kitchen surprise to your container garden. Here, several leafy edibles mix with violas and mums. These leafy greens will be a surprise to people who wonder what is creating the beautiful colors in your containers—and you’ll be just as surprised if you choose to let them be the centerpiece of something on your dinner plate.
After asking the neighbors for recommendations, we discovered somebody who might be able to help. A long-time landscaper had just sold his business to his son-in-law to focus strictly on home landscape design.  We scheduled an initial no-cost appointment with him, and instantly felt he had the skill and understanding to design a useable backyard we could enjoy. 

Garden pictures with best design ideas found in our online galleries provide great inspiration of how to create your own outside oasis no matter what your budget, size, climate or skill-level may be.  The newest 2017 garden design trends bring beauty to your landscape through bold vibrant colors, lavish contemporary features, unique outdoor lighting and locally grown plants. Regardless of the amount of garden design space available, design concept or your budget, these landscaping ideas can be implemented in any yard to enhance outside living spaces and give your family and friends a unique outdoor refuge. Do you want to incorporate these trends and bring beauty to your neglected outdoor space but are unsure how to begin? From 2017 to 2017, the latest trends on popular ideas for small gardens to large backyard landscaping layouts let DIY Home Design Ideas show you how to transform any drab and desolate yard into a beautiful and relaxing sanctuary.
Landscaping involves a lot of choices that you need to make on the fly. When you see that a plant isn’t doing well, or that aphids are eating your favorite flower, you need to make quick decisions on how you are going to handle the problem. When you choose to do your own landscaping you can make those choices and alter the care of your yard and garden almost instantly. Hiring a landscaping company could lead to many missed phone calls and may take longer to fix a problem that needs to be solved immediately.

A sure sign that turf requires irrigation is a wilted appearance. One symptom is “footprinting,” footprints on the lawn that do not disappear within an hour. This symptom is soon followed by actual wilting, where the turf takes on a grayish or purple-to-blue cast. If only a few such spots regularly appear in the same general location, spot water them to delay watering the entire lawn for another day or so. These indicator spots help predict when the entire lawn needs watering.


Many landscaping plans and plant options available for backyard gardening is head-spinning! Professional landscape designers agree that the best way to start designing your dream garden is to first determine the size and shape of your new space. Begin by browsing online photo galleries, diy magazines and even your own neighborhood for beautiful flower bed designs. Current 2017 trends in easy garden planting ideas show designs with exotic tonal color combinations that have similar rather than contrasting shades. After determining your layout, head to your online plant nursery or home improvement center with a list of region appropriate plants to ensure that your new garden beds will thrive.
The problem is that its very difficult to get your money back when you sell your house if you spend thousands of dollars in landscaping. It’s one of those things that a home owner has to do – it goes with owning a house. I better way to get out of the work, since you know it isn’t compensated for when purchasing a house, it you buy a house that already has the landscaping done. So – when are you selling?
Your garden will seem wild, and it will certainly be full of life, when you have some 'Tiger' fern (a selection of Boston fern) in your container garden. Pair it with your tulips, Lavender Blue' and 'Purple Wing' Plentifall pansies, acorus, heuchera, and variegated ivy. These simply shaped concrete pots enhance any outdoor environment. Their angled geometry pairs well with the color and movement sprouting out of their tops. Let the plants grow and flow—the containers keep them just where you want them, creating a great harmony of color, and, as they drape over the edges, you’ll see where Plentifall pansies got their name.
Sometimes your container garden can focus as much on its structures as it does on its plants and flowers. With creative thinking, large pots can be repurposed around your yard. This unused pot fountain was repurposed as an accent table and stand for a cheerful container planting. In a similar vein, low columns can also form pedestals for containers. Look in antique stores, salvage yards, and related locations for unexpected finds that can ground your garden with creativity and history. Then, think outside the container and create new pieces that are uniquely yours.
Gravel’s earthy texture, its give underfoot, and its crunchy sound are the reasons why this oldest of hardscapes will always be perceived as the softest of paving materials. This gravel entry is a clean casual foil for plant textures and colors. Japanese silver grass billows over the basalt wall at right beside climbing hydrangea. ‘Maori Sunrise’ New Zealand flax in a container punctuates the small pond in the middle while ‘Palace Purple’ heuchera mugho pine and gunnera fill a bed near the house. Cotoneaster spills onto gravel.
This is my first year having a true garden, and so far I’m loving the time I get outside playing in the dirt and absorbing the sunshine. It’s certainly a nice break from my computer! As a beginner, I’m learning a lot of things that will make next year’s garden easier, and hopefully a little healthier, too. I don’t want to win the prize for the largest squash (not there yet), but I do want enough juicy tomatoes to last all summer long.
Tire planters are just about the cutest thing you can repurpose. They are just so versatile and look super great set up. You can paint the tires to create funky planters throughout the landscaping area, stack them up upon each other to create a cascading planter setup or even create a retaining walls just using these nifty things! The possibilities are endless when it comes to utilizing used tires in the garden because they are so versatile, so cheap and so easy to find in abundance!
Landscaping projects suitable for DIY homeowners range from very simple projects anyone can tackle to sophisticated, complex projects that take substantial work and resources. Homeowners seeking a helping hand can follow the instructions in the resource links below, which feature many of the most popular DIY landscaping projects. Because safety should always be of paramount concern, especially when working with power equipment, make sure to refer to the article on Home Safety Tips in the section on Outdoor Living.
Sometimes design is actually all about the form rather than the function—like when plants with distinctive visual features create amazing sights in a gorgeous garden setting. For such an approach to work, you’ll have to pay special attention to how the forms work together. For this design, textural plants construct a beautiful sense of high drama. This homeowner helped to create this sensation by adding spiky and vertical plants, such as ornamental grasses and caladiums, to her pots. Against the vast, multileveled, linear expanse of her back garden, with its beautiful pool, she created a sense of lightness and height simply by using plants that were always reaching towards the sky. Let your container gardens aim high!
Just because you want to give your landscape a facelift doesn’t mean you need to go rush out and purchase a whole bunch of expensive plants. There are so many plants you could incorporate into the scene that won’t set you back big bucks. In most garden centers, they typically showcase discounted or “out of season” plants that you could easily incorporate with spending too much money. If you’re feeling extra garden savvy, you could easily purchase seeds to plant instead of buying already sprouted plants. It may be a bit more difficult and it may take a bit longer, but it would be totally worth it in the end because you nurtured these plants to flourish and grow!

Purple fountain grass looks great in containers. Its vertical shape creates an exclamation point in the border. Then, its purplish-red leaves and fall plumes combine well with the red coleus below. This grass and the coleus are not winter hardy in most areas, but new plants bought in spring are inexpensive and grow quickly, so you can enjoy this pairing from early spring until late in the fall. You’ll have its beautiful memories to get you through any harsh winters, and the anticipation of it growing again will have you excited to be back in your garden at the first opportunity in the spring.
Choosing and placing plants is half the fun, though during this process, it's easy to become overwhelmed with choice. This step is guaranteed to be so much smoother if you do the research and planning in advance as you sketch your landscape map. (Bonus points for organizing your planting plan with a color-coded key!) If you're not sure where to begin, read through our picks for the 8 Best Plants to Grow and 10 Best Landscaping Ideas.
If you like the idea of celebrating the architectural impact of some truly special containers you’ve selected, you can elevate them for impact. In this elegant semi-formal garden, a pair of oversized urns are raised, then filled with pink verbenas and white bacopas. The urns are each set on a simple, flat stone capital atop a flagstone column. They create a columned entryway onto a flagstone path through the garden. The verbenas and bacopas cascade over the sides, creating a whimsical sense of movement, echoing the graceful lines of the garden’s architecture.
Combine several English ivy topiaries and a clipped lemon cypress to accent a garden table. You’ll be able to sit down, yet feel as if you are strolling through a classic parterre garden. Mix spirals, globes, columns, and lollipop shapes of varying heights—you’ll love how simple it is to help these topiaries maintain their beautiful shapes. Unify the look by planting everything in terra-cotta pots. We love the flared sides of these clean and simple pots by Campo de' Fiori (campodefiori.com). The topiaries are by Schubert Nursery (schubertnursery.com), and should be readily available at your local garden center.
From a simple penchant for yellow flowers as a child to becoming a full-time gardener, nature advocate, and garden designer, I am extremely happy to finally have a platform for me to successfully spread knowledge and expertise in the garden. After highschool graduation, I took many courses related to garden design to feed myself with more knowledge and expertise other than what I learned from my mom growing up. Soon as I finished courses, I gained more experience through internships and most especially, garden shows! I also tried to join as many garden design competitions locally. For any garden design inquiries, ping me!
More outdoor space means more chances to entertain in warm weather — and less work for you. "Creating outdoor living spaces lends itself to low-maintenance landscaping because you can extend your home while having fewer grassy areas to care for," says Peyton. The couple has a stone patio with a grilling area, dining table, and separate fire pit area in their home. Similarly, a deck is an equally low-maintenance option.
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