Although they may not be the first thing that come to mind, don’t ignore edibles when selecting your planting materials. Different varieties of lettuce have beautiful color and texture, and can add both visual interest and an unexpected kitchen surprise to your container garden. Here, several leafy edibles mix with violas and mums. These leafy greens will be a surprise to people who wonder what is creating the beautiful colors in your containers—and you’ll be just as surprised if you choose to let them be the centerpiece of something on your dinner plate.
Many factors influence lawn water requirements, and no two lawns are exactly alike. A healthy, high-quality bluegrass or ryegrass lawn may need up to 2.25 inches of water per week under hot, dry, windy summer conditions. It may require much less when the weather is cool or cloudy. Turf-type tall fescue may perform well with less water than a bluegrass lawn, if it can grow a deep root system. In many cases, however, tall fescue requires as much water as bluegrass to look good. Buffalograss and blue grama lawns can remain green for weeks without watering, even during the hottest summer weather.
Using white to lighten your garden is a great way to let the tone of plants themselves be the neutral foundation for the design you build upon. Here several large pots of white impatiens filled to bursting brighten this shady corner with hundreds of blooms. Apart from being filled with one type of plant, these white impatiens are planted in a single style of container—this can help to tie your outdoor space together. If you are planning on planting several different container garden features, consider choosing separate planters for each, or choose a single planter to create a sense of harmony.
Strawberries can be grown in a window box, a pot, or on a balcony. They don’t need more than 12″ soil depth but do need to get at least 6 hours of direct sunlight. Make sure to water them enough to keep the soil moist but not wet. Harvesting strawberries is a little like a treasure hunt, with many at leaf-level but much more hiding down by the soil line. Don’t overlook any!
The historical term for a classically designed French garden is a 'parterre garden.' Some of its most famous examples are actually in England, including the fabulous—and recently recreated—geometric garden at Hanbury Hall. This container garden, with its formal structure and arrangement, takes both its inspiration and its design from the parterre garden design concept—but the container gardening part of the process is still incredibly simple. Regardless of your overall garden design plan, you can add some height to the center of any flowerbed by placing a very vertical potted plant in its middle. Here, a potted rosemary topiary rises above the other edibles in this bed. What is so sensational about this approach is that it uses a traditional language, but with new, timesaving gardening innovations.
The above lawn care advice will eliminate 95% to 99% of your weed problem. But there are some weeds that are almost impossible to get rid of, no matter what. Some of these are even resistant to the chemical army. The two to be careful of in my area are BINDWEED (looks like white or pink morning glory) and CANADIAN THISTLE. These two have HUGE root systems that might go as deep as thirty feet into the soil. They spread with rhizomes, just like your grass. The above techniques will discourage them enough to go to your neigbor's instead. They don't like tall grass or mowing. They might try to pop up on fences or other lawn borders. Fifty outcroppings could all be part of the same plant, so you really have to get as much of them as you can. The key is to remove the green plant that provides it with sugar. It needs sun and sugar to support that massive root system. Repeated digging will weaken it to the point that bugs and bacteria can take over.
Set a Time Budget and Stick to it Much like dollars count, your time counts, too, when it comes to do it yourself landscaping. "You have to think about when you'll get to things," says Miller. "You have to realistically look at when you can get things done and if you want to eat up every nice-weather weekend. Don't overcommit and wind up disappointed."
Build a border: Landscape timbers, railroad ties and short retaining walls for flower beds or raised bed gardening are easy do it yourself landscaping projects that have long-lasting impact. Draw up a simple landscape design plan for the area you plan to border and make a list of materials you’ll need – the border itself, fill dirt/topsoil, plant life and tools. Building borders make take a little elbow grease, but your creation will be worth years of enjoyment!
This is a super cute idea for someone who wants to add some planters to an especially small space – like an apartment balcony or tiny side garden. I’m not sure what these tiny planters are exactly, but they look like tiny little buckets. Whatever they are, they’re adorable, and really you can use anything that can hold some dirt for a plant in it as a planter. Since these containers are especially small, make sure to use plants that can live in a smaller, more cramped space like tiny cactuses or vibrant succulents. This is a low maintenance way to bring some plants into the scene!

Landscaping projects suitable for DIY homeowners range from very simple projects anyone can tackle to sophisticated, complex projects that take substantial work and resources. Homeowners seeking a helping hand can follow the instructions in the resource links below, which feature many of the most popular DIY landscaping projects. Because safety should always be of paramount concern, especially when working with power equipment, make sure to refer to the article on Home Safety Tips in the section on Outdoor Living.
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It’s not all about flowers, though. Incorporating architectural elements and pathways into a landscape design is a good way—one that’s often overlooked but always welcome—to add big impact in a yard or garden. Paths and walkways can direct visitors through the space and can also allow you to more easily enjoy the fruits of your DIY landscaping efforts.
Every year in summer, the edge that the lawn runs along the concrete gets burned. I have replaced, reseeded, fertilized and put extra water, but it didn’t help. Should I put the flat rubber edging or should I put the vertical edging to stop the heat from the concrete from burning the lawn? Southern Oregon and 2300 ft. above sea level shouldn’t be this difficult.
Sometimes a single container can be all it takes to transform an outdoor space from dull to divine. This container, filled with 'Baby Tut' dwarf papyrus, elephant's ear, 'Blackie' sweet potato vine, and 'Vogue Audrey' mandevilla, is the ideal focal point or space filler in an area that receives full to partial sun. Any variety of these plants will work wonderfully well together: Just focus on color, texture, and shape to create a great arrangement in your preferred container. They will all do well together, and their beauty will beat the heat.
This is my first year having a true garden, and so far I’m loving the time I get outside playing in the dirt and absorbing the sunshine. It’s certainly a nice break from my computer! As a beginner, I’m learning a lot of things that will make next year’s garden easier, and hopefully a little healthier, too. I don’t want to win the prize for the largest squash (not there yet), but I do want enough juicy tomatoes to last all summer long.
When we talk about a rough-and-tumble, resilient plant, this is what we’re thinking of. Crinums laugh at drought, don't need fertilizer, and welcome hot, humid summers with lily-like flowers that perfume the air. Because they grow into huge bulbs over time, they're practically indestructible. If you need a low-maintenance, high-impact flower, this low-fuss lily will be your go-to plant. They come in an array of rainbow hues, ensuring that your yard will be adorned in your favorite vibrant colors. These plants like sun and don’t care much about the sort of soil in which you plant them. We wish more plants were this low-maintenance.
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