Our many beautiful pictures of backyard landscaping ideas are online to inspire you to begin designing the perfect yard layout. Looking at these photos can help you decide upon the types of trees, shrubs, or flowers you wish to plant in your front or backyard. Planting landscaping trees outside your home can add shade as well as beauty to any space. You can even browse our online design galleries to find simple landscaping designs 2017 before and after to see the types of transformations that can take place by the addition of all types of plants.
Caladiums are one of the most popular plants in the South for creating beauty in difficult-to-grow-in shady places. Caladiums—a tropical plant native to America—have incredibly colored foliage that can have blotches of red, rose, pink, white, and more. Some of our favorite caladiums include ‘Pink Symphony,’ ‘Iceberg,’ ‘Miss Muffet,’ and ‘Candyland.’ To bring this beautiful plant into your landscaping plan easily, integrate planters into your hardscape. This poolside scene includes a trough-like container built right into the bank. Fill it with a colorful array of caladiums and you will have created your own personal poolside tropical oasis.
Sitting in a natural environment, on a table of weathered wood, this container is a perfect lesson in how to best frame colorful plants with a textured background. These vibrant ‘Molten Orange’ coleuses provide a pop of color among textural grass plantings. Plants with bold but often or predominantly monochrome foliage, such as coleus, can work well in a classically shaped planter such as this one with Roman and Rococo influences. Filling in below the coleus is ivy, its green-and-white leaves spilling over the planter’s natural patina of aged cast iron. Resist the urge to sand or sandblast containers such as these if they are structurally sound—simply brush off any loose debris and leave their history and finish to shine through.

I recommend "tall fescue". Be sure to check the label and make sure it is pure tall fescue. Some outfits that sell seed mix in some annual ryegrass and call it "nursury grass - it will care for the tall fescue which takes longer to germinate." I don't agree with that. Note that tall fescue seed is significantly more expensive than annual ryegrass ...
If you’re putting in a few flowers or plants, it’s tempting to load your shopping cart with bags of expensive potting soil. Certainly this is important to give your plants the nutrients they need, but you don’t have to do it with soil alone. You can cut your soil costs in half by making the most of your family’s leftover organic scraps. Mix a bag of potting soil with equal parts backyard compost for a nutrient-dense mixture that your plants should love.

Wooden pallets are seriously nifty to have on hand. If you have any leftover after making some sweet patio furniture, you can easily use them to create some adorable garden boxes, too! Plant tomatoes, herbs, squash, onions or whatever you want! You can basically create your own vegetable patio without ever having to go to the store to get fresh veggies. Add some wheels to the bottoms of the boxes for easier mobility and to prevent your plants from flooding or getting too much sun.
Container gardens are perfect ways to highlight the elegance of simplicity. This succulent garden is a perfect example of having individual plantings in single containers, allowing each to reflect its unique leaf shape and form complemented by the architecture of the container. Using various decorative ground covers jazzes up your potted plantings—these are enhanced with beautiful selections of natural stone. The highlight of this design is a potted blue agave surrounded by pebbles serves as a living sculpture on this deck. The smooth stones inside the container reflect the larger stones around its base, creating a synthesis of inside and out.
Having a container that looks immaculate does not have to mean sourcing an antique or making an expensive purchase—although you may want to look at some of the beautiful, historical containers that remain available to the present day. If a simple approach that only looks like it cost a pretty penny is more your style, there is always a way to update your standard plastic planter. A gel stain was applied to this pot for a richer finish. It was then filled with a selection of Ivy, Ferns, Impatiens, and Caladiums, for a bold, multilevel container design that is both elegant and affordable.
It's easy to create a hodgepodge look when planting if you try to plant one of everything. Avoid that with this gardening idea: Reusing the same colors, shapes, or plant varieties in plantings. Here's a perfect example: To the left of the deck, golden creeping Jenny (Lysimachia nummularia 'Aurea') echoes the color of golden sweet flag (Acorus gramineus 'Ogon'). The sweet flag augments the texture of the blue fescue (Festuca 'Elijah Blue'), which plays off the silvery-blue color of a potted false cypress (Chamaecyparis pisifera 'Baby Blue'). The shape of the false cypress, in turn, is a repeat of the Japanese maple next to the deck.
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