Forgiving succulents are both heat and drought tolerant, so they'll look great all summer long. There are many novel ways to plant succulent containers, particularly since they are so resilient. Terra cotta pots work particularly well since they transfer moisture well and help succulents retain water. They also share a desert color palette with succulents, making the two appear as if they were always intended to go together. You may group a variety of succulents together, or create a container for your garden filled with a single type. Whatever your choice, water carefully and selectively, and these resilient plants will reward you with a beautiful container garden.
Using evergreen plants in a container means that you will always have a base that will look good for years. Once this element of your container is established, you can fill in with beautiful plants that may need more attention, but that will be easy. Choose something like a cast-iron plant, and then add in some caladiums, some impatiens, and even a creeping fig. This will give you the classics to thrill, fill, and spill. Any shade-loving combination that works well in a container can add color to an entry. If you need more structure, or balance, simply create an additional container of the same size and materials, or do a smaller one as a complement.
Plant trees for a good cause, and you can quickly transform your yard into a shaded paradise. By joining the Arbor Day Foundation for just $10 – or more, if you’re able – you will automatically qualify for 10 free trees. You can pick any trees you want for your yard, including oaks, flowering trees, and other beautiful varieties that are hand-selected for your region.
Before my master gardener training I thought that herbicide use had a time and place. The training covered not only the time and place, but also covered the details of toxicity. 2-4D is considered one of the safest herbicides. A quantity of 2-4D that would be about the same as a roll of life savers rubbed on the skin of four kindergarten children would kill two of them. This is not getting it in their mouth, but just rubbed on their skin. My reading on this subject has exposed far too many nightmares than I care to share here.
There is nothing more natural in a landscape than grass. If you’re wanting to save some money on a landscaping idea, try incorporating this natural element into the scene as heavily as possible. Grass doesn’t get enough credit. It’s a gorgeous color, it grows easily and odds are, it’s already existent in your landscape. In this funky scene, stepping stones are used to create an interesting pattern in the grass. The brilliant green just cuts between the stones creating a fun shape that is definitely an eye-catcher.
There’s a lot more to do on a porch than swing, and since it’s such an important part of a Southern home it should be beautiful. You can add charm to this incredible space with hanging ferns—a quintessential feature for any Southern porch. Cheery containers also add inviting color to this architectural essential. So get the containers filled with ferns, get the porch swing ready for company, set the rockers out, and get ready to enjoy a gorgeous summer evening—your container garden just made every minute spent in this family-friendly space even more beautiful.
Get out the wire patterns and get ready to make some amazing shapes because once you have boxwood in your container garden you will want to give them their own unique identities. Boxwood’s willingness to be clipped, shaped, and trained makes it the perfect candidate for a classic topiary. There are guides for learning tips and tricks to achieve the perfect topiary design. We’ve got images of the amazing topiary skills of Pearl Fryar—and you may one day wish to emulate his creative skills—so get clipping, and with skill and patience you’ll soon have your boxwood topiaries in tip-top shape.
If it's evident that your backyard remodel or update can't be a DIY project, hire a landscape designer or architect to help your outdoor space realize its potential. A skilled professional can guide you through the process of figuring out a style, deciding who will be using the yard, creating zones of activity, choosing materials and plants, and recommending builders and contractors for everything from swimming pools to outdoor structures to installing irrigation.
If you ask anyone what the easiest way to transform the look of your home landscape is, they’ll definitely tell you: blooms. Blossoming flowers, shrubs, and trees make an incredible impact across a yard, and you can add color in just one lasting step. For major impact, we recommend Chinese snowball, which we think is one of spring's showiest shrubs. White flower clusters—that grow 6 to 8 inches across—festoon its branches in late spring. It’s a thrill to behold. The plant gets big; we’ve seen them grow from 12 to 20 feet tall and wide. And by the way, though it looks like a hydrangea, it's actually a viburnum.
Create a posh look around your landscaping area by incorporating some modern fencing. This is one of the best cheap landscaping edging ideas that will never go out of style. Whether you have a large property or you just want to fence in a small garden area, incorporating really great fencing can add so much character to any given area. With minimalistic fencing, such as this fencing depicted in the picture, you aren’t wasting a lot of material, yet the fencing does its job and looks really great. The yard will look polished and totally modern.
Building large retaining walls is not considered a DIY project. If you need a tall wall, chances are you have an erosion problem just waiting to happen and need to call on a professional. By contrast, though, simple terracing jobs are excellent DIY landscaping projects for beginners. After building small stone retaining walls, you can plant behind them, as you would for a raised bed.

There’s just something about pools and rock gardens that sync so well together. Pool areas can be a bit expensive to maintain, so in order to add some creative flair without having to spend a lot of money, use items you have on hand. If you have a pre-existing garden, odds are you have some garden rocks or stones that could easily be transformed and used in a funky rock garden like this one depicted. Since this is a pool area, you’d want to steer clear from using tiny stones or pebbles since these could make their way into the pool easier.
We’ve just built a small guest house behind our home in Southwest Mississippi. Red clay surrounds the house! I’ve sprinkled rye grass seed and covered it with hay, but I realize (now) that I need some top soil. What should be my next steps? The rest of the yard is covered with a mixture of Bermuda and who-knows-what. It’s pretty patchy too! (I can’t afford to re-sod the whole 2 acres…)
There is a fight for sun. If the grass doesn't shade the weed, the weed will shade the grass. Sun is food. Food is strength and life. Shade is weakness, disease and death. Grass will shade the weeds only if it is tall enough. The shade of tall, dense grass turf will prevent essential light from reaching most weeds and, will aid in the destruction of new baby weed seedlings (such as the notorius dandelion).
Heat-tolerant geraniums, calibrachoas, and mecardonias in bright red, yellow, and purple shout a welcome in a cheerful way. For the most part, we’ve filled these whitewashed pots to bursting with a single color of each, showing how to create harmony from the variations between each element. This approach works well, creating a single environment for each container, making the task of watering and fertilizing, and sun simple. Whatever plants you choose, make sure they thrive in similar conditions. All three of these plants are heat-tolerant, making them perfect for grouping together.

With most soils, do not apply all the water in a short period of time. If applied too quickly, water often runs off of thatchy turf, from sloped areas, or from turf growing on heavy clay or compacted soils. In these cases, it is more effective to apply only a portion of the water and move the sprinkler or switch to another station to water another section of the lawn. This allows water to soak into the soil rather than run off. An hour or so later, apply the rest of the water. Core cultivation (aeration) can resolve some infiltration problems by reducing thatch and compaction. Wetting agents may enhance water movement into the soil, but they should not be considered a cure-all, especially when compaction or thatch are problems.


To finish last year's backyard work, we put in the lawn.  The ground was level and the soil was adequate, so all we had to do was rent a roller ($7), add minimal nutrients, and it was ready to go.  We chose to lay sod because we have children and a dog, and it would have been very difficult to keep them out of seed-sown grass for an extended time.  The small area lent itself to sod, and provided instant green for minimal cash outlay. 
Instead of purchasing stepping stones, create beautifully homemade pathways. You need a 40-pound bag of quick-setting cement (less than $8), a shovel or hand-shovel for mixing ($5 to $15), a paint bucket ($3), a ruler ($1), a bag of decorative marbles or shells ($5), and several shallow cardboard boxes. Mix the cement with three pints of water in your paint bucket – you can adjust the amount of cement and water, but the general rule is six pints per every 80-pound bag (check the directions on your bag). Once mixed, pour the cement into a square-shaped cardboard box to create a form. Then, simply place marbles or colored glass in the cement and let it dry for adorable stepping stones with a homemade touch.
If you have container gardens, chances are they're on your porch, entryway, deck, patio, or balcony. Too few gardeners consider the gardening idea of mixing containers into their beds and borders. Doing so is an easy way to add flexibility to the landscape. Large, colorful glazed or plastic containers are a great landscape idea to add a bright splash, even without blooms. You can move them around to highlight different parts of your yard, plus it's easy to change out container gardens each season to get a different look.
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