This abundantly rich and vibrant design puts the flowers in the spotlight. These will literally and figuratively be a beautiful sight. Perched atop a painted brick wall, the sleek container is covered by the overflowing blooms, which include sweeping pink petunias, super-delicate baby’s tears, and rounded clusters of rose-pink dianthus. For this arrangement, the focus is entirely on the flowers. In fact, the hidden pot is merely here to offer grounding support. Depending on your design, you may even wish to consider a series of these containers as a way to highlight a garden wall and bring color and emphasis to something you might have always wished to ignore. You won’t have to imagine the beauty—it will be right in front of you.
If variety is the spice of life, mixing tones and textures certainly brings both variety and life to this gorgeous small-scale container garden. Within a design scheme that could best be described as clean-rustic meets semi-modern, smooth metals and natural woods all combine into one harmonious whole. Rather than stick to a rigorous, single-plant approach, here a series of textural leaves gives a more modern look. An assortment of plants in shades of green anchors the backyard corner and adds depth in the small space. Settle in on the comfortable bench and enjoy a relaxing afternoon in this incredible container garden wonder.
What's right for your backyard is highly dependent on your climate. For the best low-maintenance planting results, look for native plants that thrive in your region. Not only are these plants typically easier to establish, but they also require far less water and overall maintenance to grow. As an added plus, your native plant garden will help support biodiversity by providing food and shelter to local fauna.
You can basically turn anything into a garden bed. It doesn’t really matter what you have laying around – if it can hold dirt, it can be a planter. In this awesome picture, these steel basins have become completely unique and eye-catching flower beds. The gravel or shale used on the garden floor surround these funky beds only makes that natural rustic feel come out. The basins seem to be a bit rusted over, but this really only adds to the charm of the scene.
Animal feed is often sold in very large, colorful plastic bags* that could almost double as works of art. Make a unique vertical planter by poking drainage holes in the bottom, cutting handles into the top for hanging, then adding potting soil and plants. It’s recycling at its best! (* If plastic begins to flake off over time, replace or keep away from water sources.) Photo courtesy of Chris McLaughlin.

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You can bring real definition to your backyard and create a great look with pavers. An easy project you can do yourself, pavers make a strong foundation for your outdoor entertaining area or you can run a pathway through your garden. You’ll find Bunnings has a range of different paver colours and designs to suit any backyard, from concrete textured pavers, panelstone and sandstone pavers and concrete log-style stepping stones.
Around your outdoor living space, add beds of mulch instead of grass. "It's one of the best investments you can have in your yard because mulch breaks down, fertilizes your plants, and prevents weeds," says Chris. "It's low-maintenance because you don't have to mow it or water it. It's also inexpensive and you only have to replace it in the spring." An added perk: Mulch also provides a pleasant aroma for your yard.
If you make the perfect plant selection for your container garden, no summer will see you shedding tears over a poor selection of plants. Instead, great growers like these Mini Cascade ivy geraniums will take the South’s harsh summer heat and just keep on blooming. Geraniums work wonders as part of a hanging container garden, blossoming to a rich, full, and verdant cascade of flowers spilling over and out of their planters. You’ll be excited by the rush of color, but even more thrilled with how simple these Cascading Geraniums are to maintain.

Choosing to do your own landscaping will ultimately save you money in the long run. Yes, there may be some up front costs of purchasing your own tools and buying the wrong fertilizer a time or two, but you won’t be paying to have a service come and do the landscaping for you. Many homeowners who choose to do their own landscaping work have other family members that can help out with the chores like spouses or kids. Tending to your own landscaping is a budget friendly option that many homeowners choose in order to save money.
With respect to its 1959 Midcentury Modern origins, (fer) studio, LLP oversaw site improvements of a Sherman Oaks hilltop home owned by Davis Factor, photographer and founder of Smashbox. Preserving its post-and-beam construction and rhythm, (fer) studio added a carport, cabana, and a gym with private patio to the master suite. Along the way, Factor bought the property next door and his home was expanded to include a 2,700-square-foot guest house.
These porch-step containers begin with bright pink and yellow zinnias—think 'Zowie! Yellow Flame' or 'Magellan Salmon'—which are one of our favorite flowers for their beautiful, round shape. Cooler 'filler' flowers, such as purple verbenas and blue calibrachoas are added to create contrast with texture and color. To make this container garden even simpler, opt for inexpensive plastic planters that are weatherproof and easy to move around. Grouping your containers in a tight space can help to create a homey, mini-garden vibe. Plus, when placed side by side, all of these incredible colors intensify. You’ll love to walk up to these bright wonders.
This abundantly rich and vibrant design puts the flowers in the spotlight. These will literally and figuratively be a beautiful sight. Perched atop a painted brick wall, the sleek container is covered by the overflowing blooms, which include sweeping pink petunias, super-delicate baby’s tears, and rounded clusters of rose-pink dianthus. For this arrangement, the focus is entirely on the flowers. In fact, the hidden pot is merely here to offer grounding support. Depending on your design, you may even wish to consider a series of these containers as a way to highlight a garden wall and bring color and emphasis to something you might have always wished to ignore. You won’t have to imagine the beauty—it will be right in front of you.
Three truly is the charm—flowers, that is, since the third flower brings together the two prevalent colors in this fantastic container garden arrangement. Simply adding a bicolored viola to this planter is a way to create a bold sense of visual interest while keeping all of the ease of maintaining this container garden. This fantastical planter has a cast relief of a gryphon on its side, bringing a sense of history and drama to the quiet softness of the flowers themselves. When considering this approach to your garden, look for a single planter that can form the centerpiece, and then complete your design around it.
One of the best ways to keep your garden looking fresh is to take advantage of seasonal sales at your local nursery, and to stock up on popular plants. And, since you want them to look beautiful until it is time to make them permanent additions to the landscape, keep them in their nursery pots. Then, display them in galvanized buckets on the porch until you are ready to plant them in your garden. You can easily recreate this look with gerbera daisies, salvias, shasta daisies, daylilies, and sweet potato vines. Look for similar pots at gardening or home-supply stores.
Mix gravel with rocks of varying sizes to add interest in large areas. This technique also solved a drainage problem. The gravel path, edged on the right with 'Libelle' hydrangea and a bank of maidenhair ferns, straddles a cluster of large, flat stones that creates a bridge over a seasonal runoff channel. Water runs through a pipe hidden beneath the channel's river rocks to a catchment pond at the far end.

A tip for lawn care experts: If you have a good feel for how often your lawn needs watering and it is almost that time and there is a rain shower - maybe a quarter of an inch - that is the BEST time to water your lawn and give it that other 3/4 of an inch. Remember, the grass roots are down deep and most weed roots are near the surface. The idea is to keep the top three inches of soil as dry as you can for as long as you can. That quarter of an inch might make it so that your top three inches is well watered but the lower 9 to 20 inches is on the edge of being pretty dry. This gives the weeds some advantage over your grass!
Mary McCoy, LMSW is a licensed social worker who works closely with individuals, families, and organizations in crisis. She knows first-hand how financial choices can prevent and mitigate crises, and she's therefore passionate about equipping people with the information they need to make solid financial decisions for themselves and their loved ones. When Mary isn't on her soap box, you can find her hiking, jogging, yoga-ing, or frolicking with her family.
One of the easiest and cheapest ways to transform your garden is to cut the lawn into a clearly defined shape – something like a circle, a square or an oblong. Mark it out with string and use a spade (try this Stainless Digging Spade by Spear & Jackson) to cut away the excess grass. It's not a difficult job and should only take an afternoon. And the best part? It costs absolutely nothing!

If you don’t have a whole lot of space to work with, you can easily transform an already existing area into a backyard or garden area. Take this converted driveway, for instance. If you have a driveway you aren’t using, you can easily add some plants, fencing and a great sitting area to create the illusion of a backyard. Have a garage you don’t use, either? You could transform it into a pretty great covered patio area or even a sort of garden area. Add a skylight to let in all that natural sunlight.


Tough-as-nails perennials are great when you want plants that can endure difficult back yard conditions. Yellow acorus, lime green euphorbia, purple viola, variegated ivy, and pink Lenten rose make this container pop. If you want to be you’re your containers look their best for the longest, you will want to try a tried-and-true approach. Combine Lenten roses with these three great plants and you will achieve maximum curb appeal, with fantastic durability:

"In a nutshell, what is the best way to go about beautifying my yard?" I am sometimes asked this rather broad question, and it's a tough one to answer. There are so many variables in do-it-yourself landscaping, such as budget, skills, the climate of your region, your personal design tastes, how you'll be using your yard, etc. But there are certain steps you can take that are so sound that they readily suggest themselves as answers to this question.


Despite their name, window boxes needn’t be hung only below windows. This charming barn gets even more character from being accented by window box plantings. Using whites and silvers for neutrals, the homeowner then accents with bold and bright pops of color, including selections from each of the primaries: red, yellow, and blue. In fact, set against the white and silver is a great deal of yellow. As she explains it, 'When I was studying graphic design in college, on the first day of class, my professor asked us to write down our least favorite color,' she recalls. 'I wrote, ‘yellow.’ So he made me use only that color for the entire semester. Now I love yellow, because I found out all the incredible things it can do to jolt the eye and bring light to shadow. Yellow works well with just about any other color. It makes you happy.'
This woven wicker basket is a natural way to decorate a bare wall in an outdoor space, and it will look just as beautiful whether you set it against brick, timber, or concrete. Pink zinnias and yellow tuberous begonias are the focal points or 'thrillers'. You’ll love the variation between the tighter, round zinnias and the softer, open petals of the begonias. Blue Cape plumbago and golden lantana add an extra hint of drama—think of these as the 'fillers'. Finally, English ivy, with its delicate, well-known shape, cascades over the side—that is the 'spiller', which gives this beautiful hanging container a sense of movement.
Establish a solid base for stone surfaces to avoid fix-ups later. If you are planning a stone patio, lay a six- to eight-inch layer of compacted pea stones first. "It will prevent weeds and keep your patio level," says Chris. "If you have a good base, it ends up being low-maintenance for decades to come. You won't have to be weeding things, pulling up stones, and re-leveling them."
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