This is a super cute idea for someone who wants to add some planters to an especially small space – like an apartment balcony or tiny side garden. I’m not sure what these tiny planters are exactly, but they look like tiny little buckets. Whatever they are, they’re adorable, and really you can use anything that can hold some dirt for a plant in it as a planter. Since these containers are especially small, make sure to use plants that can live in a smaller, more cramped space like tiny cactuses or vibrant succulents. This is a low maintenance way to bring some plants into the scene!
With the challenge of working around one of the largest oak trees in the appropriately named city of Oakville in Ontario, Canada, Partridge Fine Landscapes added curbed braces and sculpted ends to an organically shaped patio. The flagstone patio was set on a concrete base, with pavers individually cut to accommodate the curves. The pergola is made of Douglas fir. Lime-green hydrangeas soften the landscape.
Overfertilization can contribute to thatch buildup and increased mowing requirements. Avoid underfertilization of bluegrass and ryegrass. These species can become unhealthy if not fertilized properly. Turf that does not respond to nitrogen fertilizer may be lacking in other nutrients, such as phosphorus or iron. Get the soil tested to determine which nutrient(s) are deficient.
Although they may not be the first thing that come to mind, don’t ignore edibles when selecting your planting materials. Different varieties of lettuce have beautiful color and texture, and can add both visual interest and an unexpected kitchen surprise to your container garden. Here, several leafy edibles mix with violas and mums. These leafy greens will be a surprise to people who wonder what is creating the beautiful colors in your containers—and you’ll be just as surprised if you choose to let them be the centerpiece of something on your dinner plate.
This container is as sensual as it is beautiful, creating a multisensory sensation. It combines a burst of daffodils with bold hues and fragrant seasonal blooms for colorful containers that keep on giving. This trio combines floriferous 'Superbells Dreamsicle' calibrachoa, the delicately fragrant and easy-to-grow 'Snow Princess' sweet alyssum, and cool-weather 'Sunsatia Lemon' nemesia. Tonally, these bolt towards the warm end of the color spectrum, and are rich with deep oranges and yellows, tempered by touches of white throughout. Even separately, every one of these would be a visual delight. Together, the interplay of each with the other is intoxicating.
When it comes to paths and patios, gravel is a much more affordable surface than paving. To lay it in place; mark out the area, then scrape away loose soil or grass, pin down a permeable membrane to stop the weeds coming through and spread the gravel over it. Aim for a depth of 2.5cm. Choose a pale gravel, like Honey Stone, to contrast with your lawn and planting. A large bag will cover around 20 sq metres.
Along with crevices, most gardens have narrow strips that lack soil and moisture. Rather than fighting the conditions, work with them. One of the landscaping ideas you can implement is to plant some tough, vining groundcovers and let them sprawl over the area. Use ivy in shady areas, succulents in sunny spots. A mulch of gravel is a nice low-maintenance addition that keeps plant foliage clean.
Growing your own garlic is so simple! You will need a garden pot at least 8” deep. Mix potting soil and gardening sand at a 3/1 ratio. Fill your pot, leaving about 1″ of space at the top. All you need to begin growing garlic is a conventional garlic bulb, preferably organic. Take a clove with skin on and hold the pointy end up. Push the clove, pointy side up, about 1″ into the soil. Water enough to keep the soil moist (not soggy). If planting more than one clove, make sure to keep at least 4″ between each. Make sure you give your garlic plants direct sunlight at least 8 hours per day. Your garlic will begin to sprout green sprouts from the top. You will know when it is time to harvest when the sprouts begin to turn yellow-brown about 2/3 the way down. Don’t pull the garlic out by the sprouts—make sure you use a small shovel. Once you harvest your garlic, let it dry for about a week. Store your garlic in a cool dry place.
Replacing lawn with a ground cover of rocks or large boulder accents cuts down on upkeep and the need for irrigation. In addition to adding a rugged look to your backyard, sand- or stone-based ground cover can double as a weed suppressor and foundation for stepping stones. Moreover, choose low-maintenance plants, like sedum or succulents, to plant in the rock garden for beautiful contrast.

This entry path feel more like a nature trail than a garden walk. Thyme grows between steps; boulders, cactus, and rosemary fringe the path's edges. Even before guests get to the house, wide steps (made of concrete aggregate) encourage them to slow down and enjoy the garden. If your yard doesn't have enough sun for thyme, tuck Corsican mint or Japanese sweet flag between your steps or pavers; both have scented foliage. Stagger your pavers to slow the journey.


42. Nothing beats the backyard privacy of your own fence. Before you begin the building process, you'll need to be sure of a few things: Verify your property line, check with your city or township about the limitations and height-restrictions of your fence, have someone from the city come and check for gas lines, and have a neighborly chat with anyone you'll be sharing the fence line with.

You don’t want a one-dimensional home, so why would you want one-dimensional landscape design? Add lovely, eye-catching layers to your yard with elevated planters and hanging baskets. This strategy creates visual interest with minimal effort. Adding elevated planters and hanging baskets also creates a sea of beautiful color from high to low, and the visual effect gives the impression of waves of blossoms rising and falling all across your yard. If you want to create an immersive escape, this is a foolproof way to get started. As an added bonus, plants love the good drainage and aeration that raised planters provide.
Crushed brick or gravel is a beautiful and low-maintenance paving option for small gardens. It's also easier to use and less expensive than brick or flagstone. Just be sure to spread a layer of landscape fabric underneath the gravel to keep weeds from popping through. On this California hillside, the gravel also allows rainfall to percolate through to the soil instead of running off down the hillside.
Let grass clippings fall back onto the lawn, unless they are used for composting or mulching elsewhere in the landscape. Grass clippings decompose quickly and provide a source of recycled nutrients and organic matter for the lawn. Mulching mowers can do this easily. Side-discharge rotary mowers also distribute clippings effectively if the lawn is mowed at the proper frequency.
You can easily transform a basic backyard shed into a gorgeous space—complete with a barn quilt—in just 48 hours. Start by hanging checkered fabric by installing a rope across the peak of the shed and draping the fabric over using a staple gun to attach fabric to the walls (this shed required about 30 yard of fabric). Then hang an upholstered blue couch to create a unique seating area. And finish the shed by accessorizing with a bar cart, rug, and decorative baskets and plants.

Assuming you are in the right zone for this type of planting, if you don't want to spend all of your time watering, stick with easy-care options in some of your containers. Succulents and bougainvilleas need little care in containers. You can choose succulents that will grow to create senses of scale and drama, such as agave, or aloe. Depending on your choice of succulent, some of these may grow as tall as ten feet high, so be are of their potential when planning your container garden. Then, prepare for a beautiful sight.
If you are tempted to let your container garden run just a little wild, then plantings like these may help create that perfect sense of cultured mess that you’re after. Just plan to let your plants spill out of their container. A generous planting of golden variegated sweet flag (Acorus gramineus ‘Ogon’) fills this kettle, with golden creeping Jenny (Lysimachia nummularia ‘Aurea’) trailing out and onto the gravel below. One, contained, lifts the eyes, while the other gently creates a delicate, soft carpet of green that creeps towards a comfortable seating area. This is for when the garden is not totally wild, but it is just wild enough.
By the end of winter, people are ready for spring. March weather is unpredictable—although the weather in April can in fact be crueler—so for those cool days, try the prolific pink blooms of 'Strawberry Sundae' twinspurs (Diascia hybrid). Twinspur loves this weather so much it actually goes dormant in the heat of summer. Hardy violas, and kale, will contribute to making spring seem like it has definitely sprung, as each of these plants will work together to maintain their shape and color. They will keep looking great even when temperatures fluctuate.
This is my first year having a true garden, and so far I’m loving the time I get outside playing in the dirt and absorbing the sunshine. It’s certainly a nice break from my computer! As a beginner, I’m learning a lot of things that will make next year’s garden easier, and hopefully a little healthier, too. I don’t want to win the prize for the largest squash (not there yet), but I do want enough juicy tomatoes to last all summer long.
Replacing lawn with a ground cover of rocks or large boulder accents cuts down on upkeep and the need for irrigation. In addition to adding a rugged look to your backyard, sand- or stone-based ground cover can double as a weed suppressor and foundation for stepping stones. Moreover, choose low-maintenance plants, like sedum or succulents, to plant in the rock garden for beautiful contrast.

Drainage problems can be a real drain on your time and energy. Solving drainage problems sounds easy, in theory: Find out where the excess water is coming from, then take the necessary steps to channel it away. Sometimes it's not easy and you will need to call a pro, but there are some DIY options, like installing French drains, building dry creek beds and ensuring the proper slope for the runoff. 
Here it comes—a beautiful container in the sun, that is. This high-drama, low-maintenance container spotlights 'Variegated Spreading Salmon' SunPatiens, but leaves room for a foxtail asparagus fern and a 6-inch pot of 'Neon' pothos. Everything is set in a glazed-ceramic container, its bright green finish complementing the natural colors of the plantings. This is a beautiful example of the keeping it simple container-garden aesthetic. Let the SunPatiens—a strain that resulted from a cross between a New Guinea hybrids and a wild species—be the bright, central focus of this arrangement. Then, let everything else simply help them shine.  
But we don’t stop there. As one of the area’s premier lawn care companies, we can also provide extended services to care for your whole landscape. For instance, our crew of yard service professionals can keep your landscape looking immaculate with our mowing, edging, trimming, and related services. Our tree and shrub care experts can keep your ornamental foliage looking beautiful and healthy. We even have a landscape design/build team, including licensed landscape architects, which can work with you from start to finish to create a beautiful outdoor retreat, complete with elements such as terraced gardens, comfortable sitting areas, a charming stone pathway, or any other idea you can envision.
Hm. I think there’s a failure in communication here. Frugal Bachelor, I am very sympathetic to the plight of immigrants — legal or otherwise — and agree that, as you said, “they are the shit, they are bad asses who work very hard, and can earn a buck anywhere they go, they are role models for all of us aspiring to be frugal, to save money, and to get rich slowly.”
One of the challenges with container gardening can be retaining visual beauty through changing seasons. This thoughtful approach puts that problem to rest. The solution is to think of every container as having a 'keeper'—a durable plant that continues from season to season—with a plant that may require more attention. For this beautiful pair of urns we’ve partnered colorful annuals with an evergreen for an established planting that can still change from season to season. With ivy spilling over the sides, and 'Pandora’s Box' violas providing bold tones, these planters are pure excitement. In general, violas are more tolerant of temperature variation than the botanically similar pansies.
Using a color palette based on the tones of a tree in the center of the garden, O Plus L blended the interior with the exterior of this California Modernist home in Pacific Palisades known as the Ravoli Estate. This was achieved by using the same surface and flooring materials inside and out and echoing the home's horizontal lines in the backyard.  

In order to retain the easy upkeep of your garden, you will want to choose low maintenance landscaping plants. These types of plants can grow and prosper with little water and do not require trimming and other care. Some easy large or small yard ideas include planting bushes such as the plumbago ariculata or leocophyllum frutescens. These bushes are water conserving plants that do not require irrigation or frequent watering.
When we talk about a rough-and-tumble, resilient plant, this is what we’re thinking of. Crinums laugh at drought, don't need fertilizer, and welcome hot, humid summers with lily-like flowers that perfume the air. Because they grow into huge bulbs over time, they're practically indestructible. If you need a low-maintenance, high-impact flower, this low-fuss lily will be your go-to plant. They come in an array of rainbow hues, ensuring that your yard will be adorned in your favorite vibrant colors. These plants like sun and don’t care much about the sort of soil in which you plant them. We wish more plants were this low-maintenance.
×