Got an old utility or shoe rack lying around? Line the shelves with moss and plant herbs and vegetables to your heart’s content! Either lean the rack against an outside wall, or mount it. Watering tip: Moss drains very quickly, and many gardeners can get frustrated trying to keep their plants properly hydrated. To avoid this, add a layer of plastic with drainage holes below the moss.
Hanging containers are a simple way to bring gardens to limited spaces, or to add beauty to your space in simple yet unexpected ways. For this unique design, a mix of structural succulents gives the arrangement a bold internal architecture, and takes center stage in a simple hanging fiberclay planter. Purple fan flower punctuates the lush greenery. Fan flower is unique because all its blossoms have their segments on one side. In the Tropical South, these plants can also be evergreen. Given their bold, bright color, they offer a refreshing contrast to the deep, dark container suspended in the air.
You’ll be planning window boxes everywhere you can once you see how beautiful and simple this arrangement is—and how much it brightens this once-empty shady space on the side of the house. 'Aaron' caladium, holly fern, 'Key Lime Pie' heuchera, 'White Nancy' lamium, ivy, and light pink periwinkle come together in this eye-catching window box. This box emerges in a subtle sea of layers, each adding depth and color to the other. What is so unexpected is how easily this box stays in a palette of greens and yellows, relying on tone and variation to create a melody of color and shape. It may be a window box, but it is anything but boxed in.
Tougher than Clint Eastwood, lantana parties in heat, chortles at drought, and blooms in a slew of sunny colors from spring to fall. Plus, its nectar-laden flowers attract pretty butterflies like moths to a flame. This beautiful plant is native to America, so if you want to focus on plants that will attract or entice wildlife, this can be a good choice. Lantana is also generally resistant to deer—they don’t find it particularly attractive, even though you will. So plant a container or two of this wonderful, durable plant, then sit back and wait for your fluttering-winged visitors to arrive.
Here’s another great DIY tutorial that will help you create benches using your very own trees. This idea is not only handy, but it’s so easy to make and won’t cost you a thing if you have spare wood laying around. The more trees you have, the better with this great outdoor idea. The tree acts as a sort of base board or pillar for the actual bench, and all you have to do is built around the actual tree trunk to create some of the cutest benches ever! This is a great idea if you want to create outdoor seating without buying lawn furniture.
Take glorious fall color right up to your door by mixing the blazing tones of orange and yellow with cool shades of purple and blue. First, encircle a copper container with a bittersweet wreath (fresh or faux). To contrast with the orange berries, add ‘Lemon Ball’ sedum and the regal hues of purple cabbage. Spice up the center with ‘Calypso Orange’ ornamental peppers and ‘Cosmic Yellow’ cosmos. Crown the look with a halo of Mexican bush sage. Stack pumpkins on the steps for additional color. Provide full sun and moderate water and the display will flourish through the fall. When it's done, just plant the sedum in your yard to continue the show.
By carefully sculpting the landscape and choosing the right plants and materials, you can hide an unattractive driveway. With only a few steps, that less-than-picture perfect portion of your home can be transformed into a gardener’s paradise. Start by creating a slightly raised island of lawn in the center of the drive. Then, add a low boxwood hedge toward the back of the island with roses, annuals, and perennials rising above the hedge in the front. Blend a variety of colors, textures, and heights for a great look. Try 'Crystal Fairy' rose for height, lamb's ears for texture, and 'Butterfly Deep Rose' pentas for color.
Calibrachoa looks like a miniature petunia. Forming a trailing mound, it’s perfect for pots and hanging baskets. Be careful to ensure that your calibrachoas have good drainage, because they require it—so they are better in containers than they are in garden beds. You’ll love the names of your calibrachoas too: Million Bells, Mini Famous, Cabaret, Can-Can, and the positively powerful Superbells are just a few of your choices. So whether you want to ring a ton of bells, have a little fame, do a little dance, or see a show, these are the perfect solution for your container garden.
Utilizing crushed stone or garden rocks is one of the easiest cheap backyard landscaping ideas you can find. Instead of having to pay a hefty price for lawn turf such as grass or other plants, you can easily fill a lot of space by using the type of crushed stone pictured or even garden rocks, gravel, etc. There are so many garden fillers out here you can choose from and you can find virtually any color and texture that would work best with your setting. If you don’t want to fill the entire space up with gravel or rocks, you can easily outline a garden are to give it some decorative properties and spruce up the area.

Go-to grasses and can't-fail lantanas mark the advent of a bright new season. And the coming of fall doesn’t mean the end of container garden beauty. It simply means you have to pay new attention to what needs to be planted—and where. Consider moving your planters indoors; consider plants like fountain grass, which is sun-loving and forgiving; and add in some lantanas, or some sweet potato vines, for color, thrill, and excitement. Focus on your fall containers too. Use bright pops of color, particularly if you plan to bring your containers inside. Or, use a clean neutral, like black, or white, and let the flowers and foliage truly shine. 
Drainage problems can be a real drain on your time and energy. Solving drainage problems sounds easy, in theory: Find out where the excess water is coming from, then take the necessary steps to channel it away. Sometimes it's not easy and you will need to call a pro, but there are some DIY options, like installing French drains, building dry creek beds and ensuring the proper slope for the runoff. 
Try planting ground cover in a pot. 'Purple Pixie' loropetalum shrub combines showy pink flowers in spring with deep burgundy evergreen foliage and a pronounced weeping form. As a ground cover, it reaches 1 to 2 feet high and 4 to 5 feet wide. Placed in a container, a 1-gallon plant in a 24-inch-tall pot will completely hide the vessel in just a couple of years. This is a great way to give visual structure to your garden without having to make decisions regarding more formal architectural elements when you prefer to focus on softer, more natural forms.
DANDELIONS are a sign of alkaline soil. Refer to the pH stuff above. They can also indicate compacted or poor soil. The above methods will prevent dandelions from propogating. Since dandelions live about five years, the mature dandelions will struggle with the tall, thick turf and die off in two to three years. I now think that a few dandelions poking up once in a while are kinda nice and I leave them alone.
Based on the above, grass that grows on sandy soil must be watered more often than the same grass growing on clay or loam soils. Even after a thorough watering, sandy soils hold little plant-available moisture. They require more frequent irrigation with smaller amounts of water. Conversely, turf growing on a loamy-clay soil can be irrigated less frequently, with larger quantities of water. Watering less often means more efficient water use because of less loss to evaporation. It can also reduce the number of weeds that appear in the lawn.
To keep your flowers from being gobbled up by deer—one of the most heartbreaking of all garden misfortunes—choose flowers that people find glorious and deer find disgusting. It’s not as hard a chore as you might imagine. We recommend that you choose deer-averse perennials like butterfly weed, globe thistle, 'Royal Red' butterfly bush, or even purple cornflower. Deer won’t touch them, and, at the end of the day, you’ll still have a flowerbed full of gorgeous leaves and blooms. You can find any of these varieties at garden centers, but be sure that you plant them in well-drained soil.
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