Dog poop and dog pee are both high in nitrogen. But if you give your lawn too much nitrogen, you'll kill it. Not the whole lawn. Just the spot with too much nitrogen. Usually there will be a load of dog poop and the grass under it will be dead. And the grass immediately around it will be greener, taller, thicker and healthier than all the rest of the lawn. So the stuff immediately under the crap is "too much" and the stuff surrounding the crap is "optimal". Same thing for pee only there won't be a pile of poop in the middle.
Landscaping projects suitable for DIY homeowners range from very simple projects anyone can tackle to sophisticated, complex projects that take substantial work and resources. Homeowners seeking a helping hand can follow the instructions in the resource links below, which feature many of the most popular DIY landscaping projects. Because safety should always be of paramount concern, especially when working with power equipment, make sure to refer to the article on Home Safety Tips in the section on Outdoor Living.

Daffodils are container-friendly options for spring plantings, and they are quite literally they are some of the most-prized bulbs in the South. They naturally increase from year to year, so they can fill a container naturally. They also require minimal care. But most of all, they’re simply gorgeous—they’re available in colors including white, salmon, pink, orange, apricot, and red. Pair them with other spring bloomers with similar condition requirements such as grape hyacinth. The grape hyacinth will grow to between six inches and a foot tall, leaving the daffodils to soar above.


Having fresh herbs at home can be much simpler than making a trip to the store. Transplants of cilantro, parsley, and chives are at their best in late winter months, both in containers and in the ground. Plant them in a shallow box, as pictured, and use them as an outdoor centerpiece. They will grow wonderfully well together, and you’ll have as much or as little as you need on-hand for topping a wide range of delectable dishes fresh from oven to table. Label your herbs to be sure which is which, then grab a handful whenever you need one. These raised-bed container gardens should produce plenty to share with family, friends, and neighbors.
*$29.95 First Application: Requires purchase of annual plan. Special price of $29.95 is for first application only, for new residential EasyPay or PrePay customers only, and applies to lawns up to 5,000 square feet. For lawns more than 5,000 square feet or for the regular lawn application price for a lawn of any size, please call for estimate. Valid at participating TruGreen locations. Availability of services may vary by geography. Not to be combined with or used in conjunction with any other offer or discount. Additional restrictions may apply. Consumer responsible for all sales tax.
Spaced-out pavers or stepping stones offer an affordable alternative to hardscape. The shape, material, and arrangement of the pavers will also help define the character of your backyard, whether you're going for a more playful or structured feel. To ensure long-term low maintenance, choose pavers made from sturdier, non-porous materials; set them on a sturdy foundation such as compacted sand to protect against sinking; and install pavers level to the land for easier mowing.
You’ll be phobia-free about welcoming these spiders into your home—spider plants, that is. For this flowing composition that can create color throughout your garden, Red ‘Freida Hemple’ caladiums, a spider plant, and a ‘Little Gem’ Southern magnolia decorate a large pot in the corner. This helps hide a downspout, and fills the space with bright beauty. Working with the idea that repetition creates rhythm, and that builds to a harmonious container garden, smaller pots of the same caladiums tie the grouping together. The boldness of the plants is contrasted with the simple, neutral containers. Think of using natural tones in stone and off-white for these outdoor container compositions.

★★ Requires purchase of full mosquito plan. Special price of $39.95 is for first mosquito application only, for new EasyPay or PrePay residential customers only, and applies to properties up to 1 acre. For properties more than 1 acre, please call for estimate. Valid at participating TruGreen locations. Availability of services may vary by geography. Not to be combined with or used in conjunction with any other offer or discount. Additional restrictions may apply. Consumer responsible for all sales tax. ✧ Guarantee applies to full plan customers only.
It can be salad days every day if you plan your container garden carefully. Plant colorful red and green Wildfire mix lettuces in a sunny spot near the kitchen, and you will be mixing up everything from a classic Caesar to a Nicoise to everything in between. These containers will make it easy to prepare salads with your fresh harvest. Pair this with other leafy edibles, and you can have a container garden filled with freshness right in your own back yard. This is an easy way to eat locally—you can’t get much more local than your own home, and it is hard to beat the freshness of hand-picked. Enjoy!
The most efficient time of day to water is late evening and early morning (between 10 p.m. and midnight or 8 and 9 a.m.). It generally is less windy, cooler and more humid at this time, resulting in less evaporation and more efficient use of water. Water pressure is generally better and this results in optimal distribution patterns. Contrary to popular belief, watering at night does not encourage disease development.
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Incorporating pots into landscaping not only makes a yard more low-maintenance, but also more versatile. "We love to use pots, especially for clients who want color in different parts of the yard," says Peyton. "Plus, pots are easy to move around. If you're having a party on your patio, you can move them to that area." For an added pop of color, coordinate the flowers to the season — try whites and pinks in the spring and summer, and switch to yellows and reds in the fall.
Using stone or concrete slabs like the ones depicted are great when creating outdoor paths. Stone or concrete slabs shouldn’t cost you that much to purchase, but if you have a larger outdoor landscaped area, odds are you might already have some extras on hand. If not, you can easily find materials to create walking paths throughout your outdoor space at garden centers or home improvement stores. You may even have some friends or relatives that are getting rid of older garden materials. You can use virtually anything when it comes to constructing garden paths.

This sturdy galvanized-metal washtub—a flea market gem—is filled to an overflowing beauty with a hearty mix of lantanas and impatiens. Arranged with maroon Joseph’s coat, green coleus, and yellow creeping Jenny, this dense container was designed to highlight a back porch, or greet guests with its sense of joy and happiness on the front porch just as easily. Coleus varieties were first introduced into Europe in the 1700s, and their popularity remains high today. Given their tropical history, they are not particularly cold hardy, so don’t plan to make them a part of this container too early in the spring.
An outdoor room, like the space created under a pergola, can be a welcoming place to mix your containers. This grouping has a lush, vibrant assortment of planters and hanging pots. Combine complimentary colors and plantings to ensure you will have the feeling of a unified, welcoming space that you can settle into on a warm, sun-filled summer afternoon. Hardscaping defines a space for seating under the pergola, which well-placed containers will soften and enhance. Then, sit back and listen to the sweet chirp of birds, watch the butterflies on wing, and enjoy the fragrances from your beautiful container garden.
It's easy to create a hodgepodge look when planting if you try to plant one of everything. Avoid that with this gardening idea: Reusing the same colors, shapes, or plant varieties in plantings. Here's a perfect example: To the left of the deck, golden creeping Jenny (Lysimachia nummularia 'Aurea') echoes the color of golden sweet flag (Acorus gramineus 'Ogon'). The sweet flag augments the texture of the blue fescue (Festuca 'Elijah Blue'), which plays off the silvery-blue color of a potted false cypress (Chamaecyparis pisifera 'Baby Blue'). The shape of the false cypress, in turn, is a repeat of the Japanese maple next to the deck.
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