You don’t want a one-dimensional home, so why would you want one-dimensional landscape design? Add lovely, eye-catching layers to your yard with elevated planters and hanging baskets. This strategy creates visual interest with minimal effort. Adding elevated planters and hanging baskets also creates a sea of beautiful color from high to low, and the visual effect gives the impression of waves of blossoms rising and falling all across your yard. If you want to create an immersive escape, this is a foolproof way to get started. As an added bonus, plants love the good drainage and aeration that raised planters provide.
Gravel’s earthy texture, its give underfoot, and its crunchy sound are the reasons why this oldest of hardscapes will always be perceived as the softest of paving materials. This gravel entry is a clean casual foil for plant textures and colors. Japanese silver grass billows over the basalt wall at right beside climbing hydrangea. ‘Maori Sunrise’ New Zealand flax in a container punctuates the small pond in the middle while ‘Palace Purple’ heuchera mugho pine and gunnera fill a bed near the house. Cotoneaster spills onto gravel.

Terraced stone steps in a mix-and-match pattern creates a strong focal point, while "character" plants create visual interest on both sides of the path. Rusty-hued Carex testacea softens the front path, while green kniphofia, plum Heuchera ‘Obsidian’, Libertia peregrinans ‘Bronze Sword’, and euphorbia surround the ‘Karl Foerster’ grass. Across the path, drifts of Picea sitchensis ‘Papoose’, variegated iris, and Phormium ‘Dusky Chief’ encircle a ginkgo tree.
Nobody likes lawn mowing or weed eating (well, we do). With Lawn Care Plus, there is no reason to not have a professionally managed lawn and sprinkler system. We have been serving Northern Colorado since 1994, providing expertise and assistance, professional maintenance, and well managed landscapes and sprinkler systems. We are efficient, fast and leave a great looking yard. Oh, and we are right within your budget with programs tailored for your individual care needs.

This is a super cute idea for someone who wants to add some planters to an especially small space – like an apartment balcony or tiny side garden. I’m not sure what these tiny planters are exactly, but they look like tiny little buckets. Whatever they are, they’re adorable, and really you can use anything that can hold some dirt for a plant in it as a planter. Since these containers are especially small, make sure to use plants that can live in a smaller, more cramped space like tiny cactuses or vibrant succulents. This is a low maintenance way to bring some plants into the scene!

There are three classes of caladiums—fancy leaf, strap leaf, and dwarf—and all three will work in containers. Once they are established, and their basic needs for water and fertilizer are met, they should thrive. The colorful foliage of caladiums has tons of drama. Pots containing three different caladiums add color and variety to this entry in summer. From left to right: ‘June Bride,’ ‘Pink Gem,’ and ‘Aaron’. You can probably find a wide range of caladiums at your local garden center, but if you need to find a wider selection than what may be locally available, caladiums are also available online. 
Although it is sometimes confused with the completed unrelated plant the Bougainvillea, mandevilla is a beautiful, bright flowering and climbing vine found throughout the South. Mandevillas can thrive in containers—as with the one pictured, which twines its way through the railing on a rooftop deck. Reveling in hot weather given its tropical origins, mandevilla can grow more than 10 feet a year, and will bloom continuously from spring until the first frost. And, although in the tropical and coastal South they may weather the winter outdoors, if you plant them in containers you may even bring them inside for the cold season.
These porch-step containers begin with bright pink and yellow zinnias—think 'Zowie! Yellow Flame' or 'Magellan Salmon'—which are one of our favorite flowers for their beautiful, round shape. Cooler 'filler' flowers, such as purple verbenas and blue calibrachoas are added to create contrast with texture and color. To make this container garden even simpler, opt for inexpensive plastic planters that are weatherproof and easy to move around. Grouping your containers in a tight space can help to create a homey, mini-garden vibe. Plus, when placed side by side, all of these incredible colors intensify. You’ll love to walk up to these bright wonders.

One of the beauties of container gardening is the ability to create visual variety. Containers are the perfect canvas for unique approaches to color, texture, and composition.  These showy snapdragons, in a cacophony of bold colors, add height to your containers. They pair well with a mixture of flowers that will act as your fillers and spillers, including Penny violas, tulips, parsley, and ivy. Each of these has its own wonder and surprise, rich with color, tone, and texture. This container garden feels incredibly expansive without taking up a great deal of space, so it works well in any number of locations.


Combine several English ivy topiaries and a clipped lemon cypress to accent a garden table. You’ll be able to sit down, yet feel as if you are strolling through a classic parterre garden. Mix spirals, globes, columns, and lollipop shapes of varying heights—you’ll love how simple it is to help these topiaries maintain their beautiful shapes. Unify the look by planting everything in terra-cotta pots. We love the flared sides of these clean and simple pots by Campo de' Fiori (campodefiori.com). The topiaries are by Schubert Nursery (schubertnursery.com), and should be readily available at your local garden center.
Sometimes a single container can be all it takes to transform an outdoor space from dull to divine. This container, filled with 'Baby Tut' dwarf papyrus, elephant's ear, 'Blackie' sweet potato vine, and 'Vogue Audrey' mandevilla, is the ideal focal point or space filler in an area that receives full to partial sun. Any variety of these plants will work wonderfully well together: Just focus on color, texture, and shape to create a great arrangement in your preferred container. They will all do well together, and their beauty will beat the heat.

Around your outdoor living space, add beds of mulch instead of grass. "It's one of the best investments you can have in your yard because mulch breaks down, fertilizes your plants, and prevents weeds," says Chris. "It's low-maintenance because you don't have to mow it or water it. It's also inexpensive and you only have to replace it in the spring." An added perk: Mulch also provides a pleasant aroma for your yard.
Perennials are an excellent way to “divide and conquer” your landscape. Any time you plant a perennial, you can count on it to grow in size for several years. Instead of buying new flowers each year, simply uproot and move new blooms that germinated from last year’s perennials. You can turn a $10 perennial into $40 worth of savings if you divide its blooms and replant them in four different portions of your garden each year.
Have you thought about revamping your front yard but don’t want to break the bank? There are so many great ideas out there that don’t cost much money at all! Whether it’s a patio area that needs a little fixer upper or a whole outdoor concept you’d like to start, so much can be done with a little ingenuity and inventiveness. We’ve compiled a list of cheap landscaping ideas that will not only be fun to start, but will also look absolutely amazing! Get the whole family in on the fun to create a gorgeous space everyone can appreciate! Keep reading for some great front yard landscaping ideas on a budget!

Very informative article I’m sure that many do-it-yourselfers have gained alot of knowledge from visiting your site. I like that you’ve mentioned about the soil testing that you can have done or do yourself, I’ve found that to be extremely helpful with my lawn care clients that I service. AffordaLawn is the name of my Lawn Service, we service customers in both Missouri and Kansas and doing a soil test along with the first service for new clients have made us alot of happy customers later in the year. Many tell us they’ve never seen their lawns look so good. Kinda makes it easy though when you know what their lawns in need of.

Purple fountain grass looks great in containers. Its vertical shape creates an exclamation point in the border. Then, its purplish-red leaves and fall plumes combine well with the red coleus below. This grass and the coleus are not winter hardy in most areas, but new plants bought in spring are inexpensive and grow quickly, so you can enjoy this pairing from early spring until late in the fall. You’ll have its beautiful memories to get you through any harsh winters, and the anticipation of it growing again will have you excited to be back in your garden at the first opportunity in the spring.
Great job! It is important that you do your research or consult a professional at a nursery or lawn and garden center when choosing plants. It is necessary that you select plants suitable to the sunlight and soil conditions your yard offers. You cannot expect a beautiful flower to remain healthy in a shady spot in your yard if it requires full sun. Matching the soil conditions of your lot to the plants you select is a main key to beautiful landscaping.
Also, the Better Homes & Gardens website offers many free plans, and you don’t have to subscribe to the magazine. I was able to tailor one of their plans to my yard with amazing results. Even better, I was able to re-use some of the materials already in my yard (bluestone walk I found buried under grass, re-set them in a new walk; was able to capitalize on shrubs which were hardy enough to be moved). Total cost was just $200, plus the labor I put in myself.

42. Nothing beats the backyard privacy of your own fence. Before you begin the building process, you'll need to be sure of a few things: Verify your property line, check with your city or township about the limitations and height-restrictions of your fence, have someone from the city come and check for gas lines, and have a neighborly chat with anyone you'll be sharing the fence line with.
Sometimes a single container can be all it takes to transform an outdoor space from dull to divine. This container, filled with 'Baby Tut' dwarf papyrus, elephant's ear, 'Blackie' sweet potato vine, and 'Vogue Audrey' mandevilla, is the ideal focal point or space filler in an area that receives full to partial sun. Any variety of these plants will work wonderfully well together: Just focus on color, texture, and shape to create a great arrangement in your preferred container. They will all do well together, and their beauty will beat the heat.
Customize your garden with stackable garden planters! You can grow 16 plants or more in small vertical space with this clever stackable planter. The tiers are self-watering; simply water the top tier and let the water flow down to the bottom layer in one simple step. Stacked on top of one another, they’ll create a beautiful natural arrangement. When you’re not using them, you can easily store them away.
The historical term for a classically designed French garden is a 'parterre garden.' Some of its most famous examples are actually in England, including the fabulous—and recently recreated—geometric garden at Hanbury Hall. This container garden, with its formal structure and arrangement, takes both its inspiration and its design from the parterre garden design concept—but the container gardening part of the process is still incredibly simple. Regardless of your overall garden design plan, you can add some height to the center of any flowerbed by placing a very vertical potted plant in its middle. Here, a potted rosemary topiary rises above the other edibles in this bed. What is so sensational about this approach is that it uses a traditional language, but with new, timesaving gardening innovations.

Backyard Boss is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com. To support our work we earn a commission if you purchase through some of the links listed above at no additional cost to you. This does not influence our opinions, but we believe in transparency so you can make informed choices. Read more here.
Let grass clippings fall back onto the lawn, unless they are used for composting or mulching elsewhere in the landscape. Grass clippings decompose quickly and provide a source of recycled nutrients and organic matter for the lawn. Mulching mowers can do this easily. Side-discharge rotary mowers also distribute clippings effectively if the lawn is mowed at the proper frequency.
Before planting a lawn, decide on the desired quality, how the lawn will be used, and how much time and money you are willing to invest. Have your soil tested. Contact your Colorado State University Extension county office for information on soil testing. Soil amendments can easily be added before planting. High quality sod or seed also helps ensure a satisfactory lawn.
The moment when flowers burst forth with their vibrant blooms is one of the most exciting times for gardeners…or anyone with a yard, or anyone passing by said yard. A great thing about gardening in the South is that we get treated to colorful flowers, leaves, or berries in every season. We cultivate plants that love our hot summers, our mild winters, and that look great all year. They are fantastic additions to our flowerbeds, and we love the accent that they offer to our front porches, our mailboxes, our flowerbeds, and our backyards. Look for these plants each season:
×