Hi Cathy! I myself was having same problem as you are. Just bought my home in February and when spring came I noticed my lawn was brown and dead in places but it is improving as green sprouts are coming in. To answer your question have a soil test done. I did and it showed me what my soil lacked and what fertilizer i needed to apply. You can find out your self if your grass is diseased by insects by grabbing your grass near the soil if it pulls out with no problem this is an indication of insect disease to your grass. You can get a soil test kit at lowes or home depot. it will let you know what your soil needs to green up your lawn. Some people just by any fertilizer but you need to be careful if you dont know what your lawn soil is lacking you could burn your lawn with applying the wrong fertilizer.
A superior backyard makes for superior living, period. It is a reminder that you needn’t invest large sums of money and time to fly to the far ends of the earth for a little R&R, but need only step outside. The best backyards combine all the simplicity of time-honored joys with the eye-appeal of modern design. No more mismatched lawn chairs and unsightly patches of neglected turf; it’s time to take your backyard to the next level. And with warmer seasons just a month away, now is your moment to seize these cool backyard ideas and unique possibilities.
Im a student at Reading Memorial High School and I am taking an Entrepreneurship class. For our final project we have to interview an owner of a company and get know how they keep there comapany succesful. I was hoping I could ask you questions about you and your company. It would be greatly appreciated if you respond within the next for days. Thank you for your time
Here's a can't-miss tip for beautifying your yard: make sure you're providing something of interest in each of the four seasons. Do-it-yourself landscaping for 4-season interest begins with a well-researched plant-selection plan. The goal is to have flowering trees and/or shrubs throughout spring and summer, fall foliage in autumn and good structure in winter. This article describes how to achieve that goal.
As mentioned previously, using natural elements such as wood and stone are great ways to make an outdoor space feel more close to nature. Since you’d be utilizing elements you’d typically find in nature anyways, these are usually cheaper items you can easily incorporate to any outdoor area. These wooden stumps in the picture make great outdoor patio tables or even side tables, depending on your preference. You could easily find stumps like these in wooded areas or in neighborhoods with a lot of trees if you don’t have them on hand already.

This is my first year having a true garden, and so far I’m loving the time I get outside playing in the dirt and absorbing the sunshine. It’s certainly a nice break from my computer! As a beginner, I’m learning a lot of things that will make next year’s garden easier, and hopefully a little healthier, too. I don’t want to win the prize for the largest squash (not there yet), but I do want enough juicy tomatoes to last all summer long.


Customize your garden with stackable garden planters! You can grow 16 plants or more in small vertical space with this clever stackable planter. The tiers are self-watering; simply water the top tier and let the water flow down to the bottom layer in one simple step. Stacked on top of one another, they’ll create a beautiful natural arrangement. When you’re not using them, you can easily store them away.
Wooden pallets can easily be turned into super great compost bins! Instead of trying to create some sort of landscape design or layout, compost bins may be the best use of the land for the garden centric person. Wooden pallets can also be made into garden boxes, so really, having wooden pallets on-hand for any gardener would be the best situation. This just goes to show how versatile wooden pallets are and how handy they are when it comes to gardening.
Yes, you read that right. This does say collard greens, and they really are one of our picks for a fantastic container garden. Easy and versatile, collards have graced Southern gardens and tables for generations. A cousin to kale and cabbage, these nutritious, leafy greens thrive in the cooler weather of fall and early spring. Durable, versatile, and beautiful, they are also incredibly enticing visually, and imbued with a range of tonal variation. They work well in differently sized containers. This galvanized-metal tub is filled with collards, creating an intimate container garden. Use them in situations where you would like simplicity to come to the fore.
As you saw earlier, a small lawn can be helpful to a small-space garden because it opens up the area and makes it feel less claustrophobic. Well, if you’re not going to be walking on the lawn all the time, you might consider substituting a groundcover. You not only avoid mowing, you also integrate the area into the landscape. With a groundcover, your lawn becomes the garden.
Our eyes are attracted to color and many gardeners stop there. But it's easier than you think to add a layer of interest to your garden by incorporating texture. This landscaping idea features tidy mounds of blue fescue, punctuated by an upright pyramid of Colorado blue spruce and dwarf black pine. A potted variegated yucca repeats the texture of the grass and adds in a new color.
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