When creating areas of defined space in your landscape, it’s important to establish and maintain borders. This is key because edging can draw the eye to different areas, keep things looking tidy and organized, and allow you to add some style with your materials of choice. Be sure to check out the Southern Living Plant Collection for border planting ideas.
A small yard in London makes the most of its space by using walls to plant vertical gardens. Designed by Living Colour Gardens, the outdoor room features an Ipe-hardwood zigzag bench with illumination underneath for fun outdoor parties at night. The patio is paved with travertine, while raised white-rendered planting beds echo the shape of the bench. Plants include African lilies, Japanese maples, and large Allium bulbs.
Another way to make the most of your yard landscape is by planting lovely rambling vines. There’s nothing more stately or romantic than deep green tendrils winding around fences and columns, especially when you’ve chosen a delicate, flowering vine species. Clematis is one of the showiest vines we have, and it would look great in your yard. It offers blossoms of blue, purple, red, pink, or white. We recommend growing this versatile vine on a fence, on a trellis, or in a container. Or, for a more laissez-faire gardening style, let them ramble and scramble over your shrubs and perennials.
From the first ideas to the final plantings, planning is key. That's why you must break out the gridded graph paper and sketch a detailed plan for how you want your landscape to look. Having a map of your intended designs notated with plantings and plots will help you first imagine what should go where and then bring your vision to fruition. (It’s also a handy guide to keep nearby when you’re elbow deep in hostas and can’t remember how many rows you meant to plant.)
Choosing to do your own landscaping will ultimately save you money in the long run. Yes, there may be some up front costs of purchasing your own tools and buying the wrong fertilizer a time or two, but you won’t be paying to have a service come and do the landscaping for you. Many homeowners who choose to do their own landscaping work have other family members that can help out with the chores like spouses or kids. Tending to your own landscaping is a budget friendly option that many homeowners choose in order to save money.
This window box design is concerned less with the box as a container, and more with the box as a foundation for an incredible approach to beauty. Layered, loud, and filled with color and excitement, coleus, begonias, and purple fountain grass spill from this spectacular window box, completely hiding the container. The purple fountain grass blooms in summer, and can continue blooming into fall, giving this container wonder from season to season. Coleus comes in every color of the rainbow, and remains bright from spring through fall. This sets up a container full of wonder. Put it together and let its radiance glow.
To create a poinsettia tree, follow these instructions: First, cut the larger blooms, leaving about 6 inches of stem. Sear them quickly to stop sap from dripping out. Sap should bubble under the candle flame, and the ends of the stems will turn black. You may also need to sear the points where larger leaves were removed along the stems. Insert each seared stem into a water-filled florist tube. Stems are hollow and will absorb water after being seared. Place the stems into the base of the ivy topiary. Then repeat this process with the medium-size and smaller poinsettia blooms, cutting the stems so they're about 4 inches long. Insert blossoms into the topiary, working your way toward the top. Once it's complete, care is simple—just add water to the tubes every few days, as needed.
The historical term for a classically designed French garden is a 'parterre garden.' Some of its most famous examples are actually in England, including the fabulous—and recently recreated—geometric garden at Hanbury Hall. This container garden, with its formal structure and arrangement, takes both its inspiration and its design from the parterre garden design concept—but the container gardening part of the process is still incredibly simple. Regardless of your overall garden design plan, you can add some height to the center of any flowerbed by placing a very vertical potted plant in its middle. Here, a potted rosemary topiary rises above the other edibles in this bed. What is so sensational about this approach is that it uses a traditional language, but with new, timesaving gardening innovations.
The real difference between a project that you do yourself and one that is professionally done is performance, speed and repair. If you are looking only at how much money you can save, what does that matter if what you’ve done isn’t right? A landscaping project is one place where this thought is made clear. The act of sodding, planting trees, and creating flower beds, among other things, is back breaking, but doable. The knowledge can be learned by reading several books and studying up on different schools of thought, but you don’t need to know codes, understand how to calculate soil compaction, or cubic water pressure.
You can grow your very own mini-orchard on the balcony of your apartment. There are a number of fruits that are well-suited to apartment gardening and grow beautifully outdoors in a pot or window box. For most of these, you’ll need a pot that’s at least 30″ in diameter and has holes for drainage. You’ll need at least 1 foot in depth, plus room for good drainage material, like pebbles or stones. And don’t forget something like a pan underneath to catch any water, especially if there’s another balcony below yours. Apartment gardening means being a good neighbor, as well. Here are some fruits that you can grow:

Flowers are great, but don't forget the characteristics of a plant's branching pattern and foliage. In landscape design, varying form and texture is one way to spice up a yard with diversity. Evergreen conifers, while lacking flowers altogether, nonetheless have foliage that offers a myriad of different forms and textures. While browsing these do-it-yourself landscaping tips, you'll discover many ways to enhance the beauty of your yard.
Yes, you read that right. This does say collard greens, and they really are one of our picks for a fantastic container garden. Easy and versatile, collards have graced Southern gardens and tables for generations. A cousin to kale and cabbage, these nutritious, leafy greens thrive in the cooler weather of fall and early spring. Durable, versatile, and beautiful, they are also incredibly enticing visually, and imbued with a range of tonal variation. They work well in differently sized containers. This galvanized-metal tub is filled with collards, creating an intimate container garden. Use them in situations where you would like simplicity to come to the fore.
Other lawn care companies simply can’t compare to the outstanding yard care services we provide. Our year-round program of continuous treatments consists of bio-nutrition, targeted pre- and post-emergent weed control applications, and strategic fertilization, using products that are custom-formulated specifically for the unique weather conditions in the Atlanta area. By timing our applications strategically throughout the year, your lawn will continue to look picturesque regardless of the season.

A small yard in London makes the most of its space by using walls to plant vertical gardens. Designed by Living Colour Gardens, the outdoor room features an Ipe-hardwood zigzag bench with illumination underneath for fun outdoor parties at night. The patio is paved with travertine, while raised white-rendered planting beds echo the shape of the bench. Plants include African lilies, Japanese maples, and large Allium bulbs.
Depending on soil type, core disintegration may take a few days to several weeks. Irrigation helps wash the soil from the cores. Dragging a piece of cyclone fence or an old metal door mat can speed the process. Running over the cores with a rotary mower can be effective but can dull the blade. Many commercial companies that perform core cultivation break up the cores with a power rake. If the cores are removed from the lawn, compost them before using them as a mulch or soil amendment.

Although it is sometimes confused with the completed unrelated plant the Bougainvillea, mandevilla is a beautiful, bright flowering and climbing vine found throughout the South. Mandevillas can thrive in containers—as with the one pictured, which twines its way through the railing on a rooftop deck. Reveling in hot weather given its tropical origins, mandevilla can grow more than 10 feet a year, and will bloom continuously from spring until the first frost. And, although in the tropical and coastal South they may weather the winter outdoors, if you plant them in containers you may even bring them inside for the cold season.
Assuming you are in the right zone for this type of planting, if you don't want to spend all of your time watering, stick with easy-care options in some of your containers. Succulents and bougainvilleas need little care in containers. You can choose succulents that will grow to create senses of scale and drama, such as agave, or aloe. Depending on your choice of succulent, some of these may grow as tall as ten feet high, so be are of their potential when planning your container garden. Then, prepare for a beautiful sight.
Extend your living space to the great outdoors with Landscaping Ideas that Work. Landscaping often involves the harmonious design of many disparate elements, which creates confusion and inertia for homeowners who are trying to decide not only what to do, but where to start. Landscaping Ideas that Work covers front, back, and side yards, and provides you with strategies for combining elements and creating spaces that work for you and your home; innovative ideas for transforming all aspects of your yard into inviting outdoor spaces; and designs for more sustainable landscapes and gardens.
On 2 days notice, you came to blow out my sprinkler before the predicted big drop in temperature last night! On a Sunday no less. I couldn't have been more impressed or more appreciative. You can be sure I will be telling all my neighbors what tremendous service you gave! So rare to find a company with that level of commitment anymore. Again, thank-you!

Replacing lawn with a ground cover of rocks or large boulder accents cuts down on upkeep and the need for irrigation. In addition to adding a rugged look to your backyard, sand- or stone-based ground cover can double as a weed suppressor and foundation for stepping stones. Moreover, choose low-maintenance plants, like sedum or succulents, to plant in the rock garden for beautiful contrast.

Set a Time Budget and Stick to it Much like dollars count, your time counts, too, when it comes to do it yourself landscaping. "You have to think about when you'll get to things," says Miller. "You have to realistically look at when you can get things done and if you want to eat up every nice-weather weekend. Don't overcommit and wind up disappointed."
Although they may not be the first thing that come to mind, don’t ignore edibles when selecting your planting materials. Different varieties of lettuce have beautiful color and texture, and can add both visual interest and an unexpected kitchen surprise to your container garden. Here, several leafy edibles mix with violas and mums. These leafy greens will be a surprise to people who wonder what is creating the beautiful colors in your containers—and you’ll be just as surprised if you choose to let them be the centerpiece of something on your dinner plate.

Assuming you are in the right zone for this type of planting, if you don't want to spend all of your time watering, stick with easy-care options in some of your containers. Succulents and bougainvilleas need little care in containers. You can choose succulents that will grow to create senses of scale and drama, such as agave, or aloe. Depending on your choice of succulent, some of these may grow as tall as ten feet high, so be are of their potential when planning your container garden. Then, prepare for a beautiful sight.


You can follow all the above do-it-yourself landscaping tips and still not be happy with your yard. For, besides giving your yard a pleasing appearance, you must also be sensible in planning for its maintenance. Beautiful or not, you'll resent your yard if it causes you too much work. Unless you don't mind spending hours each weekend on upkeep, plan your design for low maintenance.


If you are looking for a simple but fantastic summer gathering decorating idea, one of the best is to add color to your outdoor party with potted plants. In the heat of the season in the South, there’s no need for a patterned tablecloth here. Potted petunias will add all the beautiful color you need under the glass-top dining table, and make a show stopping, sensational and unexpected addition to your outdoor party décor. These planters have a simple curved wrought-iron base that works well with the simple glass top of the table, but you can match the container to your own personal design and decorating style.
Being a homeowner is a big responsibility, and while there's plenty to take care of inside you home, don't forget about the outside, either. If you've ever looked into the cost of hiring a professional landscaper, you know they're not cheap. Fortunately, there are a slew of inexpensive and affordable DIY landscaping ideas at your disposal, so long as you're willing to get your hands a little dirty. From the front yard to the back, barbeque pits to bistro lights, here are 59 ways you can affordably improve your outdoor space.              
Or opt for hard non-gardening materials to contrast with the softness and monotony of nature’s green. “Make a table using an oversized flower pot or lobster trap filled with something that represents your passion — golf balls, sea shells — and cover the container with a wood or glass top,” says Fraynd. “These can be fun to talk about and give a unique personality to your yard.”

This sturdy galvanized-metal washtub—a flea market gem—is filled to an overflowing beauty with a hearty mix of lantanas and impatiens. Arranged with maroon Joseph’s coat, green coleus, and yellow creeping Jenny, this dense container was designed to highlight a back porch, or greet guests with its sense of joy and happiness on the front porch just as easily. Coleus varieties were first introduced into Europe in the 1700s, and their popularity remains high today. Given their tropical history, they are not particularly cold hardy, so don’t plan to make them a part of this container too early in the spring.

Purple heart is a wonderful ground cover, but it can have a tendency to run, and become invasive. As the focus of a container it fills to a beautiful, bold color, and a lush fullness. Create opportunities for container gardening by building planters into your hardscaping any time you do a creative outdoor project. In this innovative design they have literally taken the edge off—a large, round planter filled with Purple Heart softens the corner of this wall. Let it become a feature, and let a plant like Purple Heart be its focal point.
You can bring real definition to your backyard and create a great look with pavers. An easy project you can do yourself, pavers make a strong foundation for your outdoor entertaining area or you can run a pathway through your garden. You’ll find Bunnings has a range of different paver colours and designs to suit any backyard, from concrete textured pavers, panelstone and sandstone pavers and concrete log-style stepping stones.
If you are starting with a blank slate, choosing the right kind of plants for your yard can be an overwhelming experience. There are so many options and each plant has a particular kind of soil and sun exposure that they grow best in as well as different moisture requirements. Doing your own landscaping will require a lot of reading up on native plants in your area as well as the possibility of pulling plants that you think are weeds.
Just like anything that you do yourself, choosing to do your own landscaping can be a big time commitment. Getting your yard to look the way that you want it to can take months, if not years, to achieve. Many nights and weekends will be spent outdoors trying to keep your landscaping looking sharp and not overgrown. Many families are overextended on schedules and have a little amount of extra time to begin with so adding in landscaping responsibilities could take up more time that you even have available for the task.
If you don’t necessarily want to use old tires as planters, why not try creating your very own fish pond? Well, the fish could be completely optional, but turning a tire into a pond is super simple and a really great way to add some interesting elements into a garden scape. Even better, they are so cheap! If you don’t have any used tires on hand, you can easily find tires at junk yards or garage sales. Creating your own tire pond could be a fun, quick and cheap way to liven up your landscape.
Add this idea to your cheap garden landscaping ideas bank! Not only are stepping stone paths adorable, but they can actually prove to be quite useful. Stepping stones really don’t cost much at all to buy, but if you have stones on hand, you can easily create your own stepping path. Creating these types of paths look great in any garden setting, even in front yards. You don’t necessarily have to have a garden in order to create a great stepping stone path, but if you do incorporate them into an already existing garden, you can easily create interesting shapes, sizes and styles.
If your yard has limited space it's important to make the most of it! One key landscape idea is to take advantage of plants that serve more than one purpose. This espaliered apple tree, for example, offers privacy from the neighbor on the other side of it; provides an attractive backdrop for the curve in a path; and in autumn, gives a harvest of delicious apples.
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