Let's hear it for elephant's ear! Its oversize leaves—the secret to this stately combination—create drama through scale. And they allow you to fill in the blanks with tiny, colorful flowers. This arrangement is set in a concrete urn with an aggregate texture to give it a weathered, antiqued finish.  You’ll love how the delicate flowers soften the feel of the urn itself. One of the beautiful wonders of elephant’s ear is that it flowers first, and then fruits. The fruit has been described as making the stem look like corn on the cob. Whatever you think, it looks gorgeous in your summertime container.
You’ll definitely feel the power of gold when you combine the beauty of these three containers in your garden. These bright blooms of 'Ogon' golden sweet flag, 'Matrix Yellow Blotch' pansies, and 'Penny Clear Yellow' violas will make your pots and flowerbeds glow. Choose containers of similar materials but varying heights to create visual interest, and then tie everything together through the use of the shared tones of your plants. You will love how bright and bold these flowers are. You can add in height by including a grass in one of the plants if you like, or mix in some filler should you wish.
Like patios and walkways, these "hardscape" elements bring structure to your landscaping. Traditionally made of wood, decks, fences and arbors are now sometimes composed of other materials. Composite wood is an option to consider for decking and deck railings, while vinyl fences and arbors have become very common. It's also important to consider the landscaping that will surround a fence or deck.
Not only can you save money on ground cover over sod, the maintenance is easier and less costly over time. Stick to portions of the yard that are hard to maintain, such as heavily shaded areas, side yards, and transitional spaces, to make sure your yard doesn’t look overrun by a forest of plants. Keep grass in sunny areas, if you’d like. And if you live in an extremely arid region, consider xeriscaping your yard.

This woven wicker basket is a natural way to decorate a bare wall in an outdoor space, and it will look just as beautiful whether you set it against brick, timber, or concrete. Pink zinnias and yellow tuberous begonias are the focal points or 'thrillers'. You’ll love the variation between the tighter, round zinnias and the softer, open petals of the begonias. Blue Cape plumbago and golden lantana add an extra hint of drama—think of these as the 'fillers'. Finally, English ivy, with its delicate, well-known shape, cascades over the side—that is the 'spiller', which gives this beautiful hanging container a sense of movement.
Owner, architect, and site merged a design from their mutual association with the river. Located on the edge of Goose Creek, the owner was drawn to the site, reminiscent of a river from his youth that he used to tube down with friends and a 6-pack of beer. The architect, although growing up a country way, had similar memories along the water. Design gains momentum from conversations of built forms they recall floating along: mills and industrial compounds lining waterways that once acted as their lifeline. The common memories of floating past stone abutments and looking up at timber trussed bridges from below inform the interior. The concept extends into the hardscape in piers, and terraces that recall those partial elements remaining in and around the river.
Many factors influence lawn water requirements, and no two lawns are exactly alike. A healthy, high-quality bluegrass or ryegrass lawn may need up to 2.25 inches of water per week under hot, dry, windy summer conditions. It may require much less when the weather is cool or cloudy. Turf-type tall fescue may perform well with less water than a bluegrass lawn, if it can grow a deep root system. In many cases, however, tall fescue requires as much water as bluegrass to look good. Buffalograss and blue grama lawns can remain green for weeks without watering, even during the hottest summer weather.
A lush front lawn is as American as apple pie, but it’s not the most financially savvy choice you can make – particularly if you live in an arid climate or struggle to keep your grass green and weed-free. Many homeowners deal with patchy and weeded lawns simply by re-sodding the yard, but this can cost several thousand dollars. In fact, The National Gardening Association notes that fresh grass sod can cost 15 to 35 cents per square foot, and more than double that amount if professionally installed. Grass also requires a hefty amount of water, and may need fertilizer and weed treatments as well, all of which impact your bottom line.
With so much refurbishing and repurposing going on these days, you can pretty much make a cute little garden planter out of anything. Take this wheelbarrow for example, you can use it to fill with actual dirt and seeds, or just use it as a holder for other pots or planters. Not only is it adorable, but it’s a great way to find new life in something either old or just worn down. Again, a little paint or wood stain goes a long way and you can easily recreate this to look fantastic in any landscape.
When filling a show-stopping window box, don't hesitate to use small evergreen shrubs or perennials, which last throughout the seasons. These work well in window boxes and provide sustained and consistent color. In the fall, turn to mums, kales, pansies, violas, and snapdragons for color, and then add a few daffodil or tulip bulbs for a bold burst of excitement in the spring. Be sure to include something that can spill over the edge of the window box and you’re assured of a sense of movement, and a great deal of excitement. Keep the evergreens trimmed as necessary—you’ll love how restrained they look against the bold splashes of color.
Certain ornamental grasses, like maiden grass, are resistant to dog traffic without having sharp blades that will cut or otherwise injure your pup. This greenery holds its shape throughout the year, and will give your dog plenty of space to play. That being said, what’s more important than planting dog-resistant plants is planting species that are not harmful to dogs. Some flowers, like azaleas and daffodils, can be toxic to dogs and should not be planted in a place where they might accidentally be ingested.

Heat-tolerant geraniums, calibrachoas, and mecardonias in bright red, yellow, and purple shout a welcome in a cheerful way. For the most part, we’ve filled these whitewashed pots to bursting with a single color of each, showing how to create harmony from the variations between each element. This approach works well, creating a single environment for each container, making the task of watering and fertilizing, and sun simple. Whatever plants you choose, make sure they thrive in similar conditions. All three of these plants are heat-tolerant, making them perfect for grouping together.

Even if you don’t necessarily have a green thumb, this is one of the best cheap easy gardening ideas out there! You can easily create bloom boxes out of old wood you have already laying around the house, or even if you have to go out and purchase some, spare wood really isn’t expensive at all. Creating bloom boxes to sit outside windows gives the area a quaint garden look without overpowering the setup, so no matter what size of landscape you’re dealing with, these boxes create just enough charm for any setting.
If variety is the spice of life, mixing tones and textures certainly brings both variety and life to this gorgeous small-scale container garden. Within a design scheme that could best be described as clean-rustic meets semi-modern, smooth metals and natural woods all combine into one harmonious whole. Rather than stick to a rigorous, single-plant approach, here a series of textural leaves gives a more modern look. An assortment of plants in shades of green anchors the backyard corner and adds depth in the small space. Settle in on the comfortable bench and enjoy a relaxing afternoon in this incredible container garden wonder.
Sometimes your container garden can focus as much on its structures as it does on its plants and flowers. With creative thinking, large pots can be repurposed around your yard. This unused pot fountain was repurposed as an accent table and stand for a cheerful container planting. In a similar vein, low columns can also form pedestals for containers. Look in antique stores, salvage yards, and related locations for unexpected finds that can ground your garden with creativity and history. Then, think outside the container and create new pieces that are uniquely yours.
It is both beautiful and simple to use impatiens to accent porches and entryways, and as filler flowers, they subtly enhance any garden container. Here, a skirt of coral impatiens surrounds a dwarf Alberta spruce. The dwarf spruce is also well suited for container gardening— ‘Tiny Tower’, for example, grows to a full height of between only 4-6 feet tall. These beautiful, small trees also have soft, bright green needles when they are young, and color to a gorgeous silver-green as they mature. You may need to gently prune this spruce into shape, which will help to promote slow growth and a full, dense form. You’ll love the results.
This is a super cute idea that can be manifested in any sized yard. Even if you have a smaller fence, you can easily create tiny wooden flower boxes out of spare wood or particle board. If you plan on making these garden boxes, you can prevent the wood from becoming soggy from water by lining them or place individual flower pots into the wooden box. You can make these any color you’d like and even mix and match colors and shapes for an even more interesting approach.
If you use stone in landscaping beds, consider how much wind your region gets and how the stone will match the aesthetic of your home. "Pea stone comes in different sizes, so you can get a three-quarter inch stone if you're worried about wind," says Chris. "Crushed stone also comes in a variety of colors, so you can change it depending on your style, house color, or area of the country."
This is my first year having a true garden, and so far I’m loving the time I get outside playing in the dirt and absorbing the sunshine. It’s certainly a nice break from my computer! As a beginner, I’m learning a lot of things that will make next year’s garden easier, and hopefully a little healthier, too. I don’t want to win the prize for the largest squash (not there yet), but I do want enough juicy tomatoes to last all summer long.
Shallow, frequent watering encourages "thatch" (the grass propogates with above-soil runners (like strawberry runners) rather than rhizomes under the soil - there gets to be so many runners that they weave a mat that chokes out water and air). Since the roots are in the top inch or two of soil, a hot day will quickly dry the soil and much of the grass will brown. Weeds and weed seedlings looooove a daily watering. It's just what they need for a good start.
I just had my yard aerated two days ago and the temperatures went from 70 to 45 degrees. Before I had the lawn aerated I raked up the leaves. Now since the lawn was aerated my neighbors leaves have blown over in my lawn. Is it two late in the season to plant grass seeds? If so, can I just spread the seeds directly on the leaves? Or would it be in my best interest to wait until early spring 2012?
Incorporating pots into landscaping not only makes a yard more low-maintenance, but also more versatile. "We love to use pots, especially for clients who want color in different parts of the yard," says Peyton. "Plus, pots are easy to move around. If you're having a party on your patio, you can move them to that area." For an added pop of color, coordinate the flowers to the season — try whites and pinks in the spring and summer, and switch to yellows and reds in the fall.
When browsing landscape photos, think about curb appeal above all else; landscape designs are your chance to make a great first impression. A flower garden is a great option, but if ongoing care is a concern, you can simplify the process by opting for low-maintenance succulents, bushes or hedges instead. If you don't have a green thumb, consider simple and easy-to-implement landscape design ideas, such as grass, gravel pathways, water features, statues, wood fences or stone walls.
By carefully sculpting the landscape and choosing the right plants and materials, you can hide an unattractive driveway. With only a few steps, that less-than-picture perfect portion of your home can be transformed into a gardener’s paradise. Start by creating a slightly raised island of lawn in the center of the drive. Then, add a low boxwood hedge toward the back of the island with roses, annuals, and perennials rising above the hedge in the front. Blend a variety of colors, textures, and heights for a great look. Try 'Crystal Fairy' rose for height, lamb's ears for texture, and 'Butterfly Deep Rose' pentas for color.
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